1. Join Now

    AVForums.com uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Treating screen burn

Discussion in 'Plasma TVs' started by mjbarnard, Nov 8, 2004.

  1. mjbarnard

    mjbarnard
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    My Hitachi 42 5300 has an option to address screen burn by producing a white screen for 10 minutes or so. Would using this facility affect (shorten?) screen life or quality?

    I have to admit that after a full day of installing the panel I fell asleep with Evita DVD playing. The end of this DVD has a bright static screenshot with the word EVITA displayed prominently. Even worse - before I had read the advice of others on this forum - I had not reduced the contrast and brightness and the picture was in dynamic mode!

    The thing is that even after 4 hours of a static bright picture (within the first 10 hours of use) I cannot see any effects or obvious screen burn. So - is there any point in using the white clean function? Does using it affect screen life or quality in any way? If not - how often can/should one use it?

    Thanks in advance...
     
  2. LV426

    LV426
    Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2000
    Messages:
    12,823
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Somewhere in South Yorkshire
    Ratings:
    +5,032
    Plasma screen burn works like this (and there are no absolute measures here):

    All the time any given pixel is illuminated, it ages. As it ages, it gets dimmer. The extent and speed that this happens is a function of brightness x duration. It's also probably true that this deterioration is more rapid at the start of the screen's life, and also varies from screen to screen (by manufacturer) depending on how robust their phosphors are.

    So, all other things being equal, the brighter it is, the longer it is, the dimmer it gets.

    Screen burn only becomes a visible issue when a given set of pixels on the screen becomes noticeably dimmer than the rest. This will happen when they were illuminated brighter, for longer, than the others.

    The white wash method is intended to (relatively) rapidly age the entire screen so that all pixels are dimmed to a similar extent - thus evening out the overall brightness and removing the visibility of the ageing effect.

    The sort answer, then, is - only use the white wash if and when you have a visible problem to resolve.

    Oh - and get your brightness and contrast levels down.
     
  3. MAW

    MAW
    Banned

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2002
    Messages:
    14,082
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    106
    Location:
    Nr Dorking
    Ratings:
    +412
    You were extremely lucky to get away with that, the Hitachi is the most prone to burn in, and general panel aging. Nigel is as usual bang on the money, the white screen ages the panel, and I wouldn't want to do this with a Hitachi unless it became absolutely necessary. Do a search for 'grey cloud' to find out why. Set your alarm for midnight if this is likely to be a regular habit, but having put the fear of god into you, you can see that screenburn is not as big an issue as it's cracked up to be, you have none after what could be classed as wanton abuse, be grateful and don't do it again!
     

Share This Page

Loading...