Travelling man!

MrFraggle

Distinguished Member
It maybe that I will be travelling down to Paignton in Devon from Edinburgh and wonder the best way to go about this?
Cost is not a major issue but obviously a consideration.
I think my choices are flying down to Exeter, I think there are flights from Edinburgh, what if any documentation is required for this?
Train but that could prove pricy unless I do this split journey tickets lark of which I know nothing.
High a car which would at least give me transport whilst in Devon though of course I could hire a car locally.
 

DemonAV

Distinguished Member
That's a long drive if you're going to do it from Edinburgh. We flew from London to Edinburgh and picked up a pre booked car from the airport. Flying is the cheaper option and will give you more time to explore around Devon. If you're in Devon you should check out a bit of Cornwall as well.
You won't need any documentation if travelling from Scotland to England (other than your passport if flying) but I'm not sure about entering back into Scotland from England as wee Jimmy Kranky may have introduced something if travelling back?
 

FishDUDE

Well-known Member
If it were me I'd get the train, flying to exeter from Edinburgh is logan air who are pretty expensive for the service and you'd need to either get in to exeter city then get a train to Paignton or hire a car and drive. The train takes about 8 or 9 hours which is a downside but the cost would be about the same as the flights depending on how early you book it (you'd have to change trains in exeter). Alternatively if you're okay hiring a car flying to Bristol and driving down is much cheaper with easyjet when I last did it. - Looks like you can get a return for about £50 depending on times days etc.

Internal flights you can get away with a drivers licence to ID, you might have to fill out a passanger locator for both ways to prove you've not been elsewhere in the last 10 days.
 

rousetafarian

Moderator
Agreed don’t let the potential lack of a passport hinder you, I managed to get out of the UK with my OH’s passport for 4 days and back via International arrivals at Heathrow on Aer Lingus.
 

MrFraggle

Distinguished Member
That's a long drive if you're going to do it from Edinburgh. We flew from London to Edinburgh and picked up a pre booked car from the airport. Flying is the cheaper option and will give you more time to explore around Devon. If you're in Devon you should check out a bit of Cornwall as well.
You won't need any documentation if travelling from Scotland to England (other than your passport if flying) but I'm not sure about entering back into Scotland from England as wee Jimmy Kranky may have introduced something if travelling back?
You'll be joking about needing a passport I'm assuming for an internal flight?
If it were me I'd get the train, flying to exeter from Edinburgh is logan air who are pretty expensive for the service and you'd need to either get in to exeter city then get a train to Paignton or hire a car and drive. The train takes about 8 or 9 hours which is a downside but the cost would be about the same as the flights depending on how early you book it (you'd have to change trains in exeter). Alternatively if you're okay hiring a car flying to Bristol and driving down is much cheaper with easyjet when I last did it. - Looks like you can get a return for about £50 depending on times days etc.

Internal flights you can get away with a drivers licence to ID, you might have to fill out a passanger locator for both ways to prove you've not been elsewhere in the last 10 days.
Will look into the Bristol option.
 

rousetafarian

Moderator
Maybe choose whats better for your carbon footprint?
I don‘t factor this in to my travel plans, and I doubt the OP is chartering his own private flight or is a frequent international flyer (but who is these days?).

A one off return flight isn’t going to make a huge difference in the big scheme of things
 

MrFraggle

Distinguished Member
I don‘t factor this in to my travel plans, and I doubt the OP is chartering his own private flight or is a frequent international flyer (but who is these days?).

A one off return flight isn’t going to make a huge difference in the big scheme of things
What, I can hire a private jet, now you tell me? :rotfl:
 

RBZ5416

Distinguished Member
You'll be joking about needing a passport I'm assuming for an internal flight?
You'd need to check specific airline requirements for documentation. Theoretically all you need is photo ID but may find that check-in is online only, requiring a passport.
 

MrFraggle

Distinguished Member
You'd need to check specific airline requirements for documentation. Theoretically all you need is photo ID but may find that check-in is online only, requiring a passport.
You are having a laugh. :)
Ehen did that happen I remember travelling up from Birmingham almost a spur of the moment thing and certainly did not have a passport to hand?
 

RBZ5416

Distinguished Member
You are having a laugh. :)
When did that happen
Some years ago with Ryanair. It started with online check-in being the cheapest option & then switched to being the only option. You couldn't check-in onine without a passport number.

Edit
Checking some old posts it was October 2009. But as I said, it will be airline dependent.
 
Last edited:

MrFraggle

Distinguished Member
Some years ago with Ryanair. It started with online check-in being the cheapest option & then switched to being the only option. You couldn't check-in onine without a passport number.

Edit
Checking some old posts it was October 2009. But as I said, it will be airline dependent.
Having a bit of a Google most airlines do not require a passport for internal flights including Ryanair. So I don't think it will be an issue if I decide to fly.
 

Gaslight

Well-known Member
I don‘t factor this in to my travel plans, and I doubt the OP is chartering his own private flight or is a frequent international flyer (but who is these days?).

A one off return flight isn’t going to make a huge difference in the big scheme of things

Says a lot about you to be honest.

'In the grand scheme of things', every little helps. The ignorance of that statement is severe.

But you know, I only drink one bottle of water in a plastic bottle a week, so I'll chuck it in the Thames afterwards based on that logic, because its only 'one' bottle, won't make a 'huge difference in the big scheme of things'

Sadly, with around 7.7billion people on Earth, everything, however small, has significance.
 

The Dreamer

Distinguished Member
So flying is the best bet for carbon footprint. The flight will operate, with or without you, so carrying you isn’t going to increase that any further. The same could be said for trains of course.

Basically, the more people that we can cram onto planes or trains is better than everyone being in their own transport, i.e. car
 

Gaslight

Well-known Member
So flying is the best bet for carbon footprint. The flight will operate, with or without you, so carrying you isn’t going to increase that any further. The same could be said for trains of course.

Basically, the more people that we can cram onto planes or trains is better than everyone being in their own transport, i.e. car

Not quite, as the level of fuel being used, meaning how much thrust is required etc is based on passengers and luggage weight. It's a complex argument, but I am fairly sure that someone who is more knowledgeable that me and good at physics, would conclude that flying is the least best method for a low carbon footprint.

sighs I wish the train services where better and more afforable, but I think they are probably the best bet environmentally in this case.
 

imightbewrong

Distinguished Member
Looks like there is not a huge amount in it cost-wise at £200-£300 for flights or train, depending on when the travel is.

Skyscanner, google flights, trainline.com are good places to get prices, though for the train tickets trainline.com are always more expensive than the individual providers, after their fee.
 
Last edited:

imightbewrong

Distinguished Member
But you know, I only drink one bottle of water in a plastic bottle a week, so I'll chuck it in the Thames afterwards based on that logic, because its only 'one' bottle, won't make a 'huge difference in the big scheme of things'

I think it is a bit of a stretch to compare mindless littering with travel.
 

rousetafarian

Moderator
Says a lot about you to be honest.

'In the grand scheme of things', every little helps. The ignorance of that statement is severe.

But you know, I only drink one bottle of water in a plastic bottle a week, so I'll chuck it in the Thames afterwards based on that logic, because its only 'one' bottle, won't make a 'huge difference in the big scheme of things'

Sadly, with around 7.7billion people on Earth, everything, however small, has significance.
Stop being antagonistic, shall I publicly criticise you? It would be so easy, but I’m not that judgemental.

Maybe increase your water intake as an aside.
 

rousetafarian

Moderator
Not quite, as the level of fuel being used, meaning how much thrust is required etc is based on passengers and luggage weight. It's a complex argument, but I am fairly sure that someone who is more knowledgeable that me and good at physics, would conclude that flying is the least best method for a low carbon footprint.

sighs I wish the train services where better and more afforable, but I think they are probably the best bet environmentally in this case.
You are arguing with a serving airline pilot, which I find hilarious. Go on……
 

imightbewrong

Distinguished Member
You are arguing with a pilot, which I find hilarious. Go on……

<Pilot taking notes> More weight means more thrust! :facepalm: that's why I kept running out of fuel!
 

MrFraggle

Distinguished Member
Looks like there is not a huge amount in it cost-wise at £200-£300 for flights or train, depending on when the travel is.

Skyscanner, google flights, trainline.com are good places to get prices, though for the train tickets trainline.com are always more expensive than the individual providers, after their fee.
Is there a site that prices these split tickets I have heard much about or is that not a thing now? Last time I got a train was to Leeds and the NHS paid for that.
 

Notorious PIG

Well-known Member
Is there a site that prices these split tickets I have heard much about or is that not a thing now? Last time I got a train was to Leeds and the NHS paid for that.
iirc there was a website called TicketySplit to buy such tickets. Dunno if still in use (and haven’t used them myself).
 

imightbewrong

Distinguished Member

MrFraggle

Distinguished Member
Thanks all will bookmark this thread in the event I need the info later.
 

The Dreamer

Distinguished Member
but I am fairly sure that someone who is more knowledgeable that me and good at physics, would conclude that flying is the least best method for a low carbon footprint.
…that’d be me then! ;)

A typical flight from Edinburgh to London would use around 3000 litres of Jet A1 (diesel).

As a rule of thumb, for every extra ton of fuel we carry on a longhaul flight, we reckon on burning around 20% of that fuel, just to carry it - but that’s on a 10 hour flight. Over a single hour we could roughly equate that to each ton costing us around 2%.

The flight from Edi to LHR is almost exactly one hour, each passenger, with bags weighs roughly 100Kgs, and so each passenger would ‘cost’ roughly 2Kgs of fuel to carry over and above what it’d cost in fuel terms to operate the flight without them.

So 2.5 litres of fuel (specific gravity of Jet A-1 of roughly 0.8) can be attributed to each passenger flown. Pretty efficient if the flight is going anyway!

The total per passenger, on a full flight, is around 17 litres. So the aircraft would be burning 14.5 litres per seat, whether there was anyone in it or not!

Of course, aircraft don’t just carry passengers, we carry quite a lot of time critical freight, and post too - I’ve even carried live organs for transplant.

Even at 17 litres per passenger (worst case), it’s still far more efficient than a car (electric cars aside).

As I say though, if you know the flight is going anyway, travelling on it is only going to ‘cost’ an extra 2.5 litres of fuel - which makes it the cleanest option (with a touch of perverse logic applied, admittedly)!
 

The latest video from AVForums

Podcast: Panasonic JZ2000 Final Thoughts - TV Calibration: Should you? And More...
Subscribe to our YouTube channel

Latest News

What's new on UK streaming services for December 2021
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Best Projectors of 2021 - Editor's Choice Awards
  • By Steve Withers
  • Published
Black Friday 2021: What you need to know
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
What's new on Blu-ray Special - The Cinema of Zhang Yimou & Gong Li
  • By Mark Costello
  • Published
AVForums Podcast: 24th November 2021
  • By Phil Hinton
  • Published

Full fat HDMI teeshirts

Support AVForums with Patreon

Top Bottom