Transition from traditional SLR to D-SLR, couple of questions

Starbucks78

Standard Member
Morning all,

First time posting in this part of the forum and a couple of questins if I may.

It has been nearly a decade since I was reasonably into my photograpy, with a Canon SLR and a variety of fairly good lenses which served me well. I am now considering getting back into the hobby I loved but with D-SLR.

Now upon a window shopping trip to Jessops I was approached by a chap wearing a large pink ribbon over his shoulder looking like he was about to enter a beauty contest, I however gave him the benefit of the doubt and had a chat. He advised me that I would not be able to use any of my old 'Canon' fit lenes with a D-SLR Canon camera due to the Auto Focus. I am not sure I believe him, I understand auto focus will not work as they are manual focus lenses, but surely I can use them in a manual focus mode?
I am sure Auto Focus has its part to play in modern cameras but I enjoy having full control of the camera and focusing myself. To me, I enjoy driving a car and it would be like driving an automatic rather than a manual. Was this chap telling the truth?

My second question is this, how quick are the D-SLRs from the moment you press the button to the when the picture is actually taken? There is what seems like a huge delay with compacts. I have read reviews but never really seems to me a mention of this. As they use a mirror system is it instant?

Sorry for the little essay!

Steve.
 

ncmoody

Novice Member
Not an expert on Canon, however, fairly certain they WILL work, Take a lens into a camera shop (avoid Jessies) and try. Particularly if your Film camera was an EOS.
Modern quality DSLRS like Canon are virtually instantaneous.
I would suggest you look at the mid-range Canons say a 5D, the bottom end have, I understand, a poor reputation. Many people report the 5D to be a superb piece of kit.
 

andy1249

Distinguished Member
Canon D-SLR's follow the EOS system , if your lenses are EF lenses they will work fine on Canon D-SLR's.

Theres no "compact" Type delay. In fact D-SLR's can have a continous shooting speed way in advance of anything you could get with film. Up to 8 shots per second with the 7D , 10 per second with the 1D Mk III , ( sounds like a machine gun ) and so on. Some are faster than others , the slowest speed I can think of right now is 3.5 per second , that would be with the 5D.

You'll be going from a full frame 35mm to an APS-C size unless you start with a 5D.

With Digital SLR's the frame of film you would normally shoot with is replaced by a sensor , making sensors the same size as a frame of film is expensive. As such the 5D Mk II is £2000 + . This would be the cheapest canon full frame option. The Pro cameras are all full frame , but these are very very expensive , 7K + .

You may want to consider the lower options , probably stay away from the likes of the 1000D and aim for either the 50D or the 7D. Both excellent cameras.

APS-C is smaller than a 35mm frame , this may take some getting used to. There will be a 1.6 crop factor to take into account , this will mean that the range of your lenses will be effectively multiplied by that factor.

So for example , a 28 -135mm lens becomes a 45mm - 212mm lens.
A 50mm prime becomes an 80mm prime and so on.
This can be a pain at the lower end , you will have to buy a lens start at 17mm or 18mm to get the same width as a 28mm for example.
 
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eddiewood

Distinguished Member
Morning all,

First time posting in this part of the forum and a couple of questins if I may.

It has been nearly a decade since I was reasonably into my photograpy, with a Canon SLR and a variety of fairly good lenses which served me well. I am now considering getting back into the hobby I loved but with D-SLR.

Now upon a window shopping trip to Jessops I was approached by a chap wearing a large pink ribbon over his shoulder looking like he was about to enter a beauty contest, I however gave him the benefit of the doubt and had a chat. He advised me that I would not be able to use any of my old 'Canon' fit lenes with a D-SLR Canon camera due to the Auto Focus. I am not sure I believe him, I understand auto focus will not work as they are manual focus lenses, but surely I can use them in a manual focus mode?
I am sure Auto Focus has its part to play in modern cameras but I enjoy having full control of the camera and focusing myself. To me, I enjoy driving a car and it would be like driving an automatic rather than a manual. Was this chap telling the truth?

My second question is this, how quick are the D-SLRs from the moment you press the button to the when the picture is actually taken? There is what seems like a huge delay with compacts. I have read reviews but never really seems to me a mention of this. As they use a mirror system is it instant?

Sorry for the little essay!

Steve.
EF system has been around since 1987.

If your lenses auto-focus on your SLR then they will be EF ones and will auto-focus on a new Canon. The whole point of EF is that it is an auto-focus lens, the clue is in the name. :)

Have a look at the lens, is it FD or EF?
 

Starbucks78

Standard Member
Thanks for the replys guys.

My old SLR is older than I expected, it is a Canon AE-1 Program, the first of its type back in the delay I believe. I can confirm it uses FD mount, will the existing lenses work?

I have a 50mm Canon, decent quality. Therefore 80mm ish on D-SLR if it fits.
Good quality 28mm Carl Zeiss.
And a Hanimex (not sure on quality) 70-210mm.

As for a new D-SLR, it would be nice to stick with Canon to use the existing lenses but its not the be all and end all to start again with a different make.

And to be honest I have a 3 year old at home which means budgets are limited, I would be happy with an entry level model I think. I'm sure all the special functions of higher models have there use but I believe the photograpers eye plays the biggest part of decent image.
 

ncmoody

Novice Member
See eBay Item number: 370352037233 £26 inc P&P.
UK FD Lens to Canon EOS MOUNT ADAPTER FOCUS INFINITY

This is the adapter for using Canon FD manual focus lenses on Canon EOS auto focus mount and DIGITAL Cameras by manual focusing under manual exposure control or by using aperture-priority AE.

It allows you to use CANON FD mount lenses and macro accessories on Canon EOS cameras. The lens distance scale can be used as well as the focusing to infinity and the adapter has correction lens inside.
 

andy1249

Distinguished Member
No , FD lenses will not mount onto an EOS camera unfortunately.

There was at one time , an adaptor , but you'll be hard pushed to find one of those now , and even if you did it wouldn't be cheap.

From the Wiki ,

Following the introduction of the EOS camera line, Canon briefly marketed an adapter which enabled FD telephoto lenses to be used on EOS bodies. The adapter contained high-quality corrective optics and functioned as a mild tele-converter; it could not be used on normal and wide-angle lenses. The adapter was produced in limited numbers, with the intent of easing the initial cost of conversion for professional users with expensive FD telephoto lenses. These adapters are now scarce and highly valued, selling for around $1000 on the second-hand market. (The original 'new' price was $250). Other inexpensive aftermarket FD to EOS adapters are available and can be used at the cost of greatly reduced image quality, particularly at large apertures.[
The good news is that this opens up the full range of current SLR's to you. There are many on the market. The best thing to do is go to a shop and hold a few of them , see which one suits your hands the best.

At the lower end of the pricing spectrum , most SLR's are very similar in capability and picture quality, it will really come down to ease of use and how it feels in your hand.
 

Starbucks78

Standard Member
Yeah when in Jessops and talking about Canons the sale chap plonked a 1000D in my hand. I was actually taken back by how light it was, which to me did not impress. It just felt like a lump of plastic with no insides. The manual focus on the kit lens felt very light and flimsy with a thin bezel to adjust with.
I guess I will just to to go and have a play with them, the one I like the feel of and weight is probably the way I'll go, unless any of you guys have some recommendations on what to try out?
I quite like the idea of the Pentax K-x, seems to have good feed back, although not as common.

Thank again.
 

eddiewood

Distinguished Member
Thanks for the replys guys.

My old SLR is older than I expected, it is a Canon AE-1 Program, the first of its type back in the delay I believe. I can confirm it uses FD mount, will the existing lenses work?

I have a 50mm Canon, decent quality. Therefore 80mm ish on D-SLR if it fits.
Good quality 28mm Carl Zeiss.
And a Hanimex (not sure on quality) 70-210mm.

As for a new D-SLR, it would be nice to stick with Canon to use the existing lenses but its not the be all and end all to start again with a different make.

And to be honest I have a 3 year old at home which means budgets are limited, I would be happy with an entry level model I think. I'm sure all the special functions of higher models have there use but I believe the photograpers eye plays the biggest part of decent image.
I'll say the same that I would to somebody looking at using old Minolta MD lenses on their Sony. Don't bother. :D

A canon 50mm is cheap as chips, so it's not worth hanging onto a 50mm FD unless it has a decent max aperture like f1.4. The issue will then be one of quality being affected by the adapter.

You'll probably not find the 28mm useful enough to faff about using an adapter with it.

The Hanimex 70-210mm will be average at best, but most likely mediocre.

I'd dump the lenses you have and choose a system based on what you like the feel of and within budget. If budget is a concern, you may wish to consider a bridge camera rather than dSLR.

Also have a look at www.lcegroup.co.uk for used dSLRs and lenses.
 

Starbucks78

Standard Member
The 50mm Canon is f1.8 at widest. Looks like the lot will go on Ebay and contribute towards some new kit. At the same time it'll be a shame to get rid of it purely for nostalga.
Hhmm, some thinking to do....
 

eddiewood

Distinguished Member
The 50mm Canon is f1.8 at widest. Looks like the lot will go on Ebay and contribute towards some new kit. At the same time it'll be a shame to get rid of it purely for nostalga.
Hhmm, some thinking to do....
There is a *NEW* boxed 50mm f1.8 FD going right now for £5.50, 2 bids, 2 hours to go. Unless there is a sudden rush of bidders :laugh:, it should give you an idea of how much a used one is worth. :)
 

Starbucks78

Standard Member
Ok ok, I get the idea :rolleyes:
My kit is worth next to nothing. Oh well, I'm only 31 so in a few more decades it'll be vintage and worth more. :laugh:
 

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