Tracing the owner of a Wifi network

tads

Standard Member
There is a particular Wifi network which is continuously on, name is **, which is used by

hacker(s) to hack into laptops and desktops.

This particular network is suspect because unlike other networks like Zyxel , Draknet which

are on for some time only, this network is always on.

How do you trace the owner of a Wifi network?
 

spyder viewer

Well-known Member
A network cannot hack into machines on it's own: people have to log onto the network but assuming they have reasonable internet etc security should still be safe. Networks aren't an invisible ray sucking up data from unconnected machines in the area. There is nothing suspicious per se about a network being always on.

Welcome to AVForums by the way.
 

Trollslayer

Distinguished Member
That just means the router is left on, it has nothing to do with the manufacturer of the router.
 
Interesting post - no sure you are understanding how wireless works but thats what we are here for I suppose.

To find where a wireless signal is coming from - At its most basic you need to walk around with your laptop seeing if the signal gets stronger or weaker, maybe using InSSider software or similar. And find the location of the device sending it. As mentioned above your opening statement is questionable my wireless is always on so by your defination I am a hacker ??
 

LJx

Well-known Member
Sounds like the dude just keeps his router switched on like many people lol. If you want to find out where it is coming from you can download a wardriving ap to your phone like Wiggle then walk around with it to work out exactly where the signal is coming from
 

theronkinator

Active Member
I don't know a single person who turns their router off, does this mean they are all hackers? They kept that a secret from me.
 

EndlessWaves

Distinguished Member
As others have mentioned, neither a non-descriptive name (you can set it yourself to whatever your like in your router's options) or a router that's on all the time are particularly uncommon and they certainly aren't signs of anything suspicious.

But if you do have other evidence that there's something suspicious going on then one way to find out the location of the router is to get a directional antenna and then just see which direction you pick it up in. You can buy a directional antenna pretty cheaply, or there are lots of guides for making them yourself. Alternatively, just ask your neighbours are wi-fi range is very short.
 
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beerhunter

Novice Member
There is a particular Wifi network which is continuously on, name is **, which is used by

hacker(s) to hack into laptops and desktops.

This particular network is suspect because unlike other networks like Zyxel , Draknet which

are on for some time only, this network is always on.

How do you trace the owner of a Wifi network?
ignore it. It can't be used to hack other devices.
 

EndlessWaves

Distinguished Member
ignore it. It can't be used to hack other devices.

Unfortunately some devices will automatically connect to any unsecured wireless device they see by default so it's not unreasonable that someone might be taking advantage of this, even if they're not directly hacking the machines.
 

mackerelman

Standard Member
hey tads, zyxel is a default SSID (network name), draknet is most likely a custom name (e.g. mine could be mackerelnet, you can change it to whatever you want, even **, or something more amusing ;))

I'm not sure how you reached the conclusion that it is used to hack into PC's as only PC's that are already connected to it will be visible - so unless you are connected to it I wouldn't worry.

As to finding it, that is much more difficult than it sounds as you don't know how much power the antenna is pumping out, it could be miles away for all you know although most likely it is on your street. There is some software that uses triangulation to put it down to a rough area but it's not that accurate. As EndlessWave said, a directional antenna may help but you would need to get all the way round the property to "prove" it, it could be any number of houses in-line of the direction you are pointing at.

I have an idea but I'll not share it publicly, if at all - I might try it on mine to see if it works first.

Let us know more, as it seems unfounded that it is being used for hacking, hackers use their devices not their networks e.g. they would use their laptop's wifi, they wouldn't use an always-on fixed network from the other side of the internet (or across the street) to attach to your PC, it doesn't work like that, as I said, you would have to be attached to that network to be at risk which is why they would be using a device locally to connect to YOUR network then hop onto your PC.

Unless I've misunderstood you but you are welcome to correct me..
 
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