Toshiba 51 in. Rear Projection TV/HDTV Monitor

Discussion in 'General TV Discussions Forum' started by vr6vdub, Nov 4, 2005.

  1. vr6vdub

    vr6vdub
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    Toshiba 51" HDTV

    Is this a decent TV? It supports all HD modes except 1080p which is understandable. Does anyone have any experience with Toshiba RP televisions? I only ask becuase Sears is selling them for $899 on black Friday (the day after Thanksgiving for the non-Americans). Seems like an awesome way to get started with HD goodness. What do you guys/gals think?
     
  2. vr6vdub

    vr6vdub
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    any suggestions?
     
  3. Snap

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    It's US spec with NTSC.
    Are you going to import it to UK?
     
  4. LV426

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    vr6vdub: The last post is indicative of the fact that the majority of members on this forum are UK based. That's not to say you aren't 100% welcome, but you are unlikely to get much opinion here on US-specific equipment, which this probably is.
     
  5. vr6vdub

    vr6vdub
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    Yes, I am in the US. I didn't realize there was such a difference in model availability across the pond. I may just bite the bullet and get it.

    The spec sheet says it is native 1080i (do non DLP, LCD TV's have a "native" resolution?). Would it have to upscale/downscale for 720p? It seems to have plenty of inputs including HDMI. Some of the display "features" it has are Progressive Scan Doubling, automatic convergance adjustment, and a Digital 4 mega 10 bit 3D Y/C comb filter (whatever that means). Is all that marketing fluff or are they pretty standard HD features?

    Thanks for any help even though you guys may not be familiar with this particular model. Cheers.
     
  6. Snap

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    The only native 1080i sets i am aware of are Hitachi-Fujitsu ALIS plasmas with 1024i and 1080i CRT TV's in USA. the rest are 1080p LCD and DLP's

    i don't know what's in that set
     
  7. LV426

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    CRT-based TVs do not have a "native" resolution, no. Absence of discrete pixels means that, within limits, a CRT is theoretically capable of resolving any resolution with equal ability.
     
  8. ferryman37

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    Does that mean a scaler could be used with a CRT RPTV ? As the front crt blokes use ?
     
  9. LV426

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    Yes, but only within the limitations of the scanning circuitry in the TV. Typically, TVs are more limited in what they are enabled to do than front projectors, but the principles are just the same. You need to find out what it will support, and via which inputs and match your scaler accordingly. If it is fairly old, then it may only support (say) 625 or 525 lines anyway.
     
  10. Welwynnick

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    CRT HDTVs often support 1080i, but not 720p, though there are exceptions. Assuming it will accept and display 1080i, and not 1080p, then you probably wouldn't want to use a scaler, which is principally used for de-interlacing. They are more useful for fixed-pixel displays that have to process say 1080i to display at native. You WOULD need one if you wanted to convert 720p to 1080i, though.

    Nick
     
  11. ferryman37

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    Anyone know what the scanning frq is for a PX3u Sony, analogue ..
    scart only (shame) might be ?? Also when RF is always run down
    why do we have no other way of getting a signal ??
    perplexed .. but interested
     
  12. vr6vdub

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    Well, now I'm really confused. This is from the site....Compatible Inputs:1080i/480p/480i/720p

    Will it accept 1080i and 720p or would I need a scaler for 720p inputs? I guess I shouldn't have to worry about that as my digital cable box outputs 1080i and the Xbox 360 will display either 1080i or 720p(I guess it does all the math).
     
  13. LV426

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    Not quite sure what you mean. If you are wanting to watch broadcast TV then, as you say, it pretty much has to arrive by RF. And that's fine.

    Where RF is to be avoided is as an interconnect method between two bits of gear - like a VCR >> a TV. Used in this way, the signal (for example, from a recorded broadcast)

    a) arrives by RF from the aerial
    b) is converted by the recorder into a recordable signal (eg MPEG video, if it's a digital recorder of some type)
    c) is converted on playback to a watchable signal (eg composite video or RGB)
    d) is then modulated into an RF carrier
    e) is then demodulated by the TV tuner back into a watchable signal


    before it is displayed.

    These last two have a high probability of degrading the signal and are wholly avoidable by using different interconnect methods - RGB, SVideo, Composite, etc., all of which will offer an improvement over RF for interconnects.
     
  14. ferryman37

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    Many thanks for the reply .. which, after 2-3-4- times of reading I think I now follow.
    So .. if I want to watch broadcast TV (SD for now) how can I improve picture quality, and is a javelin stuck to the chimney
    with RF co-axial (??) of about 20mtrs the best we can do given all the fantastic developments of the last few years.
    Aint complaining .. just curious .. can anyone (Nigel) point
    me in a relevant direction ... thanks again ...

    AL
     
  15. LV426

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    If you want to watch broadcast TV then you can do any of the following:

    1: UHF aerial, analog tuner, channels 1...5. This is the "traditional" way. The signal can pretty well always be improved by new aerials, cables and so on. After that, it's down to how good the tuner in your receiver is. Broadcasts are all in 4x3 aspect ratio, although some programming is letterboxed.

    2: UHF aerial, digital tuner. This is freeview. Same aerial*, same downlead, different tuner. Picture quality, assuming good reception is better and worse than analog, at the same time. Better, in that it is free of grain, ghosting and so on and much of it is widescreen 16x9 ratio. Worse in that the digital compression used can cause pixellation effects. If the freeview tuner is in a separate set top box then (here is where the avoid RF bit comes in) it should be connected to your TV using, ideally, an RGB connection. If it's inside the TV (integrated) then connection is internal and not your concern.

    3: Satellite dish and digital satellite receiver. Aka "Sky". Set top box to be connected to TV again, ideally, by RGB. Picture quality broadly the same as Freeview.

    4: Cable service and cable box, connected to TV by RGB. Picture quality broadly the same as Freeview.


    * same fundamental "type" - but may need replacing with a different design for satisfactory Freeview reception.
     
  16. ferryman37

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    So .. if I get a good signal on analogue (which except C5) I do its very likely to be better than other signals ...
    So wait for HD and the analogue switch off I guess, and freeview as a stop gap.

    thanks for your patience ...and time
    AL
     
  17. LV426

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    Sort of. Perhaps more accurate to say, "is likely to have have different things wrong with it".
     

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