Toshiba 32ZP38 component problems!!!

CodeThief

Active Member
eep,

the "Pr" (Red) component phono pulled out of the back of my tosh last night when I was changing component cables :eek: I pushed it back in again but I've now go no red in the picture :oops: :(

Has this happened to anyone else? I'm assuming there's an interface board it connects to somehow.....

Dave
 

JayCee

Distinguished Member
CodeThief said:
eep,

the "Pr" (Red) component phono pulled out of the back of my tosh last night when I was changing component cables :eek: I pushed it back in again but I've now go no red in the picture :oops: :(

Has this happened to anyone else? I'm assuming there's an interface board it connects to somehow.....

Dave
Are you saying the wire came out of the phono plug? or the phono socket came out of the circuit board?
 

Will Scarlet

Well-known Member
I'm assuming you mean the actual socket came out still attached to your component cable. If this is the case I'd suggest it is a repair job. Pushing the socket back into the telly is unlikely to work. And nope, its never happened to me. Fingers crossed.
 

CodeThief

Active Member
The outside of the socket came out of the back of the tv. It has two spiked prongs down the side of it, doesn't look like the socket is soldered together, just pushed. I think the phono socket has come in two. What a pain :(

Dave
 
B

Bombdogs

Guest
I feel obliged to say at this point - be very careful if you decide to dig around in the back of the set to re-attatch the socket - CRT TV's use several thousand volts to fire electrons at the phosphor screen. Even without power, the capacitors, used to acheive these voltages, can keep their charge for days. Get a professional to do it.

PMF
 

CodeThief

Active Member
Bombdogs said:
I feel obliged to say at this point - be very careful if you decide to dig around in the back of the set to re-attatch the socket - CRT TV's use several thousand volts to fire electrons at the phosphor screen. Even without power, the capacitors, used to acheive these voltages, can keep their charge for days. Get a professional to do it.

PMF
Thanks :) but I already have a healthy fear or CRTs, worry not :D

Dave
 

Kalos Geros

Active Member
Lads, the way you put it I'd imagine CRTs to be prehistoric monsters ready to devour you if you came too close...Plasmas and LCDs do seem timid and risk free (not to say easier to move around!!!) hehehe
 

TankTopLover

Well-known Member
Funny this... i have a 32ZP48 and my red component socket 'sticks out' more than the others,its very worrying and i am extremely careful when i need to take them out...
 

TankTopLover

Well-known Member
Kalos Geros said:
Lads, the way you put it I'd imagine CRTs to be prehistoric monsters ready to devour you if you came too close...Plasmas and LCDs do seem timid and risk free (not to say easier to move around!!!) hehehe
LCD's can be just as dangerous.. anything plugged into a socket is potential dangerous tbh... i once got shocked by my alarm clock :(
 

CodeThief

Active Member
stuart69 said:
Funny this... i have a 32ZP48 and my red component socket 'sticks out' more than the others,its very worrying and i am extremely careful when i need to take them out...
Hmm, that's not good :(

Hope yours stays ok though :)

Dave
 
T

Tosher

Guest
CodeThief said:
The outside of the socket came out of the back of the tv. It has two spiked prongs down the side of it, doesn't look like the socket is soldered together, just pushed. I think the phono socket has come in two. What a pain :(

Dave
All the phono sockets in that area are part of a single component, basically a square block of plastic with nine phono sockets attached which is soldered to the main PCB. The outside part of each socket which earths the signal can pull out of the block but will usually work fine if fully reinserted. Take the back cover off the set and push the socket firmly back into the block until it is flush with all the others. Take care to support the back of the block as you do. The input should now work fine.

If this doesn't work then you can always wrap some wire around the red lead and the adjacent blue lead to link the earths together. They are llinked on the PCB anyway so this should not affect PQ.

Let me know how you get on.
 
T

Tosher

Guest
One more thing.......
It's always a good idea to remove phono plugs with a twist rather than trying to pull them straight out.
 

CodeThief

Active Member
Tosher said:
All the phono sockets in that area are part of a single component, basically a square block of plastic with nine phono sockets attached which is soldered to the main PCB. The outside part of each socket which earths the signal can pull out of the block but will usually work fine if fully reinserted. Take the back cover off the set and push the socket firmly back into the block until it is flush with all the others. Take care to support the back of the block as you do. The input should now work fine.

If this doesn't work then you can always wrap some wire around the red lead and the adjacent blue lead to link the earths together. They are llinked on the PCB anyway so this should not affect PQ.

Let me know how you get on.
What a fantastic reply!!! Thanks VERY much, I'll have a go this evening :)

Dave
 

CodeThief

Active Member
Tosher said:
Let me know how you get on.
Fixed it :D :D

After taking the back off the TV and not being able to see anything more than with the back on, I decided to try your wire-wrap idea. Tried it ..... no difference. Hmm, so it's not the ground thats the problem then. I dismantled the phono plug and saw no problems inside. I thought I'd try with a multimeter anyhow and there was no continuity between the center pins of both ends of the Pr cable. Unscrewing the other end of the cable, I saw the center pin had come unsoldered from the plug!!!! I soldered it back together again and it's back to normal!!!

So, it appears that even though the phono ground keeps coming out of the back of the TV, pushing it back it works fine

Thanks for your replies everyone :)

Dave
 

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