Tosh 210e LCD dead

Discussion in 'Blu-ray & DVD Players & Recorders' started by mspiteri, Jun 17, 2002.

  1. mspiteri

    mspiteri
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    Yesterday I discovered that the LCD panel on the DVD's front is dead (completely black), and of course it had to happen one year and four days after I bought it.

    How do they time them to fail exactly as soon as they come out of warranty?

    Normal functionality is fine so it's cosmetic I suppose, albeit still very annoying.

    Has anyone had this happen to them? Any clue whether a simple fix might be possible?

    Cheers
    Mark
     
  2. bagrat

    bagrat
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    Mine failed with the same problem after seven months and has just come back fixed.

    Dealer (Sevenoaks) says problem with blowing capacitors, he has sent in quite a few with this problem.

    Suggect you talk to dealer and Thoshiba, you should get this fixed for free.
     
  3. LV426

    LV426
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    All electronic devices have one or more "widgets" inside. These "widgets" control their behaviour, and come in many different guises.

    The warranty widget is designed to make the device fail after a predetermined period of time. They are normally set in the factory to 12 months. Most retailers who sell extended warranties have an electromagnetic device built into their shop counters, whereby the delay setting in the widget can be increased to, say 60 months (if a +4 year warrantly is purchased) without opening the box. Retailers who do not have such a device receive less commission on the sale of extended warranties.

    Office photocopiers, for example, have a proximity widget. This widget detects the nearby presence of a user. If none is detected, the copier will jam. However, if the user is nearby, it will not.

    Many cars have an "urgency" widget which, by detecting the biometrics of the driver, can determine whether or not to fail to start, based on how urgent/critical the journey is. The more urgent/critical, the greater the likelihood of not starting. Note: Japanese cars do not have this feature.

    There are many more examples.
     

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