To be an audiophile or not?

ShanePJ

Well-known Member
AVForums Sponsor
that it’s best to use the USB connection which is asynchronous
That is correct although I should added the word DAC in place of connection. I’d also say, if you are looking at a DAC, make sure you find one that uses an ASIO driver as this will from my experience produce the best musical reproduction compared to ones using the WASAPI driver

In my very early days of experimenting with software. I started with itunes and although it was good, if you have any compilation CD’s then that’s when it fall down similar to dBpowerAmp. With dBpowerAmp, you can name these files very easily so that issue does not arise. As for EAC, I haven’t used it much, I just found that dBpowerAmp works so well, I never looked anywhere else
 

dogfonos

Well-known Member
@Helix Hifi instead of buying a NAS why don’t you get yourself an external hard drive
As a non-computer expert (although still reasonably savvy, I like to think) who has already gone down the 'CD rip to FLAC on NAS route', I'd agree with the HDD approach.

One aspect barely mentioned when the subject of NAS devices arises is the need for the user to get to grips with the NAS's operating system (or user interface or whatever it's called), the jargon and folder/file architecture/structure - as if understanding the computer's OS wasn't bad enough. This, for me, was an absolute pain. One year on, I still can't pretend to have mastered its idiosyncrasies and still find it frustratingly illogical. I'll name and shame: QNAP. Not for me, but I may have gone too far to turn back.

I believe that NAS devices (or at least QNAP's) are not yet a mass market consumer product - unsure they ever will be. They really are only fit for those with experience in this area, though if an expert sets up the NAS for you (and is on hand to deal with queries), the NAS approach may be viable.
 

bruny

Active Member
I agree @dogfonos. I use a HP Microserver as a NAS. And it can take a bit of maintenance sometimes. As you I’m already committed. Videos, Music, Tv Series, back up PCs, stream to all rooms etc. If I was only going with Music then I would definitely go the external drive route.
 

Helix Hifi

Active Member
This may be stupid... But from understanding CD sound is 16/44kHz so when you rip the cds in flac you well get a perfect cd copy in 16/44kHz. Hence flac we’ll get a bit perfect cd copy. Same sound quality I mean. But here’s my question? I read online that it is merely impossibly to get the same cd sound that is stored on those shine silver disc, sometimes gold also. And when is flac considered lossless vs lossy which CD is? Around 96/192kHz? Although the bit rate goes alway up to 24/192kHz. That’s the same as SACD, MQA. I’ve heard high Res sound, but I wasn’t super impressed. Am I the only one?
 

phil t

Well-known Member
Sure you can get the same quality as cd. If nothing else, rip as wav. Flac is also supposed to be equal to cd quality.
 

Helix Hifi

Active Member
Sure you can get the same quality as cd. If nothing else, rip as wav. Flac is also supposed to be equal to cd quality.
Yes, I’ve heard too. But there are people who says no. Like on the Steve Hoffman forum. Wav is what cd sound is based on, but you don’t get metadata then (album art) but this just guessing from regarding sound quality. Flac well probably sound just fine😀.
 

phil t

Well-known Member
I
Yes, I’ve heard too. But there are people who says no. Like on the Steve Hoffman forum. Wav is what cd sound is based on, but you don’t get metadata then (album art) but this just guessing from regarding sound quality. Flac well probably sound just fine😀.
I would just be regurgitating, but the L in flac stands for lossless, as in no loss of source data.
 

mr_yogi

Well-known Member
*** FLAC is lossless, if ripped correctly it is exactly the same as the original CD, or digital high res file. It's the exact same data, it is a computer file. You can perfectly recreate the original .wav file. Just like unzipping a word document or computer program. How is this still in question? This s##t was going around 15 years ago :(
 

Helix Hifi

Active Member
I see. Flac, or ALAC it is depending on which operating system I chose. Apple is tempting. Wav, strange there is no metadata options out there if I rip my cds in Wav.
 

phil t

Well-known Member
If you have Apple products then ALAC, if not then FLAC?

I use EAC (exact audio copy) and rip to flac, but that suits my circumstances.
 

toon10

Active Member
I don't class myself as an audiophile and my system is not high end but I do like Hi-Fi and sound quality is important to me. I use Spotify Premium. I like the app and the library is the best I've tried among the services. I tried Tidal but didn't really notice much difference back to back. As a blind test, one or two tracks did sound clearer on Tidal but I guessed wrong a few times and others sounded no different to my middle aged ear.

The killer for Tidal was I tried to replicate a playlist I have in Spotify and their library only had about 1/3 of the tracks. I'm not one for chart music, rap or mainstream stuff but Spotify seems to cater for a lot of my more rare eclectic tastes.

I have also ripped my CD collection to FLAC using a 256GB thumbnail USB plugged into my amp (and one in my car and one on my BlueSound Mini in another room) I find this really convenient but again, my ears don't really pick up much quality difference!
 

Helix Hifi

Active Member
Yes, many options. Flac or ALAC. Their the same. I need to rip my cds soon. When I don’t know. I know now what I need from software and hardware. Been googling a lot! At first I was like I was looking at some rocket science thing. Didn’t understand a thing! I remember still back to this day my dealer had all he’s stuff on NAS. Man that shop was great. Too bad it went out of business. But I was handed an iPad, “Just write Floyd, you’ll find them”. And I did. Dire straits, Eagles, Stones, Nirvana Unplugged. Then the last 5 years I used Bluesound. It was a bit nerve wracking getting my new baby back home, but I got it online. I think the Node2i is excellent for its use. You can connect a NAS, USB. But I agree maybe USB hard drive could be an idea. But I never gotten a reasonable answer from Bluesound if I can use the USB input on my Node2i. Otherwise their support have been very good. It’s just that Bluesound from my understanding that their USB input is for music on the go. Not for ripping around 700 cds. Bluesound suggested a NAS, or a USB hard drive. But then I needed to use my router as file sharing, not my Node2i. The Node2i may also need some time reindex music. Index vs reindex, what do those to things mean? Thanks guys i appreciate a lot.
 
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mark6226

Well-known Member
There's no such thing as an audiophile mate. It's a made up snobbery term.
there are those who like music, hifi etc and those who don't.
attach the term audiophile to a recording and you double the price.
We live in a world where many are obsessed with facile things like keeping up with the neighbours etc.
I think if anyone ever said to me face to face that they were an audiophile, that id laugh.
 

daddy999

Active Member
hmm., I appreciate music, I like good sound from my hifi, I spend within my means to achieve pleasure from my music collection on CD, Vinyl, streaming, and yes, that even includes Spotify. So, does does that make me an audiophile? God, I hope not.
 

phil t

Well-known Member
hmm., I appreciate music, I like good sound from my hifi, I spend within my means to achieve pleasure from my music collection on CD, Vinyl, streaming, and yes, that even includes Spotify. So, does does that make me an audiophile? God, I hope not.
Not Slytherin, not Slytherin, not Slytherin, not Slytherin...…...

:D
 

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