To all owners of a 37" or 40" LCD screen - opinions required...

Discussion in 'LCD & LED LCD TVs Forum' started by Shwing, Dec 19, 2006.

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  1. Shwing

    Shwing
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    Hi.

    I would love to hear the opinions of anyone who has either a 37" or 40" LCD screen as to which size you think would be best suited to my needs.

    My most often used viewing position is approx 10 Feet / 3 Metres from the screen, and I would be using the tv for hi-def gaming (Xbox 360, and possibly PS3 later), freeview and DVDs.

    I know there are conversion tables etc in order to work out distances, but I would rather hear 'real life' experiences. It's just that I don't want to get a screen that would be too overpowering - or not big enough :rolleyes:

    Finally, bearing in mind my proposed uses and the current 'newness' of 1080p screens, would it be better going for a good (cheaper) 720p screen now, and changing to a second/third generation 1080p screen down the line?

    Thanks.
     
  2. iainl2005

    iainl2005
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    To be honest with you I bought a toshiba wlt66 37" LCD and it is good but not great, if I was going for a new screen I would invest in a 50" Plasma, the 37" LCD is good but I felt I was moving my chair that close to the TV to see the sharpness of the graphics on my 360 that I was almost sitting on my coffee table. I wouldn’t get hung up on the 1080P sets at the moment, get yourself a really good 720P set rather than buying a first generation inferior 1080P set (and breaking the bank getting it, prices will fall by the end of next year).
    In my opinion if you are going to a screen size over 32" then get Plasma especially if you are playing games, everything moves on the screen much smoother and faster, contrast is much better as well, new screens seem to be better with the dreaded screenburn too.
     
  3. MarkusThatch

    MarkusThatch
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    I get a bit confused about the 720 v 1080 issue. How can you tell whether a tv is 720 or 1080? Is this usually included in the tech spec? This is something different from horizontal and vertical resolution isn't it? Hlep!:lease:
     
  4. PeteD64

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    When you see people talking about LCDs & 720p/1080p they are probably talking about the vertical resolution so yes just look at the technical specs.
    Large screen LCDs typically have 1920x1080 or 1366x768 pixel resolution.

    There is the added complication of which types of input signal does the TV handle, e.g. a lot of 1080 line TVs that are often labelled 1080p can't take a 1080p(rogressive) signal, only 1080i(nterlaced) & even if it does do 1080p it may be limited to one input type. If the TV is classed as HD Ready then it must be able to handle 720p & 1080i signals at 50 & 60hz & have at least 720 physical lines of resolution.

    There's lots of discussion about how close to the screen you actually need to be to see the extra detail in 1920x1080. Also which resolution works best with which source e.g. HD-DVD/Blu-Ray are natively 1080p (1920x1080), Sky HD is 1080i but that may equate to 1440x540. Xbox 360 games are supposed to be 720p (1280x720) but most of our TV is still in 576i format so will that look any good if scaled up to 1920x1080?

    At the end of the day there isn't one resolution that works best for everything so it's hard to make a decision. It's probably more important how good the picture processing/scaling is in the set & what it can do with the sources you use. If you're serious about it then an external video processor box is the way to go but they cost as much if not more than a good TV.
     

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