Tips for fitting jvc projector to space between ceiling joints

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by Sunshinewelly, Nov 7, 2017.


    1. Sunshinewelly

      Sunshinewelly
      Well-known Member

      Joined:
      Dec 1, 2005
      Messages:
      4,987
      Products Owned:
      0
      Products Wanted:
      0
      Trophy Points:
      106
      Ratings:
      +435
      In my living room my joists are running parallel to my rear wall where I need to fit a peerless mount. The mount has 2 fixing points but the joist closest to the wall is too close to mount to and the one in front is too close to screen for my throw distance. I was thinking of putting a piece of wood between these joints and fixing mount to the wood. However I don't want to use a very thick piece of wood as my wife would hate that. Any tips for securing a mount to that piece of wood taking into account it only will have 2 fixing points.
       
    2. John7

      John7
      Well-known Member

      Joined:
      Aug 6, 2004
      Messages:
      2,439
      Products Owned:
      0
      Products Wanted:
      0
      Trophy Points:
      116
      Ratings:
      +686
      Do you have access to the joists above the ceiling? If you do, you could install a couple of noggins between the two existing joists and mount the projector bracket directly to them through the ceiling. No need for a piece of wood on the ceiling then.

      If you don't have access above, then rather than using a piece of wood, get one or two of these (depends what length you need to span across the joists)

      Wickes Single Slot Upright Bracket White 2000mm | Wickes.co.uk

      Screw these to the joists the appropriate width apart to suit your mount. Then mark the mount position on them. Take them down from the ceiling, drill and bolt your mount directly to them, then re-fit to the ceiling with mount attached
       
      Last edited: Nov 8, 2017
    3. toddy28

      toddy28
      Well-known Member

      Joined:
      Aug 20, 2007
      Messages:
      3,634
      Products Owned:
      0
      Products Wanted:
      0
      Trophy Points:
      136
      Ratings:
      +684
    4. toddy28

      toddy28
      Well-known Member

      Joined:
      Aug 20, 2007
      Messages:
      3,634
      Products Owned:
      0
      Products Wanted:
      0
      Trophy Points:
      136
      Ratings:
      +684
      A quick google for a steel plate and I actually found a peerless mount that spans the joists
       
    5. Sunshinewelly

      Sunshinewelly
      Well-known Member

      Joined:
      Dec 1, 2005
      Messages:
      4,987
      Products Owned:
      0
      Products Wanted:
      0
      Trophy Points:
      106
      Ratings:
      +435
      So I attach the plate by drilling a hole into each bracket or 2 into the same bracket and use a bolt and nut to fix plate and then attach that shelf support to ceiling into the joists
       
    6. John7

      John7
      Well-known Member

      Joined:
      Aug 6, 2004
      Messages:
      2,439
      Products Owned:
      0
      Products Wanted:
      0
      Trophy Points:
      116
      Ratings:
      +686
      Yep, that would be my thinking (as an engineering type person)!

      Ideally, you need to fit the wickes bracket to the ceiling first so you can measure/mark the correct location for your PJ mount. Then take the wickes down, drill and fit the PJ braket then reattach the whole lot to the ceiling. Make sure you fit the wickes bracket open side to ceiling, then the bolts for the PJ mount will sit inside the channel, not against the ceiling.
       
    7. Supersonic

      Supersonic
      Active Member

      Joined:
      Jan 5, 2005
      Messages:
      1,054
      Products Owned:
      0
      Products Wanted:
      0
      Trophy Points:
      66
      Location:
      Surrey
      Ratings:
      +148
      That's what I did for my projector screen which weighs 40kg and it's rock solid. But I had access from above (and below) to fit them.

      That Wickes bracket looks a good cost-effective alternative and TBH once everything's up you get used to it quite quickly anyway.
       
    8. stevelup

      stevelup
      Well-known Member

      Joined:
      Aug 13, 2002
      Messages:
      6,560
      Products Owned:
      1
      Products Wanted:
      1
      Trophy Points:
      136
      Location:
      Swindon
      Ratings:
      +1,111
      My suggested 'invisible' way of doing this is to make a round hole in the ceiling that is just slightly smaller than the projector bracket.

      Now get a piece of wood the same width as the hole and half insert a screw right in the middle. Depending on your joist height, you should be able to get about 300-400 mm of length.

      Poke this wood up through the hole and let it drop back flat on the inside of the ceiling.

      Now, position it so that it is centred over the hole using the screw you placed earlier. You can now apply downward pressure on that screw whilst popping a couple of screws through the plasterboard into the wood. Your piece of wood is now secured to the inside of the plasterboard ceiling. Remove the middle screw.

      Now, if you like, you can screw back the bit of plasterboard you cut out.

      Finally, you can screw the projector bracket through the plasterboard and into the wood.

      You have now spread the load across a wider area of the plasterboard, and you are avoiding using risky plasterboard fixings. All at the same time as avoiding any ugly bits of wood or pieces of shelving.
       
    9. Sunshinewelly

      Sunshinewelly
      Well-known Member

      Joined:
      Dec 1, 2005
      Messages:
      4,987
      Products Owned:
      0
      Products Wanted:
      0
      Trophy Points:
      106
      Ratings:
      +435

      Hi - that sounds a great idea - couple of questions before i make the hole. when you say get a piece of wood the same size as hole i assume you dont mean a batten but rather lets say for example the width of hole is 10 cm - i use a just under 10 cm wide x 30 cm square piece of wood and push that through the hole so its resting over the hole. I then pull down on the middle screw and then screw through the ceiling into the wood so that the wood inside the ceiling cavity is then pulled tight against the inside of the ceiling. i assume that plasterboard is strong enough to take the weight of the JVC pulling the wood against the plasterboard?
       
    10. Sunshinewelly

      Sunshinewelly
      Well-known Member

      Joined:
      Dec 1, 2005
      Messages:
      4,987
      Products Owned:
      0
      Products Wanted:
      0
      Trophy Points:
      106
      Ratings:
      +435
      going back to this invisible method - my concern is that the projector is 15kg so will the plasterboard hold that without splitting (could the whole board not be pulled down)
       
    11. stevelup

      stevelup
      Well-known Member

      Joined:
      Aug 13, 2002
      Messages:
      6,560
      Products Owned:
      1
      Products Wanted:
      1
      Trophy Points:
      136
      Location:
      Swindon
      Ratings:
      +1,111
      Yes, you want the longest bit of wood you can thread through the hole. There will be a limit how long this can be because of the depth of your upstairs joists. You could use Pythagoras or trial and error ;)

      15kg spread out will be fine. Remember, you're right between two joists. The plasterboard will have multiple fixings to the joists and has probably been jointed and plastered as well. It's much stronger stuff than you'd give it credit for. Where it fails is if you use little fixings that pull out.
       
    12. Sunshinewelly

      Sunshinewelly
      Well-known Member

      Joined:
      Dec 1, 2005
      Messages:
      4,987
      Products Owned:
      0
      Products Wanted:
      0
      Trophy Points:
      106
      Ratings:
      +435
      If I use a board as an option then what type should I use and how thick should it be. I looked at the bracket option and the holes on bracket are too far apart to go into joints. As the projector is so big it will probably hide any board I use. Tempted to bolt the ceiling plate to suitable board and screw board onto joints. Although the bolts then will be digging into ceiling
       
    13. dfdd

      dfdd
      Active Member

      Joined:
      Oct 18, 2008
      Messages:
      1,073
      Products Owned:
      0
      Products Wanted:
      0
      Trophy Points:
      63
      Ratings:
      +201
      hollow wall anchors- fischer?-will do the trick-search my posts for a video i posted on a similar thread . no plate required
       
    14. jfinnie

      jfinnie
      Well-known Member

      Joined:
      Oct 1, 2004
      Messages:
      4,026
      Products Owned:
      0
      Products Wanted:
      0
      Trophy Points:
      133
      Location:
      Norwich
      Ratings:
      +1,543
      One thing to watch for I've found - my plasterboard wasn't in direct contact with the joists - it may have sagged on the nails a little. If you then screw in a flat bracket tight to a joist you can find the plasterboard gets pushed back up to the joist, and "pops" the plaster skim where the nails were. Annoying.

      I had access above so I put an inch thick piece of MDF between the joists and used angled brackets to grip the MDF and the joists, then used large wood screws x4 to attach the bracket to the MDF. DSC_2347.JPG
       
    15. Sunshinewelly

      Sunshinewelly
      Well-known Member

      Joined:
      Dec 1, 2005
      Messages:
      4,987
      Products Owned:
      0
      Products Wanted:
      0
      Trophy Points:
      106
      Ratings:
      +435
      How heavy is your projector. Did you have to use bolts through mdf or simple screws. I would be concerned the weight would pull screws out of the wood. I assume the thicker the board the better grip the screws will have
       
    16. Sunshinewelly

      Sunshinewelly
      Well-known Member

      Joined:
      Dec 1, 2005
      Messages:
      4,987
      Products Owned:
      0
      Products Wanted:
      0
      Trophy Points:
      106
      Ratings:
      +435
      Don't fancy putting my faith in wall anchors
       
    17. jfinnie

      jfinnie
      Well-known Member

      Joined:
      Oct 1, 2004
      Messages:
      4,026
      Products Owned:
      0
      Products Wanted:
      0
      Trophy Points:
      133
      Location:
      Norwich
      Ratings:
      +1,543
      It's an x30, so basically same weight as any Jvc. It is only 4kilos per screw, and the screws are massive. I did think about using bolts but it seemed like massive overkill. I used screws which were long enough to go all the way through the MDF
       
    18. Russ 66

      Russ 66
      Well-known Member

      Joined:
      Jan 5, 2004
      Messages:
      1,783
      Products Owned:
      0
      Products Wanted:
      0
      Trophy Points:
      116
      Location:
      Norfolk
      Ratings:
      +1,127
      Taking up the floor above is the proper way to do it, who knows what pipes and cables are there.
      I am sure what jfinnie has done is fine, especially with the low loads but MDF does not hold screws particularly well. A couple of bits of 2"x4" (layed flat) or similar would be a safer bet and take a longer screw.
       
      • Like Like x 1
      • Agree Agree x 1
      • List
    19. swiftpete

      swiftpete
      Well-known Member

      Joined:
      Sep 30, 2006
      Messages:
      4,789
      Products Owned:
      0
      Products Wanted:
      1
      Trophy Points:
      136
      Location:
      Notts
      Ratings:
      +1,005
      I wouldn’t want a projector that sits above my head to be held by plasterboard only. Span the joists. If you don’t want to take the floor up, just paint a bit of wood the same colour as the ceiling. Once in place you’ll barely see it.
       
    20. dfdd

      dfdd
      Active Member

      Joined:
      Oct 18, 2008
      Messages:
      1,073
      Products Owned:
      0
      Products Wanted:
      0
      Trophy Points:
      63
      Ratings:
      +201
      evidence says they will hold no problem-i have used them to great effect. there is a fischer table somewhere that gives the spec for different thickness of plasterboard.
      it saves taking up carpets floorboards etc.
      why not do a dummy mockup on a piece of plasterboard with the fischer screws? that will give you the confidence to use them.
       
    21. jfinnie

      jfinnie
      Well-known Member

      Joined:
      Oct 1, 2004
      Messages:
      4,026
      Products Owned:
      0
      Products Wanted:
      0
      Trophy Points:
      133
      Location:
      Norwich
      Ratings:
      +1,543
      Agree with all that. The MDF and long screws were what I had to hand at the time. Doing it again I'd probably go for bolts, but of course it involves the services of a helper to get them tightened.
       
    22. Sunshinewelly

      Sunshinewelly
      Well-known Member

      Joined:
      Dec 1, 2005
      Messages:
      4,987
      Products Owned:
      0
      Products Wanted:
      0
      Trophy Points:
      106
      Ratings:
      +435
      Probably will go for a decent piece of plywood which is stronger than mdf and will use t fasteners so I can bolt the mount to board and then screw that into 2 joists. There is no way I would trust plasterboard fixings
       
    23. Thatsnotmynaim

      Thatsnotmynaim
      Well-known Member

      Joined:
      Jun 21, 2004
      Messages:
      3,746
      Products Owned:
      0
      Products Wanted:
      0
      Trophy Points:
      137
      Location:
      Middle Earth
      Ratings:
      +629
      If you have access from above to do MDF or plywood, then why not just go the whole hog and put in timber, it'll be cheaper than 18mm plywood and I imagine much stronger also, any sheet mdf or ply can sag especially if under load, say a 15kg projector.

      If it were me I would buy 2x3" (C16 47x125 @ £5.99 for 2.4m from Wickes) put two side strips sat or virtually sat on the plasterboard but securely screwed into the joists with 3 or 4 strong long screws (Ulti-Mate II stick fit ones from Wickes, say 6mm x 80 or 90mm which are brilliant), you'll need to drill small pilot holes first say 2-3mm probably.

      Then cut a noggin beam to sit on top of the strips, which will need to be the size to fit inside your joist gap (so ~400-600mm etc), leave a bit of slack (2-3mm) for wiggle room rather than making something you have to hammer into place.
      Then make another beam not so long to sit below the hung beam, between the side strips which will effectively touch the plasterboard and will be for the mount to securely screw into.
      Then securely screw the lower noggin to the upper noggin, and screw the whole thing in place to the side beams and screw the mount from below into the noggins.
       
    24. Thatsnotmynaim

      Thatsnotmynaim
      Well-known Member

      Joined:
      Jun 21, 2004
      Messages:
      3,746
      Products Owned:
      0
      Products Wanted:
      0
      Trophy Points:
      137
      Location:
      Middle Earth
      Ratings:
      +629
      Drawing1.jpg
       
    25. Sunshinewelly

      Sunshinewelly
      Well-known Member

      Joined:
      Dec 1, 2005
      Messages:
      4,987
      Products Owned:
      0
      Products Wanted:
      0
      Trophy Points:
      106
      Ratings:
      +435
      thanks for that detailed plan - thats brilliant. i will take a look upstairs tonight to see if i can get to the ceiling below.
       
    26. Thatsnotmynaim

      Thatsnotmynaim
      Well-known Member

      Joined:
      Jun 21, 2004
      Messages:
      3,746
      Products Owned:
      0
      Products Wanted:
      0
      Trophy Points:
      137
      Location:
      Middle Earth
      Ratings:
      +629
      No problem, it's similar to what we did for my screen as we sunk it into the ceiling, hung from noggins in the same way so it disappears completely when retracted. The hardest bit was getting the floorboards upstairs up, we had to cut them in a straight line very carefully with a circular saw set to an exact depth (~18mm) so as not to cut into the joists. We cut them in such a way that where they were cut was exactly half way between the joist so the two sides that were left can evenly sit on and be screwed back to the joists. Worked great and now I can pull the floor up every time I change my screen, 3 times so far in the past 18 months! :)
      Some of the floor boards we just replaced with a single piece of board, so it's less fiddly to get up and put back as it's 5 pieces rather than 20 odd boards, but for a smaller hole that's neither here nor there.
      If you do not have access to a circular saw then I've previously used a multi-cutter (~£30) with a square vibrating edge that cuts through stuff like butter, although it's trickier to get a long straight line with that, although may be ok for a small area like this.
       
    27. stevelup

      stevelup
      Well-known Member

      Joined:
      Aug 13, 2002
      Messages:
      6,560
      Products Owned:
      1
      Products Wanted:
      1
      Trophy Points:
      136
      Location:
      Swindon
      Ratings:
      +1,111
      That's very good, no doubt, but way OTT for a 15kg projector!
       
    28. Thatsnotmynaim

      Thatsnotmynaim
      Well-known Member

      Joined:
      Jun 21, 2004
      Messages:
      3,746
      Products Owned:
      0
      Products Wanted:
      0
      Trophy Points:
      137
      Location:
      Middle Earth
      Ratings:
      +629
      As I said 'IF' you have access, then ply is more expensive, less strong and has less to anchor to than much cheaper solid wood. Solid wood is not only cheaper but it's easier to transport, stiffer and stronger. All you need is a few screws instead of brackets and screws etc also.
      I wasn't criticising others ideas, just saying here's another option. I accept that the solution may be OTT for the masses involved, but it's just as simple in practice (if you have access), cheap and will give a very solid footing for no extra work. Look at the design of many HiFi Racks and Shelves, they're all OTT but very solid.
      As I said 'if' you're going to pull the floorboards up you may wish to consider what I did for my screen, people are free to dismiss and ignore, just sharing what I did to throw an idea out there.
      I would personally wouldn't want to chance just using plasterboard, but others may. I did with a light BenQ ages back, but I never felt fully happy and with something much more expensive I simply wouldn't risk it.
      I like your idea with spreading the load and think it's ingenious, but I personally probably wouldn't use that either. If I hadn't seen the plasterboard going up and didn't know it's age, how it was fixed or if it had/hadn't previously had any water damage, I wouldn't fully trust it with a £4k plus PJ. Then again if you look in my garage and see the shelves I built, you'll see they're massively ott, but then again I put very heavy things on them like 40kg tents and they don't move. :)
       
    29. stevelup

      stevelup
      Well-known Member

      Joined:
      Aug 13, 2002
      Messages:
      6,560
      Products Owned:
      1
      Products Wanted:
      1
      Trophy Points:
      136
      Location:
      Swindon
      Ratings:
      +1,111
      Not criticising your suggestion at all - my projector screen is mounted in a similar way. It certainly will never fall down!
       
    30. Russ 66

      Russ 66
      Well-known Member

      Joined:
      Jan 5, 2004
      Messages:
      1,783
      Products Owned:
      0
      Products Wanted:
      0
      Trophy Points:
      116
      Location:
      Norfolk
      Ratings:
      +1,127
      Wow that look overkill, why don't you just put a noggin in between the joists.
      So you have a piece of wood between the joists and then just screw through the joists into the wood.
       

    Share This Page

    Loading...
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice