This is blatantly a Facebook Marketplace scammer

121

Active Member
I just listed an item on Facebook Marketplace for £68 and got this within minutes. I only have 2 items listed in total.

Hi, is this available?

You sent​


Hi, yes it is

Hannah​


How much is the last stated price

You sent​


It's £68 until sold

Hannah​


How are you willing to get paid

You sent​


Did you want it posted or would you like to collect?

Hannah​


I want it posted

Hannah​


To leceister

You sent​


Ok, you can pay with PayPal.

Hannah​


But I would prefer bank transaction

It would be safe for both of us

You sent​


Hi, sorry I only accept PayPal.

Hannah​


Okay

Can I have your details

And your email for the confirmation of the payment

You sent​


Sorry for wasting your time. This is now sold.

Hannah​


Okay if you have any available item for sale

You can reach me
 

rousetafarian

Moderator
Common tactics, thanks for highlighting and worth considering when using any classifieds platform including ours
 

Goooner

Distinguished Member
Same. I’d have thought bank transfer was safe wasn’t it? You can see the money in your account.
 

rousetafarian

Moderator
Same. I’d have thought bank transfer was safe wasn’t it? You can see the Imoney in your account.
I’d prefer not to give my bank details to a stranger online. Get the money sent over as Paypal Friends and Family, no fees and no chance of clawback
 

Unlucky Alf

Well-known Member
I had what seems like a similar scam on FB marketplace yesterday. Had an iPad listed, and someone offered to buy it as follows;

“Okay I want you to ship it to my brother wife son in Uk 🇬🇧 Payment will be paid upfront to you. and offer you extra £20 for the shipping handling and Insurance.”

I didn’t bother answering.
 

mjn

Distinguished Member
“Brother’s wife’s son”? :eek:

Sure buddy. Sure. :laugh:
 

mckee74

Distinguished Member
I’d prefer not to give my bank details to a stranger online. Get the money sent over as Paypal Friends and Family, no fees and no chance of clawback
Irony being that if someone asked me to pay them by PayPal F&F I'd be thinking scam!
 

scottydog

Active Member
No way I’d be passing anything other than my basic details to the nutters on Facebook marketplace. The hassle I got when selling a sofa was unbelievable. The ranting and raving because I sold it before some people had bothered to get off their backside to see it was laughable.
 

chenks

Well-known Member
How much is the last stated price

this line alone, the wording used and the way it's phrased is always the tell tale sign.
 

leamspaceman

Distinguished Member
So much technological advancement in the ability to buy and sell online... and yet it's safer to buy from someone selling out of a suitcase on a street corner.

Who'd have thought???
 

imightbewrong

Distinguished Member
I’d prefer not to give my bank details to a stranger online.

It's funny as these are all the same bank details that are written on every cheque ever handed out - when they were still a thing ofc
 

Doug the D

Distinguished Member
It's funny as these are all the same bank details that are written on every cheque ever handed out - when they were still a thing ofc

I'm not entirely sure what use a sort code and account number is to a scammer anyway. What are they going to do, put a load of cash in my account?
 

mjn

Distinguished Member

brunation

Well-known Member
I'm not entirely sure what use a sort code and account number is to a scammer anyway.
The scammer needs your name too for confirmation of payee ......

Are they going to pay more money in and get it sent back clean?
Have they a dubious account they want to transfer the money out of?

Baby steps to explain the scam please ......
 

rousetafarian

Moderator
I suppose a sort code plus account number + bank account holder’s name is all you need for a rogue standing order or direct debit to be set up…..couldn’t care less tbh, I’d never use FB marketplace
 

Doug the D

Distinguished Member
The scammer needs your name too for confirmation of payee ......

Are they going to pay more money in and get it sent back clean?
Have they a dubious account they want to transfer the money out of?

Baby steps to explain the scam please ......

I'm not clued up on money laundering tbh. I know it's to 'clean' money, but I'm not sure how entirely. To assume either of your scenarios; someone sends me extra money in 'error' and I then refund them the overpayment - in what way am I out of pocket or in danger of having money taken from my account without permission?
 

Doug the D

Distinguished Member
That's what I thought too .... so are they using the details to setup a Direct Debit to pay for a phone?

But surely you (as the genuine account holder) would get notification of this and cancel it immediately?

I'm not sure about anyone else's banks, but with the HSBC, there's a myriad of security hoops to jump through, whether you're sending someone a one-off payment to cover the cost of a coffee, or setting up a new direct debit or standing order. Having my sort code, account number and name simply wouldn't work.
 

brunation

Well-known Member
in what way am I out of pocket or in danger of having money taken from my account without permission?
You're not. Your account is now tied to the fraudulent activity. You need to explain this down the station that your FB marketplace purchase of $stuff was legitimate.
 
Last edited:

Doug the D

Distinguished Member
Isn't that what Jeremy Clarkson once said......?


Not to labour the point about security, but that article was written 13 years ago, things have certainly moved on hugely since then. I'm not going to be as daft as to put my personal bank details on this forum, but I wonder how much damage would be done to my bank balance if I did? I suspect zero, but I'm not confident enough to try and repeat Clarkson's stunt!
 

mjn

Distinguished Member
Not to labour the point about security, but that article was written 13 years ago, things have certainly moved on hugely since then. I'm not going to be as daft as to put my personal bank details on this forum, but I wonder how much damage would be done to my bank balance if I did? I suspect zero, but I'm not confident enough to try and repeat Clarkson's stunt!
Yes. It was a while back and things have improved. Thankfully.
 

ChuckMountain

Distinguished Member
But surely you (as the genuine account holder) would get notification of this and cancel it immediately?

I'm not sure about anyone else's banks, but with the HSBC, there's a myriad of security hoops to jump through, whether you're sending someone a one-off payment to cover the cost of a coffee, or setting up a new direct debit or standing order. Having my sort code, account number and name simply wouldn't work.

Why would you notification though. Sure if you happened to check then yes you would see dodgy DD. I am also with HSBC and yes you have to jump through a load of hoops as you say but aren't DD normally set up from the receiving persons point of view.

So as an example there are various websites that I supply my name and bank details, plus address to setup a DD. Equally, I can still fill in a paper form to do so in some cases. That just has the address of my bank and not my own. I don't get a notification from the bank to say one has been setup.
 

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