Thinking of moving to work in the U.S / Australia

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by dalboy, Sep 13, 2007.

  1. dalboy

    dalboy
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    Hi guys thought id ask in here as so many people read this forums.

    Just recently ive been thinking of moving to either the U.S or Australia to work permanently / ongoing.

    I work in London at the mo and been doing I.T Support (range of I.T. skills acrued) for 3 years now with a Degree in Computing as well. I love my job, but other things in life are starting to cheese me off.

    I love the U.S and never been australia so was thinking of doing what i am good at over there. I will be on my own so Ill have to sort accomodation out and apply for jobs before hand.

    Was wondering if anyone else has been in the same boat or have any good sites to look at for advice. I know its a big step but no harm looking into it.

    Thanks, sorry if its a bit random!
     
  2. Paul_HDLover

    Paul_HDLover
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    Theres more IT work in Australia than you can shake a big stick at! Go contracting! Google - IT Jobs Australia and you will get the main recruitment websites crammed with jobs. You can work under a working visa for up to 3 months at a time in the same place and most companies will happily take IT people who are on working holidays.
     
  3. dalboy

    dalboy
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    wow thanks for the quick reply

    is there such companies that find jobs for you AND accomodation?
     
  4. Paul_HDLover

    Paul_HDLover
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    Don't know about that mate. I've looked into it aswell and was off the opinion that Id need to sort my own accomodation. Agencies and such like would probably strive to find you a job if you registered with them. They do that here anyway so I assume its not any different in that respect.

    You can apply for a working visa which lasts for 12 months. It has conditions on it to restrict you from staying i.e. you must not work for the same employer for more than 3 months. The way I see it, IT is the best industry for this, particularly if your already climatised to contracting. What could be better?
     
  5. dalboy

    dalboy
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    well i dont really like the idea of working 3 months at a time i.e. having to find new roles every 3 months. just wanted something minimum 12 months etc... but maybe the 3 months at a time is a good thing. i really dont know. i wouldnt want to be in the situation of being out of work, running out of money and having to come back home obviously.

    also will employers want to take someone on only for 3 months? i guess that question is answered when just going for contract jobs...
     
  6. williemaykit

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    Take it from an Aussie. When you live overseas you learn to budget - not everyone does but for me it has saved from having to rush home to Australia between contracts.

    Unless you get permanent residency, the only other option is the Working Holidaymaker which as Paul HDLover said, allows you to work for 12 months but only 3 months with one employer. If you stay longer than three months with the same employer but without sponsorship, they will deport you for violations of your visa conditions (I have seen people deported at my last employer over there).

    In terms of sponsorship, it's harder to get sponsorship than it is in the UK. There is a lot of paperwork that goes with sponsorship and alot of employers don't want to have to go through it. That is not to say there are not employers who wont sponsor you and there is where doing the three month stint might help you. You might also be able to find an umbrella company who will sponsor you if you they can see a steady flow of income from you.

    There is a benefit of the Working Holidaymaker and that is that it's cheap to obtain compared to permanent residency (a guy I worked with paid £1800 in application fees and solicitors to get his family over). You then have the option to try before you buy, find out if it's for you before looking at a longer term commitment.

    The great thing with Australia is the tax rule. While you will pay more tax, there are a lot more things you can claim back as tax deductions than you can here.


    My other tips

    - Do your sums - look at cost of living - domain.com.au will give you an idea of rents, woolworths.com.au will give you an idea of food prices etc
    - Look at sites like jobnet.com.au, careerone.com.au, mycareer.com.au, monster.com.au
    - Look at recruiters like Talent2, Paxus, Candle, Robert Walters, Michael Page Technology, Hudson, Greythorn (they are alot better than they are here), etc
    - Buy The Australian newspaper every Tuesday which has a 4 part IT section with jobs.
    - Take a quick trip between Sydney, Brisbane and Melbourne to see which one you like. These are where you will find more IT jobs than anywhere else in Australia with Sydney having the most but the Queensland government is trying to bring more IT into the state so there is another option.
    - If you haven't done so already, try and work in an investment bank or funds management company over here and do it for a couple of years (unless you are in a rush to emigrate). This will open quite a few doors for you as the UK market is the largest in the world.
    - Be prepared that you will earn less in Australia but the cost of living is a bit cheaper than in the UK. It's not like you will buy a house for 20p but my wife and I used to get 3 weeks of groceries for about £80.
    - Sydney: Unless you are expecting to earn £500 a day, forget about living at Bondi (where alot of expats live). Look at the inner west and the lower north shore
    - Degrees are not held in as high a regard as they are here. Aussie employers may still want to know that you have one but they are more interested in your experience.
     
  7. Adam_uk

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    A friend of mine transfered from our UK company to our Aus one.

    The company sorted out his accomidation, helped with visas etc. Took a while to sort out though.

    He is now based in Sydney and earns about $85 000, he loves it out there!

    Good luck
     
  8. dalboy

    dalboy
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    thansk itsamac. very informative.

    well its stll a premature idea.

    I might go to the expo exhibition in november and talk to some people there.

    if i would choose an option i guess it would be the 3 months at a time route. But still dont like the idea of having to find work every 3 months. I want to be employed on a consistent basis.

    Will research into it more

    Thanks again. :D
     
  9. jackal

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    In terms of finding work in the US, I think you you would find it very difficult TBH.

    When I moved over there and got my H1B working visa, my company had to a) advertise my post openly so that American citizens could apply
    b) Prove that my qualifications were uniquely suited to the job
    c) hire a lawyer to get the paperwork done

    It is a tough process. Getting transferred from a US based company with a division in the UK is far easier.

    I don't want to sound negative but there is a glut of qualified IT personnel in the US, and I do not think you would be able to get a working visa there unless you had some unique skills to offer.

    If you have your heart set on the US, then your best bet is to go over there on a tourist visa, seek out some companies whilst there and see if they would be willing to sponsor you through the whole process.
     
  10. Pat_C

    Pat_C
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    So you can no longer enter via Ellis Island, provided you don't have the clap? :)
     
  11. mrmc74

    mrmc74
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    With regard to Australia I would aim for the east coast. Adelaide is probably a good choice with quite a vibrant IT sector.
     

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