There is no political party I can vote for

Boo Radley75

Distinguished Member
With the stuff about protest votes, being talked about, it reminds me of the laugh I had about that where my missus comes from in Canada. It's basically the Texas of Canada, they had enough of the terrible Conservatives but instead of voting for some far right lot, they went for the NDP, as a protest vote, who are pretty much somewhere between Corbyn and the Greens. Then they all went apes**t because they got given free energy saving lightbulbs. :laugh::laugh:
 

richp007

Distinguished Member
Dunt certainly isn't everyone's cup of tea, but this is why we should tactically vote.

Why be foolish and leave it to chance :)

 

Heathens

Member
I think it's important to remember that people have many different reasons for voting the way they do, and none of them are 'wrong'. people will vote for a party because they agree with their policies, they'll vote for a party to remove a different party, they'll vote for a party as a protest against the system and various other reasons.

Personally, I used to vote Labour but find that I can no longer do so. Because of that I have decided to vote Green, not as a protest against Labour (although that's a side effect), but because I feel I can support them and their policies.
 

Nick74

Distinguished Member
Dunt certainly isn't everyone's cup of tea, but this is why we should tactically vote.

Why be foolish and leave it to chance :)



It's an argument I've been making for a long time.

I've seen nothing to alleviate my concern that we're being dragged toward authoritarian nationalism. Slowly but surely our rights are being diminished, while checks and balances on government power are undermined.

People will, I fear, wake up only once it's too late.

It's critically important to get rid of this government at the next general election. We have to drive the message home that the preservation of our democracy hinges on voting for the party most likely to beat the Tory in your constituency. The need really is that urgent.
 

Judge Mental

Well-known Member
Most people vote for the party rather than the local representative though.
Our voting system makes that necessary. We have a red wall Tory here who always votes with his party on every issue. If you write to him he regurgitates party HQ rhetoric. Absolutely pointless having a local representative like that.
 

Smudges Dad

Distinguished Member
Calling someone right wing and a brexiter is just as much a slur to stop debate
If someone claims to be right wing and a brexiter, why would they consider it a slur?
 

BorkenArrow

Member
Dunt certainly isn't everyone's cup of tea, but this is why we should tactically vote.

Why be foolish and leave it to chance :)


Could be worse....

FPLBmE4XsAYZXxa (1).jpg
 

BorkenArrow

Member
What year are you living in again? :)

If I didn't know better I'd say you were letting a squirrel loose ;)
Boris is nothing like Orban or Trump or anyone similar.

He may be inept, but he is not a right wing loon. All these attempts to paint him as something else are just farcical.

Blair on the other hand was a very dangerous man, because he actually knew what he was doing.

and I say that as someone that voted for him, many of the problems today can be put down to the policies he implemented.
 

richp007

Distinguished Member
Boris is nothing like Orban or Trump or anyone similar.

He may be inept, but he is not a right wing loon. All these attempts to paint him as something else are just farcical.

Blair on the other hand was a very dangerous man, because he actually knew what he was doing.

and I say that as someone that voted for him, many of the problems today can be put down to the policies he implemented.

Clearly you didn't read the article but hey ho.

As for your final paragraph, it's incredible that after 12 years of Tory governance it's still all someone else's fault :laugh:
 

Even Thorizon

Active Member
I've been eligible to vote for over fifty years, I've never been able to vote for a party that had a chance of winning and represented my ideas. There is however one party I have consistently loathed and I'll vote any way I have to to increase the chance of a party to the left of them gaining a seat.

In the meantime I have for a long time been a member of the Electoral Reform Society because I believe PR is our only hope for a fair and representative government for all.
 

morenish

Well-known Member
I've been eligible to vote for over fifty years, I've never been able to vote for a party that had a chance of winning and represented my ideas. There is however one party I have consistently loathed and I'll vote any way I have to to increase the chance of a party to the left of them gaining a seat.

In the meantime I have for a long time been a member of the Electoral Reform Society because I believe PR is our only hope for a fair and representative government for all.
I totally agree with you 👏

Without researching, where are we with PR ?

Regards.
 

Even Thorizon

Active Member
I totally agree with you 👏

Without researching, where are we with PR ?

Regards.

I’d say slowly gaining traction but the two larger parties are locked in a battle of mutual destruction. For Labour in particular it’s shear madness but they’re living in the past replaying faded glories whilst the people they are supposed to represent suffer.

 

Metromedia 1433

Well-known Member
It’s legitimate but safe seats are only safe seats because people vote for a particular party because they want their policies , if more people vote for another party then it’s no longer a safe seat
What I find galling is when commentators make statements like The Conservatives have lost the safe seat of Shropshire North. It can't possibly have been a safe seat to have been lost. :(

In reality there are seats that are comparatively promising for change, named marginal seats, and seats unlikely to change. No seat is certain not to change. I'll give another illustration. In 1983 Margaret Thatcher held Finchley and Michael Foot held Blaenau Gwent. By 2005 both seats were lost to Labour and an independent respectively.
 

Metromedia 1433

Well-known Member
Boris is nothing like Orban or Trump or anyone similar.

He may be inept, but he is not a right wing loon. All these attempts to paint him as something else are just farcical.

Blair on the other hand was a very dangerous man, because he actually knew what he was doing.

and I say that as someone that voted for him, many of the problems today can be put down to the policies he implemented.
In a way, it could be said that Blair lit the touchpaper leading to Brexit. For all his talk about never being complacent and steady building support, in practice he took the Labour heartlands for granted as having nowhere else to go, and merely reached out to floating voters, most notably soft Tory voters. Within 2 years many traditional Labour voters were disillusioned by the Labour government. Low voter turnouts followed. In 1999 the Conservatives had a back-door victory in the European elections. In 2001 Labour earned their 2nd landslide but with fewer votes than 1992 when they lost the General Election. There were several examples where Labour got fewer votes in safe seats than in marginal seats (eg more votes in Harrow than Liverpool seats). By the time UKIP became better known, disillusioned Labour voters felt there was someone new willing to listen to them for a change. So when the EU referendum came, such Labour ex-voters voted Leave, contributing significantly to the vote for Brexit.
 

Judge Mental

Well-known Member
In a way, it could be said that Blair lit the touchpaper leading to Brexit. For all his talk about never being complacent and steady building support, in practice he took the Labour heartlands for granted as having nowhere else to go, and merely reached out to floating voters, most notably soft Tory voters. Within 2 years many traditional Labour voters were disillusioned by the Labour government. Low voter turnouts followed. In 1999 the Conservatives had a back-door victory in the European elections. In 2001 Labour earned their 2nd landslide but with fewer votes than 1992 when they lost the General Election. There were several examples where Labour got fewer votes in safe seats than in marginal seats (eg more votes in Harrow than Liverpool seats). By the time UKIP became better known, disillusioned Labour voters felt there was someone new willing to listen to them for a change. So when the EU referendum came, such Labour ex-voters voted Leave, contributing significantly to the vote for Brexit.
Oh no you don’t. You are not laying brexit at the door of Blair or Labour. It’s a Tory shambles and they get to take 100% of the credit for it.
 

Derek S-H

Distinguished Member
Oh no you don’t. You are not laying brexit at the door of Blair or Labour. It’s a Tory shambles and they get to take 100% of the credit for it.
It is an interesting piece of political analysis that perhaps has a TINY smidgen of truth to it (disillusioned voters), but yes, Brexit as a fundamental concept lies with the Tories and Farage, nowhere else.
 

domtheone

Distinguished Member
Oh no you don’t. You are not laying brexit at the door of Blair or Labour. It’s a Tory shambles and they get to take 100% of the credit for it.
He's not laying Brexit at the door of Blair. He's simply saying that the seeds were sown, during the happenings of the Blair years and what happened during those times. That's undeniable.
 

Smudges Dad

Distinguished Member
It is an interesting piece of political analysis that perhaps has a TINY smidgen of truth to it (disillusioned voters), but yes, Brexit as a fundamental concept lies with the Tories and Farage, nowhere else.
And Putin, the puppet master behind Farage and Johnson
 

niceguy1966

Distinguished Member
Don’t agree with tactical voting or voting against something . Stick with your principles and who knows maybe if your principles are the same as others you can change things . Voting against some party for a party you don’t really want in power seems a strange logic
It depends if you want to make a real change to the country, or just do something totally pointless.
 

niceguy1966

Distinguished Member
He's not laying Brexit at the door of Blair. He's simply saying that the seeds were sown, during the happenings of the Blair years and what happened during those times. That's undeniable.
That's not true, I can deny it.
 

Smudges Dad

Distinguished Member
It depends if you want to make a real change to the country, or just do something totally pointless.
It also depends on whether you have moral standards.
 

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