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Question The Quest Fill The Screen

GBatman28

Novice Member
Hello all, I'm very sure this has been a topic that has been argued about on almost every Audio/Visual forums. The topic i want to discuss is Aspect Ratio, and the stretching of it through an external receiver. Is this possible? Is there even a will to make this possible?

I know there may be a few purists here who rather see Blu-Rays in their original ratio, but I am part of the group who just wants the movie to FIT THE SCREEN without distorting the image horizontally.

For a while now, I have owned an LG 120hz Trumotion, 16:9 flatscreen that still looks amazing when playing video games and watching Blu-Ray movies... Anamorphic Blu-Rays for that matter. As many of us already know, and are furious about, is the fact that most Blu-Rays are stuck in whatever Aspect Ratio they are presented in, and will most definitely fit horizontally, but will leave giant, disgusting, annoying, and ugly bars on the top and bottom of the screen. I have searched frantically for an option or setting somewhere in my Blu-ray player, my Television, and everywhere else for a way to stretch the picture Vertically, and NOT horizontally.

As far as my research can tell, Only HD projectors can stretch video vertically, but i am not going to go out and spend money reorganizing my entertainment center to fit a projector screen. Also there's the simple fact that the picture will pretty much mimic an HD DLP... IT WILL look terrible during the day with all the light coming into the living room. So going out and buying a Projector is completely out of the question.

What I (and thousands of other people) are looking for, is a Video Reciever that can stretch incoming video (Horizontally and Vertically Respectfully) , in order to fill your 16:9 screens with your favorite Blu-Ray movies.

Is this even possible? Why have i not found a device that can perform this? I know for a fact that there is a demand for this, so why is it not getting done?

If there is anyone who know of such device, please point it out to all of us.

Thanks Guys.
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
You can't scale up a letterboxed image without losing content off the edges of the screen, not in this dimension anyway and not without breaking several laws of physics! If you simply stretch the image vertically to fit the screen then it would distort the image and stretch what you are viewing. If you want the image to fill the screen as opposed to viewing it at its intended aspect ratio then you'll either distort the image you are viewing or lose parts of it off the left and right hand sides of the screen. You can do this if you insist by accessing your TV's picture settings. You can change the aspect ratio or zoom it within the Picture Size options within your TV's settings.

No, thousands of people are not looking for this because most people realise it isn't possible to do what you are asking without losing elements of the image or distorting the image. Besides this, you can do it by using the aspect ration picture size setting on your TV.

It's basically a matter of common sense really so maybe just sit down and think about why it isn't a desirable thing to do and why it isn't something people are opting to do rather than putting up with letterboxing.

You may also find this informative:


and this:
EKB: Aspect ratio comparison. Why the black bars?
 
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GBatman28

Novice Member
I understand completely, but this does not answer my question of why there isn't a video receiver that is able to stretch an image vertically and NOT HORIZONTALLY, just as an projector would.

If I remember correctly, there is an AVforum video about stretching a projected image onto a wide projection screen. In the video, the host uses an example of a 16:9 television and stretches the image vertically without distorting the image too terribly. Which is exactly what I'm looking for.

So you're telling me that there is not a video receiver that can do a digital stretch internally, and display it to your TV?

I have also found UnltraWide TV that fit the aspect ratios of most movies.
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
An AV receiver is primarilly concerned with audio processing and not video processing. You can do it via the TV's picture size settings if you insist on cropping or distorting the image. It wouldn't even ordinarilly be a desirable effect to include onboard a video processor, not unless you think it more important to completely fill your TV's screen with an image irrespective of the detrimental effect and distortion it has upon that image? If I sold you a TV who's image looked this way then you'd be demanding your money back.

Yes there are TV's with a 21:9 aspect ratio, but the vast majority of widescreen TV broadcasts are 16:9 so you'll therefore be left with black lines down the sides of all 16:9 TV content with a 21:9 TV set.

You cannot stretch anything in one direction without distorting it. You can scale the image up to fill the otherwise black areas, but the length and not just the width is scaled in proportion and the aspect ration is maintained. You lose the parts of the image on the sides if using a TV while doing this.
 
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GBatman28

Novice Member
But again, you are worried about MY perspective. It may be distorted to you, but it's a relief to me. Because I can watch my Blu-Ray star Wars movies without leaving so much of the screen completely dark.

And about the TV broadcasts, most stations convert their signals to Anamorphic aspect ratio to fill pretty much every screen. This is why channels like HBO will never have black bars on an Anamorphic movie. This is the kind of effect that me and a lot of other people are looking for.
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
No, it is distorted (stetched or cropped) irrespective of who is looking at it. As said, no one is stopping you from doing it if you want. Simply use your TV's picture size settings to scale the image so it fills the screen.

Nope All HD channels broadcast using a 16:9 aspect ratio. Even the HD broadcasts of films with a different aspect ratio that results in black bars are broadcast with the bars integral to the 16:9 image as a whole.

And again, you cannot stretch or scale anything without it either distorting that image or cropping it!
 
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GBatman28

Novice Member
OK if it's not possible, then why? How is it so hard for a device to digitally manipulate an image? Just as a projector with. A vertical stretch setting.

I don't want anything being thrown off the sides of my screen, I just want to stretch the image vertically to fill top and bottom.
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
It isn't possible to scale anything in one direction without it stretching the image in that direction. You'd end up with thin, tall and skinner looking people. The only way to avoid the stretching is to scale both the width and the height proportionally, but you then lose the sides of the image by doing this.

If you don't mind watching distorted images simply to get rid of black bars then you can do it via the picture size settings on your TV.
 

GBatman28

Novice Member
Alright, I guess I understand then. But why aren't most movies recorded in Anamorphic? Doesn't it make more sense to fit very screen?
 

simonlewis

Distinguished Member
Now i'm sure this thread is a wind up. :D
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
Maybe you need to actually look up what Anamorphic is? It is commonly used to film or archive content on film stock that is either cheaper to buy or easier to archive. What happens is that the film camera uses a lense to distort the image to fit the stock. The widescreen image is restored by projecting it through another lens that creates a perfectly proportioned widescreen image, effectively reversing the effect the film camera lense had. The original image is effectvely squashed and then restored to how it should be seen by the lens on the PJ. Anamorphic content would still result in the black bars depending upon the intended original aspect ratio.
 

GBatman28

Novice Member
What is. A wind up??? Steroid judging me because I used Star Wars as an example? I could have used any other movie that is stuck in its own aspect ratio.
 

GBatman28

Novice Member
Everywhere I look is just another too bad so sad response. There are people looking for this, and no will just go out and do it. Why can't a device do digitally, what a projector can do physically? Just stretch the image vertically without squeezing the image and creating black bars. How is it any different from free editing an image in a photo editor?
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
PJs are exactly the same and not at all sure why you think they can do what you think they can do? You are not squezing the image on its sides, the distortion is caused by your stretching it to fit the screen! You can't stretch it in just vertically while maintaining the existing width without it distorting/stretching and if you scale it proportionately both horizontally and vertically then you lose the parts that no longer fit on the screen!

If you stretch an image in Photoshop it is still distorted and stretched!
 
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GBatman28

Novice Member
But when stretching km Photoshop, you can stretch each side RESPECTIVELY, you don't have to stretch the whole picture. Just stretch vertically. I've done this a few times to fit a 16:9 image, and I see no major change or terrible distortion.
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
Yes and as I said, if you proportionately scale an image on your TV that already meets the left and right edges of that screen then some of the image will go beyond the screen so will no longer be visible to you. This is what will happen if you proportionally scale the letterboxed content to get rid of the letterboxing, you lose parts of the image on the left and on the right of the image.

ORIGINAL:
0g9B2F.jpg



SCALED PROPORTIONATELY:
Eqmp14.jpg
 
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GBatman28

Novice Member
You keep mentioning to scale the image,I just want to fill the screen vertically without stretching the screen horizontally. Why can't we do this?
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
Sorry, dgo sit yourself and think long and hard about it. You may eventually have a brain burp and realise how stupid you've been :)

This is more a matter of common sense rather than anything that needs an in-depth explanation.


How the hell can you scale just the height without it distorting the image?


Here's exactly what you are proposing

ORIGINAL:
0g9B2F.jpg


SCALED just VERTICALLY to get rid of the black bars:
4cTFLG.jpg
 
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GBatman28

Novice Member
You think this looks bad. I don't think so, so how can I be stupid for having my own opinion? I don't consider stretching to be distortion. I do however think that throwing image off the screen is distortion.
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
Well unfortunately for you, the actual definition for distortion would be more apt if applied to the disproportionate scaling. The vast majority would ordinarily accept that what you don't think is distortion as being distortion. If you like long thin tall stuff then good for you and good luck with your campaign to change the perceived realms of reality. :)

I guess Stretch Arnstrong was just another GI Joe to you?

It is generally suggested you do neither and simply watch stuff letterboxed. You then get to see everything without any distortion as the director intended :)
 
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GBatman28

Novice Member
Don't make me out to be some idiot on the internet. I'm just looking for answers because I can't find anyone who can explain this stuff clearly. I thank you for the explanation, but I do not appreciate your belittling attitude. Hopefully this helps anyone else looking for an answer to this question.

And I do think the stretched picture looks weird, but still, where is the middle ground? Stretch the image a bit without it detracting the image as much as the one you showedthere. Don't destroy the black bars completely, but just decrease them to a desired amount.

And my original question still stands, why is there not a device that can do this? I know it looks bad, but having this amount of control of the image is pretty cool. So why can't it be done?
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
As I said, you can do it if you want to. Your TV's picture size settings should allow you to apply settings that can both zoom proportionally or scale the image just vertically.
 

Jase

Distinguished Member
Perhaps a 21:9 TV and/or Projector/2:35:1 Screen/Anamorphic Lens combined with a Lumagen Video Processor is what you need?

 

True Romance

Distinguished Member
And my original question still stands, why is there not a device that can do this? I know it looks bad, but having this amount of control of the image is pretty cool. So why can't it be done?
Sir with the greatest respect your delusional.
 

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