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The negative effect of TV light on the eyes

RezaD

Novice Member
Hi all

Maybe my question is a little strange. Suppose the standard distance from a 55-inch TV is 2 meters, and the standard distance from a 65-inch TV is 2.5 meters.
If we follow the standard distance for each size, will the negative effect of both screens on our eyes be the same?
In other words, will the negative effect of light on a 65-inch TV from a distance of 2.5 meters be the same as the negative effect of light on a 55-inch TV at a distance of 2 meters?

Thanks
 

John7

Well-known Member
Why would there be any "negative" effect? Our eyes evolved to capture light and only light that is really intense, such as a laser or direct sunlight will cause any negative effects, such as sight loss.

TV sets do not emit anywhere near enough light intensity to damage the eyes.

Oh, and there is no "standard" distance for viewing a TV. If you want to see all the detail in a 4K picture for example, there is a point where the acuity of human vision becomes the limiting factor governing the maximum viewing distance.
 
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John7

Well-known Member
How can anyone answer? You haven’t disclosed what kind of ”negative effects” you are concerned about.

Do you really think TV sets would be allowed to be sold if they damaged people‘s eyesight?
 

sebna

Well-known Member
I sit in front of some sort of screen on average for probably 4-5h a day for the last 30 years and my eye sight has not deteriorated. Cannot say the same about my hearing for example...
 

RezaD

Novice Member
I sit in front of some sort of screen on average for probably 4-5h a day for the last 30 years and my eye sight has not deteriorated. Cannot say the same about my hearing for example...
How many inches is your TV?
How many meters are you from the TV?
 

RezaD

Novice Member
Do you really think TV sets would be allowed to be sold if they damaged people‘s eyesight?
Selling a product does not necessarily mean that it is perfect. Drugs are also sold in large quantities in the world


You haven’t disclosed what kind of ”negative effects” you are concerned about
the light
LED TVs have backlight. Please answer my initial post question according to this explanation
 

sebna

Well-known Member
How many inches is your TV?
How many meters are you from the TV?
I sit 1.8m from 65" C9 OLED.

I also work 8h+ a day in front of 3-5 computer screens.

And I spent considerable part of my childhood glued to computer screen.

With high nit HDR screens it is actually healthier for your eyes to sit closer to the screen so the screen bigger portion of your FOV so your eyes have a better chance to react to light correctly.
 

Khazul

Well-known Member
Maybe he referring to a common problem with some blue LEDs and display backlight LEDs having too much far blue and near UV energy in them. Apparently it can eventually cause retina damage and/or cataracts over the long term.
 

larkone

Distinguished Member
Thanks "John7"
One of my eyes is blind. That's why I asked this question.
If you have only one good eye and are concerned the sensible thing would be to remove the issue and stop watching TV.
 

Joe Fernand

Distinguished Member
AVForums Sponsor
Does anyone have an answer?’ - possibly your Optician or medical doctor can guide you on any issues you perceive around light level and light source.

Not a question for a group of hobbyists if you feel watching TV is going to be detrimental to your health.

Joe
 

EndlessWaves

Distinguished Member
Maybe he referring to a common problem with some blue LEDs and display backlight LEDs having too much far blue and near UV energy in them. Apparently it can eventually cause retina damage and/or cataracts over the long term.

A search didn't bring up much and it sounds like a facebook conspiracy theory, do you have any reputable sources for that?

OLED has no backlight. I mean LED

It's still emitting light to form a picture.

If whatever you're concerned about affects LCDs but not OLEDs is it something to do with polarisation?

As others have said it's unclear which aspect of light you're concerned about.
 

RezaD

Novice Member
As others have said it's unclear which aspect of light you're concerned about.
look, I know that watching TV under normal circumstances does not cause serious damage to the eyes.
I am concerned about two issues:

1- The distance from the TV
We are normally about 3 meters away from the TV. But experts suggest a much closer distance to watch the movies. For example, this suggested table is one of these sites (picture below). As you can see, about 1 meter is recommended for watching 4K movies on a 55-inch TV. Is the effect of TV light on our eyes at a distance of 1 meter the same as when we are sitting at a distance of 3 meters?

2- Having only one eye
My second question is, can one eye control the light of the TV well? Or does the TV light put more pressure on one eye (compared to two eyes)?
 

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RezaD

Novice Member
possibly your Optician or medical doctor can guide you on any issues you perceive around light level and light source.
Yes Joe, doctors can advise on light, but doctors have no technical knowledge of television. For this reason, I want to know the opinion of people who have technical information about television and use it along with the opinions of doctors.
 

JayCee

Distinguished Member
As others have suggested, talk to your optician.
No one here is medically qualified to answer you.
 

RezaD

Novice Member
As others have suggested, talk to your optician.
No one here is medically qualified to answer you.
My friend, my question is not medicine.
I will correct my question, I hope you understand better what I mean.

According to suggested table, the standard distance from a 55-inch TV is 0.98 meters and the standard distance from a 65-inch TV is 1.25 meters (for watching 4K movies). Now, if we follow the standard distance for each size, will the effect of both screens on our eyes be the same? In other words, will the effect of light on a 65-inch TV from a distance of 1.25 meters be the same as the effect of light on a 55-inch TV from a distance of 0.98 meters?

The reason for my question is that my budget is not enough to buy a 65-inch TV, but since one of my eyes is blind, I am worried that buying a 55-inch TV and sitting 0.98 meters away from it will be detrimental to my eye. (Compared to buying a 65-inch TV and sitting 1.25 meters away from it)

In fact, I want to know, given the limited budget and blindness of one of my eyes, is it better to buy a 55-inch TV and sit 0.98 meters away from it, or buy a 65-inch TV and sit 1.25 meters away from it? Or is it no different?
 

Dolus

Well-known Member
Wear sunglasses. 😎
 

EndlessWaves

Distinguished Member
It's just light, there's nothing special about it coming from a TV.

So it follows the normal inverse square law. If you're twice as far away it's 4 times less intense, if you're three times further away it's 9 times less intense and so on.

TVs are very dim though, compared to something shiny in sunlight. You're getting a higher intensity of light from wandering around a car show than watching TV.

Eye strain from TVs is generally as a result of other things, such as trying to focus on something a fixed distance away for a long period.
 

RezaD

Novice Member
So it follows the normal inverse square law. If you're twice as far away it's 4 times less intense, if you're three times further away it's 9 times less intense and so on.
Thanks "EndlessWaves"
Sorry I did not understand this part correctly.
Please explain more precisely.
 

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