1. Join Now

    AVForums.com uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

The need for RW/RAM when you have a HD?

Discussion in 'Blu-ray & DVD Players & Recorders' started by adf, Aug 24, 2004.

  1. adf

    adf
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    After spending some time here reading through alot of threads I finally decided to become a member.

    My question is whether you really need the "RW" / "RAM" capability if you have a HD on your recorder. To me it seems that you'd be doing all your recording and editing directly on the HD and if you what to take your recording with you some place else you simply use the "R" feature. Yes, I know that most (if not all) players have either or both "RW" / "RAM" but should choosing either one really matter when choosing a player?

    Im currently looking at the Panasonic-e85h and the Pioneer dvr-520 (the Toshiba 32 isnt available here in Sweden) and initially I spent alot of time reflecting on whether I should opt for RAM or -RW. Lately I've started to wonder if/when I would even use this feature. (RAM wont play in most other players and -RW have to be finalised, - does that mean that I cant re-write later on?)

    So please share your thoughts. How important is it really and in what scenario would you even use the RAM / RW feature instead of just R.

    Any inputs would be highly appriciated.

    -Adf
     
  2. Rasczak

    Rasczak
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2002
    Messages:
    21,151
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Argyll
    Ratings:
    +2,217
    Hi adf, welcome to the forums.

    Your entirely correct on this issue: the purpose of HDD/DVDR combos is to provide RAM functionality on the HDD (i.e. editting, timeslip etc) and then the ability to dub to DVD-R so your editted recordings play on other DVD players.

    There are, however, a few benefits to having re-writeable media:

    1) If you want to 'author' on a PC then you can use DVD-RAM/DVD-RW to transfer so you don't waste a DVD-R.

    2) Overflow storage should the HDD fillup - less likely on the 160GB/250GB models - but nevertheless you may have episodes of a series that you want to put on a single DVD-R so you could store the early episodes on DVD-RAM/DVD-RW until you have the complete set.

    3) Extra data security: to ensure your recordings are safe it is prudent not only to use different brands of media but to use different types of media. Hence you could keep a backup on DVD-RAM as well as several copies on DVD-R.

    4) Enable you to timeshift and watch on other DVD players. Obviously this is more a benefit of DVD-RW than DVD-RAM although the latter will play on most Panasonic and JVC DVD players now.

    Then your in the same position as 99% of other HDD/DVDR users: DVD-Rs are SO cheap now that they really are true throw away media. Why waste your time finalising or unfinalising DVD-RWs? If you intend to record loads of stuff to watch on a (e.g.) bedroom DVD player then it is worth going for DVD-RW otherwise it really is a total non-issue IMHO.
     
  3. liteswap

    liteswap
    Standard Member

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2004
    Messages:
    327
    Products Owned:
    1
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    East Sussex, UK
    Ratings:
    +1
    Yes, agree. I use:
    - DVD-Rs for keeping stuff permanently
    - DVD-RWs for temporary storage/transferring to PC
    - DVD-RAM not at all (even though my RD-XS32 supports them). I just can't see the use since the HDD never fills up as I transfer programmes I want to keep soon after recording them.
     
  4. phelings

    phelings
    Banned

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2003
    Messages:
    1,025
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Ratings:
    +0
    If you have a HDD then most of the time -RW and RAM will go unused.As RAM plays back on an insignificant number of players it really is of little use on a HDD unit.Whats the big deal about finalising -RW?It takes about a minute on Pioneer recorders,and it could be useful in the multi player household for watching on other players elswhere in the house.You can then unfinalise and reuse,although I am uncertain if unfinalising is an option on recorders other than Pioneer .Rasczak will know.But the whole question is pretty pointless,as you cannot buy a HDD/DVDR combo without either RAM or -RW,so you will get one or the other and whether you choose to use it is up to you.However,even though -R discs are pretty cheap,throwing them away on a regular basis seems daft.
     
  5. nwgarratt

    nwgarratt
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    May 5, 2002
    Messages:
    26,261
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Ratings:
    +2,821
    I don't use DVD-R's with my HS2. I do use RAM to transfer to my PC. I also use my PC's HDD for storage.
     
  6. bobbles

    bobbles
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    -RAM is useful if you want to clear the HDD to defrag it. I occassionally use -RAM if I am archiving and I miss an episode that will not be repeated for a while.

    I do disagree with this, the cost of -r very much depends on the quality of the media. What is the point in just throwing them away when you can quickily and easily finalise and unfinalise on -rw? another example of the throw away society we live in :(
     
  7. Rob20

    Rob20
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2004
    Messages:
    2,503
    Products Owned:
    1
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    103
    Ratings:
    +279
    I suppose it depends how you watch tv and whether other people want to be able to watch what you record. Having had the Pan 85 for a while now I use the HDD to initially record/edit films and tv series. Once I've watched the episode I'll either copy it to dvd -r disc, (as cheap as 30p or less), or just delete it off the HDD if I can't see myself watching it again. Once finalised they can obviously be played in most dvd players, including PS2's. The only time I use a ram disc is if my brother wants something recorded to play on his Pan 60 but doesn't want to keep it. Like football or something.

    If you're just making recordings for yourself the HDD and dvd-r is all you'll ever need.
     
  8. Rasczak

    Rasczak
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2002
    Messages:
    21,151
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Argyll
    Ratings:
    +2,217
    Yes agreed - but if you just want to lend a friend a recording you don't have to use the best quality media do you? I tend to have a spindle of dirt cheap DVD-Rs for exactly this purpose.

    Frankly I find it easier to lend a DVD-R - for one thing it has the best chance of playing back in a third party DVD player and secondly it saves having to ask someone for the disk back!

    If you watch alot of your recordings on an upstairs DVD player then yes it is worth having DVD-RW. If you don't though it's not really worth the hastle IMHO.
     
  9. adf

    adf
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    Thanks a lot for all answers! They've helped a lot.

    Thanks!

    Is this also possible with RAM? Can you pick the disc out of the "cabinet" or do you have to by a special player to your computer?
     
  10. Rasczak

    Rasczak
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2002
    Messages:
    21,151
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Argyll
    Ratings:
    +2,217
    Well I wouldn't have mentioned it if it wasn't ;) Most DVD-RAMs do not come in "cabinets"/caddies/cartridges but are bare disks which look just like any other DVD. You may need a new DVD-ROM drive as only drives from Hitachi, LG, Panasonic, Pioneer, Samsung and Toshiba (and a few other brands) read them. Consult the sticky thread "DVD-RAM (and DVD-RW VR Mode) To DVD-R" at the top of the forum.
     
  11. adf

    adf
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    Well, I supposed that they both would work, but as they say " better safe than sorry"... (I thought all RAM's came in caddies, now I know better) :)

    Now I know that RAM or -RW doesnt really matter to me which was the purpuse of this thread. Thanks once again for all inputs!
     
  12. phelings

    phelings
    Banned

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2003
    Messages:
    1,025
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Ratings:
    +0
    Knowing the history of many Panasonic users on this forum,I would be surprised if a Panny recorder would even work with a blank costing 30p.If Panasonic have any faults(other than 100% reliance on RAM)its their poor record when it comes to reliable recording with budget blanks
     
  13. Rasczak

    Rasczak
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2002
    Messages:
    21,151
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Argyll
    Ratings:
    +2,217
    I agree with that Phelings - Panasonic's can be a bit fussy - but perhaps if that makes people use good quality branded media there will be less tears in the future over data loss?
     
  14. Rob20

    Rob20
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2004
    Messages:
    2,503
    Products Owned:
    1
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    103
    Ratings:
    +279
    I own a Panasonic 85, my brother a Pan 60, and neither of us have had any problems use cheap Ritek blanks at 30p each. Must have used some 40/50 disks without any problems so far.
     
  15. Rasczak

    Rasczak
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2002
    Messages:
    21,151
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Argyll
    Ratings:
    +2,217
    Ritek is a good brand though - I think what Phelings was talking about was the myraid of dirt cheap Chinese unbranded disks you can get - some of which don't agree with the Panny.
     
  16. dude1971

    dude1971
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    Afternoon guys

    I've had problems with Mirrors, which I thought were good for a cheap brand. But I struck gold with some white label -r discs and they work fine for me. I'd buy the expensive TDK ones but they don't seem to be around much. When they appear on any mailings I get from websites they sell out very quickly if they are less than a quid a go.

    Regards

    Dude
     
  17. Rasczak

    Rasczak
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2002
    Messages:
    21,151
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Argyll
    Ratings:
    +2,217
    I thought the same once. Every Mirror disk I have burnt - from ones costing £7 each in the local Comet (early 2002) to cheapies brought online - has failed. A total, 100% failure :thumbsdow I will never use Mirror disks again.
     
  18. Dark Eyes

    Dark Eyes
    Standard Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2004
    Messages:
    124
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Ratings:
    +1
    This is why I use DVD-RAM disks to archive anything I want to keep that I think that I may never get the chance to record again (and will never be released on DVD).

    I feel it worth the extra money, for the greater chance of readability in the future - although nothing is guaranteed.
     
  19. bobbles

    bobbles
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    Does such a thing exist? Live programmes perhaps?
     
  20. charker

    charker
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2002
    Messages:
    396
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +20
    I have a Panasonic DMR-E30 and have burnt 100's of DVD's using "cheap" branded media. I have never stumped up for a DVD-R costing £3 just to get Pioneer, Verbatim or whatever stamped on it.

    Virtually 100% success with any Ritek G04 disk (tango orange, DataWrite yellow). Also the cheap DataWrite "reds" (V2 and V3) and the older (non Ritek) DataWrite yellows.

    Ritek Orange G04 at £6.50 for 25 or Ritek G04 printable work every time. Just bought some G05 (8x) disks for my computer and will try them when I get chance.

    Also found Panasonic branded DVD-RAM 4GB 3x, no caddy at CostCo for £18 for 10. DVD-RAM wipes the floor with DVD-RW of any description especially when used in an LG 4120B DVD-Burner in a PC.

    Cliff
     
  21. Rasczak

    Rasczak
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2002
    Messages:
    21,151
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Argyll
    Ratings:
    +2,217
    I tend to find one off dramas from the BBC can fall into this category. The BBC makes some amazing programming but only releases a tiny amount on DVD. Their one off dramas make an initial appearance and then disappear forever. Recent examples include the 'Private Life Of Samuel Pepys' and 'The Deputy'. Both are worthy of repeat watches but are unlikely to appear on satellite due to UK Gold/UK Drama only rarely showing such one-offs (especially if they are just an hour long, i.e. not movies).

    But it's not just the BBC - 'failed' ITV dramas such as the recent 'Making Waves' can disappear off the face of the Earth.
     

Share This Page

Loading...