The laws regarding taking photographs?

Discussion in 'Photography Forums' started by CarlukeDave, Dec 24, 2006.

  1. CarlukeDave

    CarlukeDave
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    Can anyone advise me of the laws regarding taking photo's of subjects that are on private property? Is it okay as long as the picture is taken from a public place?

    I'm planning to go and photograph an old hospital near my house, the land is still owned by the NHS and thy still have an operational admin building on the site, am I likely to get bother going onto the site?

    Do the laws differ in Scotland and England?

    Thanks

    Dave
     
  2. barongreenback

    barongreenback
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    Simple answer - why not call them first before getting into legal issues?
     
  3. Steve N

    Steve N
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    I can't see the difference between photo-ing a hospital or photo-ing churches, historical buildings, bridges, archititecture, ships, aircraft etc.
    It's not as if you want to go prowling around the grounds or through the wards.

    I would probably not ask though.
    If you do, and someone has to make a decision, they are more likely to have no idea and refuse to give permission just to play safe.

    I see another photographer on here has taken some school photo's and shown them on here.
    Nothing wrong with that, all quite innocent.
    But, as an ex school governor, I can almost guarantee, that if he had asked the school if he could put pictures of the schools children on an internet site, I am almost certain they would have refused.

    All part of the pendulum swinging to much the other way when it comes to political correctness.
     
  4. sivraj494

    sivraj494
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    Hi Steve, I believe you may be referring to my school shots. I see nothing wrong with putting the shots on the internet. They will be taken down soon anyway. Everybody at our school has to sign a consent form, so that photos of them can be used in various different ways.
     
  5. Steve N

    Steve N
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    I see nothing wrong either. Pretty good photo's too.

    I was just trying to make the point about asking permission is usually inviting refusal.

    My lad plays the trumpet and is in several bands, school and others. It is practically impossible get permission to photo him though due to the current climate of political correctness.
     
  6. redmax

    redmax
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    This is my understanding of the law concernng photography.
    1st thing to remember is that there are no specific statutes regarding photography so in effect there are NO laws in the UK against photography ......HOWEVER...........

    you will almost certainly find as a photographer you can be charged with a myriad of "offences" if the authorities choose e.g obstruction, trespass, invasion of privacy.

    You have the right to shoot people or property if it is in a public place.
    Ypou must sek the landowner/property owner's permission if you want to shoot on private property.

    There is however a grey area where you could shoot standing on ublic property and shooting into open private property but then you could be cahllenged regarding invasion of privacy e.g a garden party.
    It would however be considered acceptable to shoot a celebrity on a terrace of a resturant or hotel from a public place say a pavement or park.

    It would not however be acceptable to pint your camera into a bedroom from a public place say a pavement.

    Try this link for more info

    There is a free PDF to download.

    I always carry a laminated version with me when I am out and about.

    Hope this helps
     
  7. pjclark1

    pjclark1
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    I'm not sure that a NHS hospital could be considered private property.
    Seems like it is publicly owned to me, in which case, no problems taking photos.
     
  8. beachy

    beachy
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    sounds about right as hospital's are paid for by the tax payer.
     
  9. bodoman

    bodoman
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    oh good, so are the houses of parliament and we can `shoot`people in there then:eek:
     
  10. Zone

    Zone
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    :rotfl: :thumbsup:
    Not that I condone the use of violence ;)
     
  11. bob1

    bob1
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    I can't take any photos of my kids at shcool ,sports day ,christmas play etc , not a law just the schools policy,its been like that for years then this year there as been a photographer taking photos to sell to the parents,seems strange to me a stanger can have photos of my kids but i can't,:confused: .
     
  12. redmax

    redmax
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    I have had the same problems shooting my son playing football as previous posts I have made this year.
    I didn't back down though and it made me get informed about my rights as a parent and photographer.
    I contacted the FA and they confirmed that there is nothing to stop one taking pictures at football matches in spite of what some well meaning managers and referees say (they just haven't understood child protection guidelines)
    The same thing happens in schools. It is easier for a head teacher to ban photography rather than actually take the time to understand what the rules, gudelines and law actually mean.
    If I was you I would challenge the school policy and make themn introduce what happens at many sporting events or school events that involve children:
    My son swims for a swimming club. This is obvioulsy a place that could attract undesirable people wanting to shoot children in swimwear etc but the club has not banned pictures at all. It has chosen to take a balanced and responsabile approach.
    Anyone who wants to talke pictures must place their full name and address in the register before the event commences. You have to also state your relationship to the child in the event.

    Its the same at football tournements. You have to register and sometimes provide proof of identity and address.
    This way the genuine parents and photographers are not treated like perverts and the minority do not dictate to the majority.

    I feel very strongly about the erosion of parents rights in obtaining the treasured memories in pictures that will be the only recall to my kids growing up when I become an old man.
    The pictures are precious to me as I am sure they are to countless other parents around the world.

    mmm......I feel a campaign coming on..........:rolleyes:

    Bring back a sensible approach to photographing kids.

    :lesson::lesson:
     
  13. beachy

    beachy
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    what an excellent idea :D
     
  14. scotty38

    scotty38
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    Well said!!
     
  15. senu

    senu
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    Just a note about the NHS ( my employer!!:D )

    The buildings are public property and the grounds are similarly Public . I never get any strange looks when I appear with a DSLR

    However
    , patients have the right to some confidentiality and any image which breaches this is going to be frowned upon.
    Staff also have a right to refuse to be imaged in the course of work,.
    As someone who faces potential litigation at work on a daily basis I have a right to stop photography, Videography or voice recording of myself colleagues or junior staff under supervision while at work if I have a "bad feeling" about it

    However, a lot of my images ( which i cannot post interesting as they are) have been taken with permission and I'm actually free to use them as I wish but you never know when people might say consent was given without a thorough explanation so I remain guarded: Unfortunately the General Medical Council can be populist if it suits them

    It is the PC brigade and the press who use images to present stories with a certain slant that are responsible for the blanket refusal if permission is asked rather than any specific laws/ regulations
     

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