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The lasting legacy of COVID 19

everett_psycho

Distinguished Member
Awful as everything that is going on I've been thinking more and more about the lasting impact this virus could have on the world once it finally blows over and we can all go back to some sense of normality. With all the unprecedented steps being taken to try and stop it we are being forced to adopt technologies and ways of thinking that just haven't been commonplace until now. With the demographic we have on these boards I'd be interested to hear others input on what they think this thing will change in this world (for better or worse). As a starting point here's some of the thought's we've been having.

Will working from home become far more common? It's been possible for a while, but once companies are forced to engage mass working from home, if it goes well will we really ever return to the normal workplace? If it goes well and companies realize that staff can be productive and it reduces a companies expenditure will they want to go fully back to everyone under one roof?

Will fibre broadband rollouts be accelerated around the world? No doubt all of this working from home is putting a huge strain on old copper networks, Netflix are even reducing the quality of their streams to help them cope. Will this force governments to stand up and accelerate fibre to the property rollouts so if this ever happens again the world is more prepared for self isolation? I'll be interested to see how the likes of Singapore, New Zealand and other countries with widespread FTTP cope compared to those primarily relying on copper.

Will the travel industry ever bounce back? My partner works for a wholesaler in the industry along with some friends who work in the industry and we just can't see that the industry will ever bounce back from this to how it was. With a lot of companies already circling administrators this huge loss of income will forces those out of the game. There's also the question of the industry being stuck in the past, how many people truly go in to travel agencies for them to remain commonplace on the high street? I would imagine right now there will be a lot of branch closures and a smart business would likely centralize and consolidate it's workforce that remains with some key branches to remain. The industry is also layered with so many middle men and people are struggling to change bookings through their agents, will this finally mean people are more likely to go direct to the source for bookings from now on?
 

Rasczak

Distinguished Member
I think the main legacy of COVID19, as far as Britain is concerned, is vast public debt that we'll be paying off for the rest of our lives.
 
I'm with you on home working; companies will see it actually does work, the positive impact on traffic on the roads is already noticeable, and its also better for the environment.

Some of the consequences will be on commercial real estate, thus also on pensions, although the later in a perverted way may impact the pension funds less so in the short term due to their reduced liabilities.

I also agree with travel and international travel. I suspect that the cheap travel so many have been enjoying won't become available that soon again. The commercial AirBNB renters will also be out of business as I suspect due to liabilities but no income. After that event, that kind of business may flourish again.

And yes debt, debt, debt, perhaps a generation of savers will be born who don't like debt anymore. One can't but dream and be positive :)

Education will also see a huge change, and that area in the short term concerns me most actually.
 

Philly112

Distinguished Member
It will be interesting to see if we change or amend any cultural habits.
For instance, the rather disgusting practice of grabbing another persons naked body part, often a complete stranger, and indulging in some kind of frenzied attempt to either inflict physical damage on each other, or making sure that a full exchange of skin borne viruses or bacteria has occurred.
A weird and wonderful ritual that could be simply be replaced with a far safer nod of the head and 'Hello, nice to see you/meet you' or 'Hello, how are you?'
 

kbfern

Distinguished Member
Our whole way of life will have changed when this is finally over, and when this is done we better realise that some form of virus could easily happen again so better learn fast.
 

The Dreamer

Distinguished Member
It will be interesting to see if we change or amend any cultural habits.
For instance, the rather disgusting practice of grabbing another persons naked body part, often a complete stranger, and indulging in some kind of frenzied attempt to either inflict physical damage on each other, or making sure that a full exchange of skin borne viruses or bacteria has occurred.
A weird and wonderful ritual that could be simply be replaced with a far safer nod of the head and 'Hello, nice to see you/meet you' or 'Hello, how are you?'
Indeed, this is how I expect to be greeted by my crew from now on!
AE60DC69-5D73-4CDE-8EE0-491032261D0D.jpeg

;) :D
 

ashenfie

Well-known Member
We will hopefully see schoosl working from home with Skype (other brands available). We also know what really matters to households i.e. loo roll and paster.

Sadly it the last nail in the coffin for the high st, Amazon must be loving it.

It pushed the governments toward state own house and renting support. Maybe we will see a tumble in house prices. The housing market has been held up with government money and it likely that just is not going to be possible now with all the other things the government has to juggle.

And while BoJo is doing this, what's happening to the trade deals?
 

kBm

Distinguished Member
I would like to see a nation of people who are more prepared for any situation - i dont mean build bunkers in the garden for armageddon, but the war generation had the lasting legacy of always be prepared.

Example - Countries like America, Australia etc where power cuts are frequent, they have back up generators, spare fuel, food, supplies etc. What do we have? Spare pack of AA batteries?! Couple of tins of chopped tomatoes?!
 

The Dreamer

Distinguished Member
I would like to see a nation of people who are more prepared for any situation - i dont mean build bunkers in the garden for armageddon, but the war generation had the lasting legacy of always be prepared.

Example - Countries like America, Australia etc where power cuts are frequent, they have back up generators, spare fuel, food, supplies etc. What do we have? Spare pack of AA batteries?! Couple of tins of chopped tomatoes?!
Nope. Got our back up generator, spare fuel, veg plot, own water supply. We buy rice by the sack anyway, and my wife is busy cooking/freezing stews, chilli con carne etc. CCTV installed last week, and I’m not telling whether we have guns or not - but probably best not to randomly break through the perimeter!:lesson:







OK, maybe not the last bit - but the rest is true!:smashin:
 

everett_psycho

Distinguished Member
I would like to see a nation of people who are more prepared for any situation - i dont mean build bunkers in the garden for armageddon, but the war generation had the lasting legacy of always be prepared.

Example - Countries like America, Australia etc where power cuts are frequent, they have back up generators, spare fuel, food, supplies etc. What do we have? Spare pack of AA batteries?! Couple of tins of chopped tomatoes?!
And a years supply of bog roll 😂

It's interesting that a lot of people here in Christchurch have disaster plans due to the quakes a few years back. Bizarrely though they are stockpiling things like water for the virus as if it's going to get cut off like in a quakes. I work for the fibre company here and we are deemed an essential service so they have to have a full disaster plan, so all staff can be fully operational if it all goes wrong. I suppose in the UK there's not really disasters to the extent of earthquakes, tropical storms or tsunamis so the need is not as apparent.

At least it appears a lot of food and beverage companies are supporting the NHS and essential services, even in their hard times with hardly any customers this could go a long way. It would be great to see it continue afterwards.
 

kbfern

Distinguished Member
The thing that worries me most is continuation of utility supplies, electricity,gas,water,sewers,telecoms/internet, food supplies as without these things we would see a rapid deterioration of any reasonable existence.

Almost as important would be availability of medical supplies/services, banking services for access to paying for goods and services and withdrawal of our funds and savings.
 

Panavision

Well-known Member
We will go back to the way we were... eventually. I thought the world was going to end after 9/11, but it didn't in the long term, but in the short term it was very depressing.

The government will need to work on new ways to cope with future disasters, work with all countries, support each other in times of distress. I am not sure where we will start, though.
 

everett_psycho

Distinguished Member
We will go back to the way we were... eventually. I thought the world was going to end after 9/11, but it didn't in the long term, but in the short term it was very depressing.

The government will need to work on new ways to cope with future disasters, work with all countries, support each other in times of distress. I am not sure where we will start, though.
I think some things won't go back though. E3 could be a great example of this. It's been debated heavily if the games industry still needs the big show, now their hands been forced to axe it companies are looking to host their own online events, if those are just as effective for a fraction of the cost will they really want to spend big on E3 next year if/when it comes back? The technology we have that had never quite seen mass adoption is having to step in and once tried if it proves itself will companies just accept that and adopt it as standard practice?

It could turn out to be a very interesting fallout accelerating some technology adoption. Things like meetings, I was supposed to meet someone flying in next week, we are now just doing a video conference. It's one seat on one plane but scale it up so it's only necessary business travel taken and it has an impact on companies bottom lines and the earth. With flight shaming and companies now trying to be carbon neutral it's hard to resist the allure of these changes, if they can work in a crisis like this they will hold up fine outside of a crisis.
 

richp007

Distinguished Member
This sums it up pretty well for me.

"So society’s *real* key workers have been revealed.

Not the bankers. Not the traders. Not the elite hedge fund managers.

It’s the nurses. The doctors. The delivery drivers. The carers. The porters. The teachers. The shelf stackers. The check out staff."


The legacy of this had better be more respect for these people - from both government and the public - and the end of using the term "low skilled" to describe them.
 

CommonSense

Active Member
There is at least one good thing resulting from the Coronavirus which will make the Greens happy (though I don't know if it will be outweighed by negative effects) and that is the positive effect it is having on the carbon footprint and hence the environment. The need to cut down on travel in order to stop the spread will cause a decided reduction of CO2 emissions. I think also while industry goes into forced recession, less energy will be used.
Looking at the social aspects, the constraints being put on individuals require them to draw more on themselves, particularly mentally which will strengthen them now and later. Let's hope that during this period of regression into more individual efforts that people will better themselves either temporarily during the crisis or even permanently when it is over.
One practical tip for making wide kitchen rolls more manageable as toilet rolls is to cut them in half. You can do this with a serrated knife (fine teeth, used to cut tomatoes). Take long, slow strokes, pressing fairly hard rather than sawing. This will reduce ragged edges.
 
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JimmyMac

Distinguished Member
Could there be any positives amongst the doom? Very few but some perhaps

hygiene standards increased (people actually wash their hands and general infections reduce)

NHS gets the funding and support it always deserved as we realise we truly need it, forget HS2, stick the whole budget into the NHS

people reconnect with the normal world, communities have come together, supporting fellow people, perhaps it continues, connections made remain

families reconnect with kids, no more letting iPads and tv take care of the, parents spend quality time more

any more people can think of?

I’m by no means saying this offsets what will be a tough aftermath but perhaps just a few glimmers in the dark?
 

paulyoung666

Distinguished Member
It will be interesting to see if we change or amend any cultural habits.
For instance, the rather disgusting practice of grabbing another persons naked body part, often a complete stranger, and indulging in some kind of frenzied attempt to either inflict physical damage on each other, or making sure that a full exchange of skin borne viruses or bacteria has occurred.
A weird and wonderful ritual that could be simply be replaced with a far safer nod of the head and 'Hello, nice to see you/meet you' or 'Hello, how are you?'

I really do hope you are on about shaking hands ....
 

Hixs

Distinguished Member
I don't see this making any sort of lasting impact on joe public unless they know someone that has died from it. In the UK you're fudgeed due to the amount of morons that have carried on as usual. France is going to announce tighter measures soon and is set to extend the enforced home quarantine.

I haven't left the property in 2 weeks now...luckily have a decent amount of land, so not like I'm shacked up in a tiny flat or anything.
 

Greg Hook

Moderator & Reviewer
You only need to look at the complete idiots who went out in their droves to the coast at the weekend, those that crammed the pubs and clubs before they closed Friday night, those in McDonalds on Monday, those still out today who are being dispersed by the police and the panic buyers to know that nothing will change.

When this virus eventually buggers off we will go back to the same as before. The level of intelligence in the mass public is sadly not there to change anything.
 

Tempest

Distinguished Member
This sums it up pretty well for me.

"So society’s *real* key workers have been revealed.

Not the bankers. Not the traders. Not the elite hedge fund managers.

It’s the nurses. The doctors. The delivery drivers. The carers. The porters. The teachers. The shelf stackers. The check out staff."


The legacy of this had better be more respect for these people - from both government and the public - and the end of using the term "low skilled" to describe them.
Please don't forget all the tens/hundreds of thousands of factory workers that no one seems to be giving a toss about, also all the builders still constructing the luxury flats for the rich.

Really showing up 2 classes.

The white collar office staff that scuttle off home to work.
The blue collar poor sods who still have to go to work as normal or risk being sacked by the boss.
 

paulyoung666

Distinguished Member
You only need to look at the complete idiots who went out in their droves to the coast at the weekend, those that crammed the pubs and clubs before they closed Friday night, those in McDonalds on Monday, those still out today who are being dispersed by the police and the panic buyers to know that nothing will change.

When this virus eventually buggers off we will go back to the same as before. The level of intelligence in the mass public is sadly not there to change anything.

there's a possibility that natural selection will get the idiots ......
 

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