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The Home Cinema Experience

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by neveratt, May 19, 2002.

  1. neveratt

    neveratt
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    Well I've 'lurked' around the group for a while now - happily taking information. Following the advice from a projection company I installed a Sanyo PLV SU30, apparently brightness (Lumens) is everything - or so I was told. To cut a long story short I was very disappointed by the poor quality of the image and the vertical banding that the Sanyo displayed - on more than one model. I experienced the 'big day failure'. Family around at Christmas and the Sanyo failed to strike - a very low moment.

    To cut a long story short I took matters into my own hands and came accross this newsgroup in search of information.

    I am now a month into the ownership of Toshiba MT7 and what a difference. A few tweaks to the standard settings and suddenly the PJ is in the background and the movie is what's important. I guess like most members I'm revisiting my entire DVD collection. I do have two questions...

    1) Demonstration Clips
    I replayed Jurassic Park 3 last night, DTS and all. I thought this made a great demo of a home cinema - what else would be a great introduction for those who have not experienced Home Cinema before?

    2) Progressive Scan
    I feel I should understand this. Based on the theory that the only stupid question is the one that's never asked could somebody direct me to a useful (read simple to understand) explaination of what is required and why I should bother?

    Regards to all.

    Neil
     
  2. jrwood

    jrwood
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    Projectors are always improving, I can see them gradually replacing the large TV sets perhaps in the next 5 to 10 years. I've learnt a lot since I was introduced to budget front projection and Im still very happy with the little money I paid for the home cinema experience!.

    1) Demonstation clips I would use... for me it would be a) The 5th Element b) The Pledge c) Vertical Limit d) Gladiator e) Titanic - whats great is that all these films are very good and are worthy of anyones collection. Also watching films like Armourgeddon is a completely different experience on the large screen. I remember missing this at the cinema, I watched it on the TV and more recently it was shown again on TV but this time I played it on the home cinema projector at 114" !. It was like a different movie, the detail was phonemenal and engrossed you more into the 'experience'. I would'nt rate the movie compared to my favourites but it was one of those movies which was made for the big screen and was more enjoyable.

    2) read the following articles - you may need to copy/paste the long URL links. Also I think anyone will tell you that the detail you can see when you hook up a HTPC/HCPC to a front projector is phenomenal. Svideo is the worse input, then component and then the PC input with perfect pixel to pixel mapping. Imho all internal scalers in projectors are not perfect unless your paying a lot of money for the projector and even then its not as good as a HTPC/HCPC connection imho.

    http://www.whatvideotv.com/articles/general/200112_progscan.shtml

    http://www.progressivescan.co.uk/preface.shtml
    http://www.progressivescan.co.uk/

    or a summary of progressive scan

    'Televisions create images by scanning a beam of light across the phosphor coating on the face of the cathode ray tube. This is done in two sweeps which creates two fields, each lasting 1/50sec. These fields are interlaced to produce a single frame of 1/25sec duration. It's the slight difference between the fields that causes flicker, visible line structure and artefacts such as feathering (jagged edges) and shimmering horizontal lines.

    With progressive scanning each frame is produced by a single sweep lasting 1/25sec. This eliminates flicker and artefacts, and reduces line structure. The most common sources of progressively scanned images are selected DVD players, high-end TVs and camcorders. At present only NTSC-compatible DVD decks with component video connections can output progressively scanned material. Prog scan is not available from PAL discs because of an as-yet-unresolved licensing problem.

    You do not need a prog scan TV to watch prog scan DVD images, but you do need component video inputs or a non-interlaced display device such as an LCD projector or plasma screen. Prog scan TVs are not as effective as prog scan DVD players.
    Televisions create images by scanning a beam of light across the phosphor coating on the face of the cathode ray tube. This is done in two sweeps which creates two fields, each lasting 1/50sec. These fields are interlaced to produce a single frame of 1/25sec duration. It's the slight difference between the fields that causes flicker, visible line structure and artefacts such as feathering (jagged edges) and shimmering horizontal lines.

    With progressive scanning each frame is produced by a single sweep lasting 1/25sec. This eliminates flicker and artefacts, and reduces line structure. The most common sources of progressively scanned images are selected DVD players, high-end TVs and camcorders. At present only NTSC-compatible DVD decks with component video connections can output progressively scanned material. Prog scan is not available from PAL discs because of an as-yet-unresolved licensing problem.

    You do not need a prog scan TV to watch prog scan DVD images, but you do need component video inputs or a non-interlaced display device such as an LCD projector or plasma screen. Prog scan TVs are not as effective as prog scan DVD players.'
     
  3. dejongj

    dejongj
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    is not what you have used in your comparisons. The MT7 is in a totally different price band. For the cost involved I can recommend some other models you could have tried.

    I have tried and bought the Sanyo in a direct test next to the Panasonic, Sony and Toshiba (MT1 & 3). I found it an absolute winner.

    You have done the right thing, trust your own eyes.

    Cheers,

    Jean-Paul
     

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