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The future of Digital in the UK?

Discussion in 'Satellite TV, Sky TV & FreeSat' started by Biggles, Sep 8, 2005.

  1. Biggles

    Biggles
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    OK scroll forward in time 10 years.

    No analogue.

    Lets suppose I've got Sky, and 4 TV's, one each bedroom and one downstairs.

    I belive that I'd need two dishes as you can only connect two box's at the same time. I could use Freeview, but thats going to Sat so I'm still going to need the dish, OH and what about the cost! OK scrap that.

    I can go cable, can that handle downloading 4 channels at the same time, I don't know but I don't think so, and how will they price 4 connections? OK scrap that.

    What is the sensible way to connect all these TV's?

    What are peoples ideas?
     
  2. Nick_UK

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    Who says that Freeview is going to satellite ? I think you're getting confused ! :)
     
  3. Biggles

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    It was anounced yesterday that BBC and ITV were setting up a satalite company.

    Rumours suggest this is to cover gaps in the coverage and HDTV issue with "normal" freeview
     
  4. Nick_UK

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    Yes, this will run alongside Freeview - it's not intended to replace it. Freeview coverage could well be extended when terrestrial services cease.
     
  5. fortean

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    Sooner or later there will be a box that connects to a dish with a quad LNB. This box will generate the voltages and frequencies to switch each part of the LNB to cover the range needed. The 4 lower frequency feeds that the box gets from the LNB's can be amplified and fed to multiple outputs. The receiver will indicate to the box which polarity and frequency range it wants exactly like it does now for the LNB.

    Once the analogue channels are switched off there will be more on DTT and the coverage will get better because the relay stations will be converted to DTT.
     
  6. Biggles

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    OK so the option is one dish

    But you've still got to un the cables all over the house.

    Then you've got the cost, I'm guessing here but £35 SKY+, £10 per box multiroom, so £65 month!

    I've had Freeview in the past and it only works with a decent aerial so I suppose I have to wire them in.

    I'm just wondering how it's all going to work, I picked 4 TV's as an example what happens if you've got more (I wish I had the money, I've only got 2 at the mo)

    Could the whole signal from the dish be pulled into a box, that would allow as many tuners as needed to work? Would it be an idea to "network" the box and then connect the TV's to the network, allowing them to connect to multitude of different "feeds" e.g Web, Media center, Tuner box etc?
     
  7. Nick_UK

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    Well, that's true, but unless you were lucky to live in an area where you could use set-top aerials, you've always needed cables.

    The thinking behind the new free sat service is that you buy a receiver and dish over the counter, like with Freeview now. With multi-output LNB's, there's no reason why you couldn't cable 4 TV's (or maybe more). Note that Freeview boxes were £100'ish to start with, and now they're less than £30. No reason why simple satellite receivers couldn't cost the same.
     
  8. fortean

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    Another option that will become available is WiFi enabled TV's or adaptors. This will allow any number of TV's to receive a signal from a single point in the house. They will probably appear first to allow watching of broadband content on TV.
     
  9. Nick_UK

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    Wifi won't work in the average UK environment with its crowded housing environment. You'd be forever fighting with next door. There's already enough problems with video senders.
     
  10. fortean

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    WiFi will work perfectly well in a crowded environment if set up correctly. We have 5 WiFi AP units and 2 dual line 15 channel DECT base stations all sat next to each other at work. Oh and my DECT single line base station about 6 feet from the others. On each AP unit there are usually 4 or more clients all with excellent throughput.
    A WiFi type video sender would need some built in intelligence to avoid interference with neighbours though.
     
  11. Nick_UK

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    DECT phones don't come into it, because they use a completely different frequency (DECT is 1.8GHz - wifi is on 2.4GHZ).

    Wifi uses a small segment of the 2.4GHz band which is split into channels (13 in the UK). However the bandwith of one channel will only permit speeds of up to 54 Mbps. To get speeds higher than that would require more channels, and the risk of interference increases.

    Video senders, on the other hand, use almost the entire spectrum, but because the low power is spread across a much wider bandwidth (over 13 channels, if you look at it that way) the signal is spread much more thinly, so video senders don't usually wipe out wifi. It's impossible to send high-quality pictures (either via analogue or digital) on a single wifi channel.
     
  12. Biggles

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    I think wifi is probably the way it will go. Compression and new types will increase the bandwidth

    You'll have to settup security so that other people could'nt hack into your network.

    But then theres the question of pricing with companies like Sky.

    If they charge you per box / conection then you'll be tempted to use Freeview for some of your TV and that increases the chances you'll stop Sky.

    So would they be tempted to charge a "house" rate?
     
  13. Nick_UK

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    Compression inevitably resluts in a reduction in quality.
     

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