The Fugitive - tv series

John Henry

Active Member
Hi to all, I've just received the first release of this great tv series on dvd from the states and would like to know if there was a pilot episode for the series?

I've checked the relative site's for any information and they state it didn't.

Thanks for any help.
 

PoochJD

Distinguished Member
Hi,

Are you talking about the classic original show, starring David Janssen, or the 2000-01 remake?

The classic series did not have a Pilot Movie, but simply started with the first episode from Season 1, entitled: "Fear In A Desert City". A complete episode title list can be found here!

To date, only Season 1 has been released in a four-disc boxed set. Seasons 2 through 4 may be released at a later date, depending on sales figures.

If, though, you are talking about the remake, then we're getting into more intriguing territory. This TV series from 2000/01, (starring Tim Daly and Mykelti Williamson) is not as bad as everyone claims it is. Originally shown on E4, and partially airing on Channel 4 in a weird lunchtime slot, the show was reasonably entertaining, and Daly and Williamson made an interesting duo.

Now, the original Pilot Movie, known in the UK and US purely as "Pilot", runs around 90-minutes, give-or-take, and was shown in this format on UK TV in a two-hour slot. Also, this Pilot episode WAS given a UK DVD release, under the title of "The Fugitive: The Adventure Begins", courtesy of Warner Bros.

It can be found in some cheap discount stores, and in some branches of WH Smiths, for less than £3. The DVD is uncut, with a 12 certificate, in 16:9 anamorphic widescreen, and with a Dolby Digital 5.1 soundtrack in English. There are, however, no extras, of any kind.

Sadly, the rest of the show, was never given a release in the UK.

However, you should be aware that this same single-season US drama was also never officially released by Warners in the US either! If you've gone and bought this series from e-Bay or a similar site, I'm afraid you've been sold a bogus pirated version! :nono: You should therefore get in touch with the seller, and ask them what's going on, because they're conning you out of hard-earned money. :eek:


Pooch
 

Garrett

Moderator
Been a sort fan of both series but a big one of the 60's I think the 60's was shown pretty recently on daytime TV but only the first season and then the showed out of the blue when I missed it the very last 2 part where it all ended. The program relied more on characterization then the modem one and less on the action. If you put you 60's head on you'll find it one of the best of its kind and the reason it ran so long. I even have the sound track album of the series. They use the same basic plot later in the TV series The Incredible Hulk the one armed man became the cure, and Gerard became Jack McGee.

The later version was more on action and there was more to it than the one armed man I think there were some one behind the scenes. It finished on a cliff hanger.
 

John Henry

Active Member
Thanks for your reply's.

Yes it is the 60's series I'm talking about, why can't they just release the whole series at once, I hate it when they release tv series in seperate volumes, more money for them.

I remember when BBC 2 started to show the series again in the nineties, they never completed the run, we never even got to see the colour episodes.

Garrett, can I have the soundtrack please? :D:D

Love the music just like other tv series from the sixties.
 

krish

Distinguished Member
Now, the original Pilot Movie, known in the UK and US purely as "Pilot", runs around 90-minutes, give-or-take, and was shown in this format on UK TV in a two-hour slot. Also, this Pilot episode WAS given a UK DVD release, under the title of "The Fugitive: The Adventure Begins", courtesy of Warner Bros.
Do you mean "The Fugitive - The Chase Continues"?
- best online prices here: www.find-dvd.co.uk/D021031.htm
 

pRot3us

Distinguished Member
I loved the original series, and too noted its influence on later tv series such as The Incredible Hulk (as mentioned),also The Invaders and who can forget The Littlest Hobo :D . edit: I've just noticed the original Littlest Hobo started a year before The Fugitive in 1962 :eek:

I too never saw the final Fugitive episodes :(
 

Garrett

Moderator
Thanks for your reply's.

Yes it is the 60's series I'm talking about, why can't they just release the whole series at once, I hate it when they release tv series in seperate volumes, more money for them.

I remember when BBC 2 started to show the series again in the nineties, they never completed the run, we never even got to see the colour episodes.

Garrett, can I have the soundtrack please? :D:D

Love the music just like other tv series from the sixties.
Put the CD on and its boring as hell apart from the title music, it like 10 variations of the title, one jazz, one creepy etc.
I think the 60's was the best era for theme tunes.

I went and looked for the DVD and see theres only 15 episodes but what I did spot was they said the same about The Incredible Hulk and Quantum Leap was based on the same premiss.
 

Garrett

Moderator
Just though the concept was not new even in the 60 just look at the plot of Le Miserable its near enough the same basic plot line which I seen a few of, the best I seen are ones staring Robert Newton as the policeman and a later version made for TV with Richard Jordan as the pursued and Anthony Perkins as the policeman.
 

PoochJD

Distinguished Member
Hi Krish,

Do you mean "The Fugitive - The Chase Continues"?

Yep, that's the one. I knew the subtitle was something like "the adventure begins". :)

As for why companies tend to release shows on DVD in volumes, rather than in complete series/season boxed sets, it's purely down to money. Releasing a TV series is very, very expensive, in comparison to releasing a major Hollywood film.

With a film, the production company know well in advance if they are going to make a little or large return on releasing the film onto DVD, either via rental or retail, or both. They can use the box office takings in the various countries, as a good guideline, hence why some films get released in some parts of the world before others. (And probably why, to this day, so many movies come out in the US first, before the UK, irrespective of taking all the other stuff into account.)

With a TV show, the problems are multiplied:
- how popular the show was in various countries
- whether a show got a proper conclusion, or was curtailed by being cancelled
- how many episodes it contains, per series/season
- is there a new series/season being made, on which the distibution firm can use to increase sales
- the price of the show, that the distribution company charges, per episode or per series/season
- the recommended retail price, and how many units they will need to sell to break even, or make a profit
- syndication rights in the USA
- the genre: is it still popular or are there already too many similar shows out at the moment
- a distributor's schedule (have they got lots of other, more important titles to release first, or that take priority)
- seasonal fluctuations, like summer, Christmas, etc
- is it ultimately worth trying to produce a set for sale, and at what cost if it all goes wrong and sales are slow
- who owns the rights to the show, or if rights are available, how long will the distribution company let them have the rights for (e.g. one year, five years, permanently, or just one release of the series in its entireity)

As you can see, it's a hell of a big hassle to sort out the release of a TV show, which explains why some shows don't come out for years, whilst others come out almost instantaneously. Then, in some instances, DVD sales can reinvigorate a show, e.g. Family Guy, meaning that it made sense for Fox to start releasing all the episodes made, and get them on sale, as soon as possible after their US transmission.

Distributors can also have problems with shows being aired on TV in one country, but not in another. "Heroes" has already ended its first season in the US, and completed its initial run for the UK Sci-Fi Channel. But, Universal would be shooting themselves in the foot, if they released any or all of Season 1 on DVD in the UK, whilst the BBC2 transmissions are still going ahead. After all, a DVD sale is something that occurs once only. A customer buys the DVD, and Universal get X amount of cash for it. A TV transmission is something that the TV channel may want to repeat, or buy future seasons of, meaning more money (in the long term) for Universal, either through rights, purchase of repeat rights, rights for other channels (e.g. BBC3, BBC HD) and/or sales of other "minor" shows from Universal to the BBC, that may not have been as popular.

And sales of a US DVD set to UK or other countries, will be a miniscule percentage of the overall US sales takings, as a lot of people won't or can't be bothered to import, if they can get the same item in another two or three months from their local high-street store (albeit at ridiculously high prices, and with less special features). But to the average Joe and Jane Bloggs, in Dullsville, England, this won't matter, because they don't know or don't care. Only to more specialist collectors of films and shows, like those of us on the AV Forums, will the price and extras matter. We are the ones who will weigh-up whether or not to import a title, or whether to buy in our country. But the sales to us, are minimal, overall.

With all that in mind, companies tend to test the market, by releasing the movie or feature-length episodes of a show, to see if its popular. THey may risk releasing all of the first series/season, e.g Third Watch, TJ Hooker, etc, but sales may decline or not be sufficient to warrant releasing more. The problem, then, becomes that customers won't buy just an initial series/season, if they aren't certain they will be able to complete their collection, but distributors won't release future series/seasons, because sales of earlier series/seasons were poor, and weren't financially justifiable! :eek: All very convoluted, I know, but ultimately, it's a risk for everyone concerned.

This is why, bad films might get a quick DVD release, but the price then plummets to less than half the original price, because it's to do with shifting copies as quickly as possible, and making money from a sinking ship, whilst it's still possible to do so. After all, making a £1 per disc selling at £7-99 is better than making nothing from a disc selling for £12-99.


Pooch
 

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