Dismiss Notice
Attention AVForums app / Tapatalk users
Sadly GDPR means that, from 25th, we can no longer offer access to AVForums via the branded app or Tapatalk.
Click here for more information.

The eyes have it.

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by lovemunkey187, Jun 8, 2005.

  1. lovemunkey187

    lovemunkey187
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2004
    Messages:
    2,603
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    71
    Location:
    Notts/Sth. Yorks border
    Ratings:
    +29
    At the end of the month I'll be coming into a couple of K and was thinking how to spend it. And after giving it some thought I'm considering have my eyes lasered. I've worn glasses for the past 20 or so years(since I was about 9y/o). I tried contacts but couldn't get the hang of taking them out or putting them in so I've stuck with glasses.

    Anybody out there got experience either first hand or from relatives?
     
  2. Bev478

    Bev478
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2005
    Messages:
    140
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +8
    A couple of years ago my Aunt had it done on the NHS. Although we live in Plymouth, it was actually performed in Bristol. Basically, a coach was arranged & a load of people went up at the same time. Later seen as an outpatient at local (Derriford) hospital. Had one done first, then later had the other done - if I remember correctly. Had nothing but praise for the docs, nurses - & the end result. She was about 67 at the time & had no problems. Eyesight now very good indeed. Her husband (of 56+ years can't get away with quite so much now :rotfl: )
     
  3. Squiffy

    Squiffy
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2002
    Messages:
    11,869
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Ashford, Kent
    Ratings:
    +5,138
    OK, first of all my wife is an ex ophthalmic nurse who used to work on an NHS unit associated with a private clinic that did Lasik. (Her only involvement was in assisting with some of the pre-op and post-op vision checks).

    I had Lasik done in January 99 - both eyes at the same time.

    I had my procedure done at the Centre for Sight which is within the Queen Victoria Hospital (QVH) in East Grinstead.

    The fact that my wife was happy for me to have the surgery should speak volumes about her confidence as a professional in the Lasik procedure and in the people performing it.

    The Centre for Sight (see http://www.centreforsight.com ) run regular seminars where you get a presentation from the consultant, watch a video of an actual operation and then get the chance to question the consultant and previous patients (like myself). I'd recommend the free seminar to anyone as the best way to learn more and to get your concerns addressed.

    One thing that my wife says is that the consultant (Mr Shiraz Daya) is probably the leading corneal consultant in Europe. She doesn't work there any more, so I don't think she's just sucking up to him. :)

    There are lots of places offering Lasik & PRK now. Personally I wouldn't touch PRK, but thats just my opinion as formed by my wifes feedback, and the poor experience of a friend who had it done.

    When choosing a clinic to perform your surgery you need to look at the whole package of what is offered. Does it include after care? What if your eyes regress, do you get treated again (I did - more on that later). A cheap up-front cost does not always mean the best value. Another advantage of the Centre for Sight is that they are based within an NHS hospital, and therefore have to keep clinical records and be subject to NHS audits & the like.

    So how was my experience?

    The operation itself.

    If you wear hard contacts, you have to stop wearing them for about a month to allow the cornea to revert to its natural shape. For soft contacts its about two weeks.

    On the operation day your eyes are fully checked out and your vision measured prior to the operation. You are given a Valium to keep you relaxed, and then go into the operation room. I didn't feel any different after the valium, although I was a little unsteady on my feet so it obviously worked. You also get a lot of anaesthetic drops at regular intervals to numb your eye. The op is done under local only!

    You walk into the room, lie on the couch and are prepared. A surgical sheet is placed over your face, with a hole cut out for your eye. Some callipers are used to hold your eye open. This doesn't hurt, but you can feel 'pressure'.

    A flap is then cut into your eye. The squeamish should skip this but! A suction ring is placed onto your eye to hold it and stop you moving. A side effect of the ring is that it raises pressure in your eye and everything goes dim. The ring itself is a mount for the cutter, which reminds me of a cigar cutter. This moves across the eye cutting a flap, and leaving the flap attached at one end. The cutter and suction ring are removed, and your vision then returns.

    (Side point - PRK differs in that rather than cutting a flap, the top surface of your eye is scratched off. Not only is this painful afterwards, but the tissue growing back can scar which leads to problems with haze at night).

    The flap is then peeled back. This is odd. You can see a red dot above your eye, but as the flap is peeled back everything goes very 'watery', and the red dot becomes a red cloud.

    You are then told to keep your eye fixed on the red dot and to not move while the treatment takes place. You are aware of a red dot flashing very quickly over your eye, a clicking noise and a vaguely unpleasant funny smell. Yes, it's the smell of bits of your cornea being vaporised!

    The laser has a scanner to track any movements of your eye so don't get too paranoid about staying absolutely still. Just stay relaxed.

    The laser lasts for 15 seconds or so. When it is finished your eye is washed, and the flap replaced. There are no stitches.

    They take the surgical mask off and you sit up. There is a clock at the foot of the bed-thing, and I was surprised and delighted to be able to read the time immediately. (With my second eye it was a little watery on sitting up).

    You then have an eye shield fitted. This is a just a clear perspex dome, which is secured to your face with surgical tape. You are taken back to the waiting room, and after 30 minutes or so you then have a check up. Assuming this is OK and you are happy to proceed, you then do the same again with the second eye.

    For the first 24 hours they recommend you don't move your eyes too much. I'd recommend an evening appointment to be honest, so you can go to bed afterwards. (You get a sleeping pill if you want one). For six weeks afterwards you have to wear the eye shields when going to bed, but this really isn't uncomfortable despite people thinking they couldn't sleep with them. Believe me, it isn't that bad - although they do make you look like "The Fly".

    How quickly do you recover? The day after I was done, I drove my wife and I to the cinema. It really is that quick.

    Does it hurt? Not at all.

    What is the success rate? I can't speak for other Lasik clinics, but the Centre for Sight have an excellent record. Typical results are that 10% of patients can have their sight regress by 10% of their original vision. This happened to me. I can't speak for the success rates of other clinics, but I was the only person in the whole of 1999 who regressed to the point of needing to be re-treated. Why me?!? :(

    For the first couple of weeks my vision was better than 20-20 - and better than I had ever achieved with glasses or contacts. But I regressed. I was originally -7.50, and my vision regressed to about -0.75. This was borderline for passing the driving test, so I was re-treated three months after my first operation. Yes they can re-lift the flap without re-cutting it, but other than that the operation is the same.

    The re-treatment went well. The only complication being that within 30 mins of my second retreatment I did have some pain in one eye. I was given some drops to take. Within 20 minutes of taking the first drop the pain went away.

    There is a common belief that the flap is vulnerable. Nonsense. My wife only ever saw one patient with a flap problem, and this was a guy who was poked in the eye by his daughter a couple of weeks after his operation. I'd expect a person without a flap to have a corneal abrasion or worse after an incident like that! You do have to take care - e.g. not swim for six months or so, as the flap is a theoretical route for infection but my wife hasn't been aware of anyone ever getting anything. After about a year or so, I think the flap is almost completely healed.

    (Side point - about 8 weeks after I was done I became aware that my vision wasn't as good as it should be. I went to a local optician that day to check I was safe to drive, and the optician could barely even see the flap - and that was only after I told her it was there!)

    At the time I was done, the cost was about £1500 per eye. This covers the operation, all drops, all after-care appoinmtments and any re-treatments you might need.

    Since my re-treatment I've been fine. My vision is now left eye slightly better than 20-20 and right eye slightly worse. I'm delighted with the result, and would have no hesitation with recommending Lasik in general, and the Centre for Sight in particular.

    UPDATE

    The above is a report I wrote back in 2002 on my Lasik experience.

    Since then I'm still not wearing glasses. However my sight overall has deteriorated slightly, but this is due to normal aging and my diabetes and is not due to any problems caused by the operation.

    If you have any questions at all, just ask. :)
     
  4. Bev478

    Bev478
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2005
    Messages:
    140
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +8
    Gulp - slightly more useful than my anecdote :blush: :eek: :D
     
  5. eviljohn2

    eviljohn2
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2002
    Messages:
    7,545
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    86
    Location:
    Near London.
    Ratings:
    +208
    TBH, the whole idea scares the life out of me and I've been wearing glasses since I was 7. Even though it's a bit old now that was an excellent and interesting account of your experience Squiffy. Thanks. :)
     
  6. lovemunkey187

    lovemunkey187
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2004
    Messages:
    2,603
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    71
    Location:
    Notts/Sth. Yorks border
    Ratings:
    +29
    Thanks for the feed back guys and gals, going to have to find out if my eyes ARE THE RIGHT SORT FOR THE operation.
     
  7. Tejstar

    Tejstar
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2002
    Messages:
    22,813
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    136
    Location:
    London
    Ratings:
    +1,082
    I’m much like you eviljohn, I’ve wore glasses since about 12 and have very poor eyesight. I have dabbled with the idea of laser surgery but neither me or my wife have too much confidence. Despite your glowing appraisal squiffy the operation just scares me!
     
  8. themoid

    themoid
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2001
    Messages:
    879
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    31
    Location:
    Staffs
    Ratings:
    +30
    same here, worn glasses since I was 9, just don't like the thought of messing with my eyes just in case.....
     
  9. Achy

    Achy
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2002
    Messages:
    297
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Ratings:
    +30
    Like everyone else, I've been thinking about Laser treatment on my eyes.

    I look into it every year or so, but the thing that always puts me off is that every time I research it there's a new method !

    The new method always says how much better it is than before and how the method it replaces wasn't much good ! :eek:

    For example...

    PRK replaced by LASIK replaced by IntraLASIK

    Now I know that techniques change and advances are made all the time, so I suppose it's just a question of when do I decide !

    I think the other thing that puts me off is the long term effects.... it's still a relatively (25 years?) new procedure so could there be any long term effects ? Will my eyes explode when I'm 80 :eek: :confused:
     
  10. kelvin

    kelvin
    Member

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2002
    Messages:
    1,598
    Products Owned:
    1
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    51
    Location:
    Down South... (Bournemouth)
    Ratings:
    +45
    Having read that, the thing that would put me off is the fact that it's only done under a local :eek: I'm not normally squeamish but geez... :eek:

    K.
     
  11. Squiffy

    Squiffy
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2002
    Messages:
    11,869
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Ashford, Kent
    Ratings:
    +5,138
    25 years is a very long time in medical science though. If there were any long-term adverse effects from the operation, we would have seen them by now.

    I know what you mean about techniques changing. But it's just a matter of balancing what you want out of it. LASIK which I had does have some limitations which IntraLASIK can get round. But LASIK was suitable for me at the time, and as a result I've had six years without glasses.

    If people put it off every year, then they're just going to put off when they get the benefit of the treatment.

    Oh, and I can assure everyone that prior to the operation I had exactly the same fears about it being under local, fear of the pain, fear it would go wrong, etc. I really would suggest that people go out and find out more about it. It is nowhere near as bad as people think. I know several people who have had it done, and my wife came across hundreds in her job. I don't know anyone who regrets getting it done at all.
     
  12. smelly

    smelly
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2004
    Messages:
    1,601
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    66
    Location:
    Bristol
    Ratings:
    +102
    My husband had Lasik done 4 yrs ago and touch wood has had no problems. His was done for medical reasons as well as cosmetic. He was very short sighted (about -9 and -10). His glasses were like bottle tops and so he'd worn hard lenses since a very early age. When he was told that he would no longer be able to wear lenses as they were damaging his eyes there was no way he was going back to glasses so he called the clinic the same day!! He was lucky in that although he was very shortsighted and needed a lot of laser time (about a minute rather than the 15 secs Squiffy described!!) he's got thick lenses/corneas :confused: whichever - sorry not too up on the technical side of things :D Its this thickness that determines whether you're suitable more than how short sighted you are. Is this right Squiffy?

    Anyway - he would recommend it to anyone - doesn't wear glasses at all now although he's not quite 20/20 vision. He had no pain throughout the op, discomfort afterwards but said it was worth it.

    I however was foolish enough to watch it being done :eek: It was exactly as Squiffy describes and no matter how much he tells me it doesn't hurt its put me off....I'm still with my contacts.. :rolleyes:
     
  13. Synchronicity

    Synchronicity
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2003
    Messages:
    2,817
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    86
    Ratings:
    +213
    I had it done back in January,and have to say its one of the best things Ive done :cool:

    Id worn glasses for as long as I can remember and was previously told that my vision was to bad to have the laser surgery.Apparently the technology has advanced considerably over the last few years and after going for a consoltation a few months ago,I was told they could do it no problem although they did say that because I was borderline my sight MAY not be 20/20 after the surgery but will definatley be a big improvement.....

    Well,obviously I decided to bite the bullet and go for it,travelled up to Harley street and let them loose on my eyeballs.The surgey itself only lasted about 15 minutes altogether then it was off to the pub for a few more ales,although I had to wear shades as bright lights were very uncomfortable.

    6 months later and everything is fine,no sudden blindness and my eyesight is spot on.Id definatley reccomend it to anyone.Only bad points are obviously the cost,(but over the years how much do you spend on glasses anyway?)and the whole eyeball sucking part :eek: but worth it in the end :cool:
     
  14. Member 55145

    Member 55145
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2005
    Messages:
    12,079
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Ratings:
    +3,479
    very good post squiffy, im sure you'll help alot of people worried about this.

    you have to ask yourself how important your eyes are to yourself, and being on a website like this I think youd consider your eyes as your upmost priority, you get what you pay for in this world, so no expense spared if ever I had to have an operation on my eyes.

    my brothers boss had his eyes done and they messed em up big time, so just be weary of who you go for, do your reasearch and good luck
     
  15. Nobber22

    Nobber22
    Member

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2002
    Messages:
    2,982
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    86
    Location:
    Berkshire
    Ratings:
    +111
    Geez Smelly: you married a mole! :D

    My wife is -6 and can't see much more than shapes or tell the difference between light and dark without her contacts. :rolleyes:

    P.S. NO, we didn't meet when her lenses were in the shop getting replaced!! :mad:
     
  16. Squiffy

    Squiffy
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2002
    Messages:
    11,869
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Ashford, Kent
    Ratings:
    +5,138
    Yes. Although obviously it is a combination. Someone with a thin cornea, but only a low level of short sightedness requires less re-shaping of their cornea, and therefore might still be suitable.

    When light enters your eye, it is focussed by two elements. First of all there is the cornea itself. This provides about 1/3 of the overall focussing power. Then there is the lense inside the eye which provides the rest.

    If you are short-sighted, then your eye is focusing the light entering your eye before it hits the retina at the back of your eye. So to reduce the level of focusing, you need to 'flatten' the cornea.

    See http://www.centreforsight.com/lasik/short.php

    This basically involves using the laser to vapourise corneal cells and create an overall flatter shape. Your destroy more cells in the centre, and less towards the edges.

    So there can be problems treating people where their cornea is thin, flat, too steeply curved, with an irregular surface, etc.

    IntraLASIK has improved that an awful lot though, so many previously unsuitable patients can now be treated.

    There is also a new treatment on the horizon called INTACS which involves cutting a flap as per LASIK, but instead of reshaping the cornea with a laser, a 'permanent' contact lense is fitted instead. This looks to be a good option for many more people who don't have a cornea suitable for laser treatment.
     
  17. loonatic

    loonatic
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2003
    Messages:
    1,925
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    41
    Location:
    Springwell Village, Gateshead
    Ratings:
    +16
    Hi Squiffy,

    I had been under the impression that people with diabetes were not suitable for any form of laser eye treatment but this is clearly not true...did you have to take any extra precautions or seek any extra advice before going ahead ?

    Cheers, Lee
     
  18. smelly

    smelly
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2004
    Messages:
    1,601
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    66
    Location:
    Bristol
    Ratings:
    +102
    Look at the avatar - my choice was limited ;)
    I wasn't aware of this - my hubby wasn't diagnosed diabetic when he had his done but has been diagnosed since. He hasn't suffered any effects as far as I know :confused:
     
  19. Squiffy

    Squiffy
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2002
    Messages:
    11,869
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Ashford, Kent
    Ratings:
    +5,138
    I had my LASIK treatment in 1999. I was diagnosed with diabetes in 2002....
     
  20. loonatic

    loonatic
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2003
    Messages:
    1,925
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    41
    Location:
    Springwell Village, Gateshead
    Ratings:
    +16
    Ah...so am I still correct in thinking that diabetes and laser treatment don't mix ? have been diabetic for the last 14 years myself.

    Cheers, Lee
     
  21. Squiffy

    Squiffy
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2002
    Messages:
    11,869
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Ashford, Kent
    Ratings:
    +5,138
    Diabetes is a contra-indication of suitability, but not always a conclusive one.

    A well controlled diabetic might be suitable - it is down to individual practices and their assessment of your individual circumstances whether they would consider you as a candidate.
     
  22. Astaroth

    Astaroth
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2004
    Messages:
    3,653
    Products Owned:
    2
    Products Wanted:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    133
    Location:
    London
    Ratings:
    +882
    She who must be obeyed had laser surgery on her eyes several years ago - all went ok but her eye sight wasnt perfect esp when reading close up.

    She went back again and they re did both eyes but effectively did one with a bias towards long sight and the other with a bias to close up. She said it took a little time to get used to it (and she doesnt have 20-20 vision given the bias) but hasnt looked back (no pun intended) since she had the second op 3-4 years ago. The other option she was given was to have both eyes 'set' for long distance but then have to wear reading glasses but she felt this defeated the object of the proceedure.
     
  23. Achy

    Achy
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2002
    Messages:
    297
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Ratings:
    +30
    Do you know what happened ? And which company !?
     

Share This Page

Loading...
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice