The Cycling Thread

jouster

Moderator

Johnmcl7

Distinguished Member
I had a ride two or three years ago where the snow had melted a bit, frozen then snowed a bit more on top which even for the fat bike made for tricky conditions. We ended up doing about 5 miles in three and a half hours having to walk a lot of the uphill then sliding down some of the lethal downhill on my rear end dragging the bike behind me. It's hard to explain to people why that can still be a lot of fun but it was a good night.

I had a go at a TT race in Zwift for the first time which is quite a cool set up but not sure I'd try it again as it really killed me, I know it's supposed to do that but felt pretty rough afterwards . I quite fancy trying a normal race but I'm not really sure where to start since there's a lot to choose from and many of them seem to take it very seriously. In particular power categories seem a real bone of contention with many warning about disqualifications, I don't really know what power level I'd be. In the TT race I finished at 3.5w/kg but there's no way I could sustain that pace for any longer.

I'm getting better at staying on the rollers for longer now since I can drink without getting off and I can briefly stand on the pedals to give my rear a break but the main problem is dealing with the sweat. I've tried using a towel while riding but it seems to muck up my balance although I may be better now, I was looking at head bands but wondering if they could feel a bit suffocating. I was also looking at arm bands so I could easily give my head a quick wipe but I'm wondering how others manage this,
 

reiteration

Distinguished Member
back in the early 90s I did a sunday ride in the snow (wasn't snowing them, but a decent few inches on the ground), and was living in Newcastle, and went down Derwent walk...I was on my trusty trek 950 (and most likely my porcupine 2.1 tyres..), and I saw a c2c(?) route that went across the walk, so I thought I'd try it...

I had just bought some cheap brake pads from halfords too - and rode through some fields... then at some point came to a road and rode down there...it was fairly steep and a T-junction at the bottom...I went to slow down and that wasn't happening... :( cheap brakepads.. :( the only way I could stop was by crashing into a hedgerow as pressing the brakes didn't even make a difference :(
 

StefanBFC

Well-known Member
Awesome pictures. Very jealous.

I was hoping for more snow this weekend just so we could get out in it again. Its been absolutely non-stop rain, it will definitely be a different outcome this weekend.
Hosepipe ready!!
 

KyleS1

Distinguished Member
I had a ride two or three years ago where the snow had melted a bit, frozen then snowed a bit more on top which even for the fat bike made for tricky conditions. We ended up doing about 5 miles in three and a half hours having to walk a lot of the uphill then sliding down some of the lethal downhill on my rear end dragging the bike behind me. It's hard to explain to people why that can still be a lot of fun but it was a good night.

I had a go at a TT race in Zwift for the first time which is quite a cool set up but not sure I'd try it again as it really killed me, I know it's supposed to do that but felt pretty rough afterwards . I quite fancy trying a normal race but I'm not really sure where to start since there's a lot to choose from and many of them seem to take it very seriously. In particular power categories seem a real bone of contention with many warning about disqualifications, I don't really know what power level I'd be. In the TT race I finished at 3.5w/kg but there's no way I could sustain that pace for any longer.

I'm getting better at staying on the rollers for longer now since I can drink without getting off and I can briefly stand on the pedals to give my rear a break but the main problem is dealing with the sweat. I've tried using a towel while riding but it seems to muck up my balance although I may be better now, I was looking at head bands but wondering if they could feel a bit suffocating. I was also looking at arm bands so I could easily give my head a quick wipe but I'm wondering how others manage this,
Create an account on zwift power and link it to your zwift account. That will tell you what category you are based on your group rides and races. 3.5w/kg is cat b. That is pretty hard core.
Once you know your cat, just enter any event at that cat and have fun.

I use a sweat guard (attaches between stem and seat post), have a turbo towel over the bars, you really need something on the bars as your sweat will corrode them otherwise, then in the summer I use a thin sweatband - more lycra material than toweling and works really well without making you super hot. Are you using a fan?
 

Johnmcl7

Distinguished Member
The 3.5w/kg is pretty misleading since I'm fairly light at ~60kg and it was a flat 11 mile race. Normally with road riding I pace myself for endurance so I'm not great at pacing myself on intense rides, I don't know if it's better to start at Cat D and possibly go over that or start at cat B or C and drop down if I'm not good enough.

I've not been dripping sweat because before I reach that stage I have to stop and wipe the sweat from getting in my eyes. I've seen the thinner lycra type headbands so I'll give one of them a go. I'm not using a fan because I'm setting it up in the kitchen where there's a lot of loose stuff about and it's fairly manageable at the moment although that may well change in summer.
 

KyleS1

Distinguished Member
The 3.5w/kg is pretty misleading since I'm fairly light at ~60kg and it was a flat 11 mile race. Normally with road riding I pace myself for endurance so I'm not great at pacing myself on intense rides, I don't know if it's better to start at Cat D and possibly go over that or start at cat B or C and drop down if I'm not good enough.

I've not been dripping sweat because before I reach that stage I have to stop and wipe the sweat from getting in my eyes. I've seen the thinner lycra type headbands so I'll give one of them a go. I'm not using a fan because I'm setting it up in the kitchen where there's a lot of loose stuff about and it's fairly manageable at the moment although that may well change in summer.
Not using a fan is exactly why you are feeling so awful. Seriously, you need one. There are loads of articles about how overheating can do you damage, and with no air movement at all indoors, overheating can happen a lot more quickly. I use a fan all year round. It gets turned on further into the ride in the winter but it is still needed every ride.
Zwift won't disqualify you for being out of category but Zwift Power will which is like the official tool used for races. Just create an account and it will work out what cat you meant to be in. I was high C until I got my kickr, and now I am low c. :D
 

KyleS1

Distinguished Member
interesting...I rarely overheat when on my bike, but do kettlebells 3 times a week in the living room and turn the heating off and open the window (even if it's -5 outside! but I still sweat like mad...will check this out further...
Exactly that, when outside you have airflow to keep you cool. Pedaling your arse off for a couple of hours indoors with no fan is a recipe for disaster.
 

Johnmcl7

Distinguished Member
Not using a fan is exactly why you are feeling so awful. Seriously, you need one. There are loads of articles about how overheating can do you damage, and with no air movement at all indoors, overheating can happen a lot more quickly. I use a fan all year round. It gets turned on further into the ride in the winter but it is still needed every ride.
Zwift won't disqualify you for being out of category but Zwift Power will which is like the official tool used for races. Just create an account and it will work out what cat you meant to be in. I was high C until I got my kickr, and now I am low c. :D

I didn't say anything about feeling awful it's just after riding for a bit the sweat gets in my eyes so I wipe it off before it gets to that stage. Having had a very overactive thyroid I'm very familiar with overheating problems and I'm nowhere near that situation currently. I've managed 100 miles in one go this way without 'disaster' but the problem is needing to stop which isn't going to work with races.
 
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KyleS1

Distinguished Member
I didn't say anything about feeling awful it's just after riding for a bit the sweat gets in my eyes so I wipe it off before it gets to that stage. Having had a very overactive thyroid I'm very familiar with overheating problems and I'm nowhere near that situation currently. I've managed 100 miles in one go this way without 'disaster' but the problem is needing to stop which isn't going to work with races.
That's exactly what you said. Only trying to offer advice from my own experience and what I've read.

I had a go at a TT race in Zwift for the first time which is quite a cool set up but not sure I'd try it again as it really killed me, I know it's supposed to do that but felt pretty rough afterwards .
 

Johnmcl7

Distinguished Member
That quote is absolutely nothing to do with heat or sweat, as I said in the very post you quoted I'm not good at short intense rides because I normally do endurance type rides on the road bike. I feel exactly the same when doing that type of pace outside and that's how you're supposed to feel when doing TT rides at least going by friend's experiences who do them more regularly.
 
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AndyC_772

Active Member
It's good for motorcycle visors and the like, where you really want water to clear quickly. Not sure I see much point on a bike, given that you'd still need to get the mud out of the mechanical parts, and wiping the frame clean is quick and easy by comparison.

I covered my new bike with 3M Ventureshield to try and protect it from scuffs and scratches.
 

jouster

Moderator
It's good for motorcycle visors and the like, where you really want water to clear quickly. Not sure I see much point on a bike, given that you'd still need to get the mud out of the mechanical parts, and wiping the frame clean is quick and easy by comparison.

I covered my new bike with 3M Ventureshield to try and protect it from scuffs and scratches.
pretty sure these products rely on windflow to keep water off as well....it might help a bit but wont be the same
 

Qactuar

Distinguished Member
15 miles of mud, slowed down by stopping to help and old lady with her puncture... Poor thing couldn't pump air in properly!

So busy with people out walking again. Many in groups of 4+ adults and numerous kids. People genuinely don't think the rules are important.
 

inzaman

Moderator
Just getting back onto Zwift now after two months off the bike totall6y due to acl reconstruction, and meniscus repair. 20 mins was hard going at first but my power is starting to come back (i did a lot of preop physio and am doing post op physio) but wow i feel like somebody has stabbed my lungs when trying to get a strong cadence going. I used to race Group B (bottom half mind) but at the moment i'd be Group D.

Just enjoying the no pressure rides round Watopia at the moment though, although i am itching to really start and put the hammer down.
I am also hoping towards the end of the month i can actually get out on the road or along the odd canal path.
 

AndyC_772

Active Member
I enjoy Zwift, but I do sometimes find the data gathering spoils the ride.

If I've made the effort to haul myself out of bed and onto the bike, and I have a ride that feels like hard work, that's bad enough. If the power graph at the end of the ride shows that I was well down on power compared to my previous best, that's a kick up the backside I could well do without.

I'm definitely a 'D' too. Not much chance of ever being anything else TBH - but if regular exercise stops me dropping dead of a heart attack, that's all I really need.
 

jouster

Moderator
Quick 50k today and it was Wet Wet Wet.
Once I got a bit mucky I just gave up avoiding and tore through everything.

shame there was no snow left but more is forecast for next Saturday so fingers crossed.

what's it with people who just seem
Unable to conduct themselves outside. It’s like they’ve never been walking pre lockdown.

pedestrians just walking in the middle of the road when the paths are clear and expecting cars to wait for them And people on paths/trials who just don’t have no idea how to make room for others (on bikes or not).
It’s embarrassing
 

Qactuar

Distinguished Member
Quick 50k today and it was Wet Wet Wet.
Once I got a bit mucky I just gave up avoiding and tore through everything.

shame there was no snow left but more is forecast for next Saturday so fingers crossed.

what's it with people who just seem
Unable to conduct themselves outside. It’s like they’ve never been walking pre lockdown.

pedestrians just walking in the middle of the road when the paths are clear and expecting cars to wait for them And people on paths/trials who just don’t have no idea how to make room for others (on bikes or not).
It’s embarrassing
My bell on my bike is genuinely starting to wear out. It's insane.
 

KyleS1

Distinguished Member
I enjoy Zwift, but I do sometimes find the data gathering spoils the ride.

If I've made the effort to haul myself out of bed and onto the bike, and I have a ride that feels like hard work, that's bad enough. If the power graph at the end of the ride shows that I was well down on power compared to my previous best, that's a kick up the backside I could well do without.

I'm definitely a 'D' too. Not much chance of ever being anything else TBH - but if regular exercise stops me dropping dead of a heart attack, that's all I really need.
I've started doing a lot more sub 2w/kg group rides and really enjoying them. I've stopped worrying about FTP and focusing more on enjoying the ride, chatting with random people all over the world, and just getting in the kilometers. I'm not finding it a drag any more which I was when I was trying to go all out every ride.
 

Johnmcl7

Distinguished Member
I enjoy Zwift, but I do sometimes find the data gathering spoils the ride.

If I've made the effort to haul myself out of bed and onto the bike, and I have a ride that feels like hard work, that's bad enough. If the power graph at the end of the ride shows that I was well down on power compared to my previous best, that's a kick up the backside I could well do without.

I'm definitely a 'D' too. Not much chance of ever being anything else TBH - but if regular exercise stops me dropping dead of a heart attack, that's all I really need.

This is why I've avoided Zwift and using a power meter because I've focused on enjoying the ride and not the numbers, I always feel after an outdoor race I should put more effort into training another time but then realise it would probably spoil the fun and my fitness is generally good enough for what I want to do.

Ultimately I'm just wanting to maintain my fitness as well since I can't do my usual group rides over winter and I'm concerned about losing my fitness after a thyroid condition completely robbed me of it a couple of years ago. The difficulty I'm finding with Zwift is that I can't enjoy a technical ride like I can on the MTB nor a scenic route like the road bike offers so I think I'm drawn to the races to challenge myself and it's a bit disheartening how low my power level is.

Even pre lockdown I quickly found I had to be very careful around pedestrians who just step out in front of a bike or suddenly change direction without looking first because they assume they will hear a vehicle. I've never quite understood why some people choose to walk down the middle of the road spread out rather than a pavement.
 

gangzoom

Well-known Member
Ultimately I'm just wanting to maintain my fitness

Have you tried cycling outdoors?

Nothing can beat the feeling of fresh air, whilst gliding through the country side. These days you even get to see the sun rise/set.

This winter is the first one where I've keep on cycling through out. Apart from a few really wet spells (like next few day), I've been surprised how nice it is cycling in the winter, at night especially it often makes familiar roads seem totally different.

I don't think I've even opened Strava for a good few months now, winter roads aren't good for trying to set segments times, but its amazing how much enjoyment there is in cycling if you stop staring at numbers on a computer but instead sit up and look around :).

I have to confess the eBike has helped alot in keeping me going on the roads, especially when the headwinds pick up, or on some days the legs just feel tired. My current resting heart is essentially the same as the summer, its going to make a nice change come March when I can hop back on the road bike with the legs feeling as good as they did when I last took the road bike out a few months ago.

 

Johnmcl7

Distinguished Member
Have you tried cycling outdoors?

Not sure if you're being sarcastic given I've been posting photos of my bikes outdoors, I still cycle outdoors and I've been cycling through winter for many years including through the night for 24 hour races around this time. The current rules don't allow for long rides outdoors (nor is it safe in current icy conditions) and I think it will be some time before we're allowed to do proper endurance rides again and I find with no group rides I don't ride as regularly and not being pushed at all either.

Hence the indoor riding which has been worthwhile so far and I can fit it around shifts which I can't do with a mucky mountain bike and looking to get the best out of it.
 
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