The Cycling Thread

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Berties

Banned
My claim? Lol. Couldn't care less about positive reviews, more negatives in clip ons than positive, and it isn't worth risking your tyres.

Motorbiker beeped me, thought what the? Normally they don't. My rear mudguard was flapping all over the place, and almost going into the spokes. Then the front one jumps about and slides side to side. When it's bouncy rear one touches the wheel.

Crap. One of the worst purchases I've made for a bike.
 

IronGiant

Moderator
nah. One person on forum tried them rubbing, also broke near bb area. So tight around brake arm no way fit without it hitting tyre over bumps.

You often seem to tell people something is complete crap because you read that one person on one forum had a problem with them. The last thing was toe clips wasn't it? You'd heard that one person had an accident while cycling with toe clips on?.
 

Berties

Banned
You often seem to tell people something is complete crap because you read that one person on one forum had a problem with them. The last thing was toe clips wasn't it? You'd heard that one person had an accident while cycling with toe clips on?.

And my own experience.

Bought clip on guards, they're crap. Mudguards are usually fiddly to fit, but clip ons are even more so. And because they're not properly fixed, they do move during a ride. Rubber straps aren't good enough. Since only held in by one place flap around.

Used toe clips had accident and was still in the toe clip. It's a well known fact by cyclists that toe straps are more dangerous and more likely to suffer from serious ankle injury than clipless pedals.
 

weetsie

Novice Member
question regarding 26" road tyres:

i see road bikes generally have 1" wide tyres and they are normally slicks or very near.

i am after some road tyres for maybe doing some 40 odd mile rides on the road and nearly all the road tyres i am looking at are a bit wider than 1" and most of them have an option e.g 1.3" or 1.6"

just wondering what the difference is and why you would have a wider tyre? i am just looking for the most effiencent tyre on the road that doesnt cost a fortune and isnt 100% performance at the cost of durability like i assume you get for things such as races.
 

SanPedro

Well-known Member
question regarding 26" road tyres:

i see road bikes generally have 1" wide tyres and they are normally slicks or very near.

i am after some road tyres for maybe doing some 40 odd mile rides on the road and nearly all the road tyres i am looking at are a bit wider than 1" and most of them have an option e.g 1.3" or 1.6"

just wondering what the difference is and why you would have a wider tyre? i am just looking for the most effiencent tyre on the road that doesnt cost a fortune and isnt 100% performance at the cost of durability like i assume you get for things such as races.

You can run wider tyres at a lower pressure, if you want, which will make the ride more comfortable. Yet because of the carcass size it should be big enough to reduce the chance of any pinch type punctures or rim damage should you hit a kerb. They will roll a little slower, though. But that's a trade-off. Really skinny tyres need pumping up to high pressures to avoid damage and improve rolling resistance. I tried a road bike (with skinny tyres) on a short stretch of cobbles the other day... not very pleasant. :D
 

SanPedro

Well-known Member
Be careful with star nut as you can damage it. Loosen off star bolt and stem bolts.
Tighten stem bolts to recommended torque setting. Then tighen up top facing single bolt (star nut) to rec. torque setting.

Do not tighten top nut first, then stem, as it'll force bearings together too much and turning will be hard. Do not overtighthen top bolt.

Sorry bud.. this is wrong. Should always tighten the star nut first.
The star nut will pull the bearings together to the point that you have free running and no play.

Then tight up the bolts on the stem.

You can check to see if there is any play by holding onto the front brake and placing your hand around the top of the forks and bottom of the head tube. Rock the bike backwards and forwards. If you feel any play then your star nut is not tight enough. If the steering feels too stiff then you've tightened the star nut up too much.
 
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Hitby

Well-known Member
Sorry bud.. this is wrong. Should always tighten the star nut first.
The star nut will pull the bearings together to the point that you have free running and no play.

Then tight up the bolts on the stem.

You can check to see if there is any play by holding onto the front brake and placing your hand around the top of the forks and bottom of the stem. Rock the bike backwards and forwards. If you feel any play then your star nut is not tight enough. If the steering feels too stiff then you've tightened the star nut up too much.

equally, the star nut is only there in order to tighten the bearings. Once you have tightened up the bolts on the stem you can remove the top bolt from the star nut completely if you like, it doesn't serve a purpose.
 

SanPedro

Well-known Member
equally, the star nut is only there in order to tighten the bearings. Once you have tightened up the bolts on the stem you can remove the top bolt from the star nut completely if you like, it doesn't serve a purpose.

I could... but then I'd have no top cap on the top of my MTB stem :D
The bolt goes through the cap on top of the stem and/or spacers and then into the star nut. Principal is sound though. If you tighten the stem bolts 1st then you can't adjust the tension on the bearings via the star nut as the stem is now clamped to the steerer.
 

Hitby

Well-known Member
yep, just saying that it's possible :)

It's not very easy to clean mud out of the top of your fork though :D
 

inzaman

Moderator
I am doing a coast to coast bike ride of serious pain in September that is going to be taking in these two bad boys in one day bad boy 1 and bad boy 2.

I feel good for the mileage but the aggressive gradients on the climbs with my current gearing of 36/46 crank and 11-28 cassette is keeping me awake at night. I would be using my Cyclocross bike as i would not want to ditch the carbon fibre machine on a descent :rolleyes:

My current gearing gives a ratio at the lowest of 1.29 but i feel as though i am going to need a lower ratio to have a chance.
I think my options are, replace the crank with a three ring (it would hurt the pride having to go down to the bottom ring but this would be better than cracking). Extend the cassette to more than 28 teeth on a Shimano Tiagra rear mech? Or can you get a small compact - say 50/30 so nearly 1:1?

I believe the shifters, Shimano Sora, can handle a three speed crank so it would just be the crank or would i have to change the front mech as well? again Shimano Sora.

Are these my only options and what would the cheapest option be as i would just switch it back out after the ride as i have no need for such low ratio's on the roads around where i live - unless i can get a 50/30 or less than 30 compact?
 
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mr:w

Well-known Member
Should always tighten the star nut first.
The star nut will pull the bearings together to the point that you have free running and no play.

Then tight up the bolts on the stem.

Spot on, took a few attempts to get it right when flipping my stem to get more drop on the bars.

Also, if changing the height of the stem by moving any of the spacers (like giant washers) above or below the stem, put them back above / below the stem. Sounds obvious but I removed one spacer then couldn't work out why there was play in the headset when everything was tightened... :facepalm:
 

Berties

Banned
Sorry bud.. this is wrong. Should always tighten the star nut first.

Only a tad. finger tight with allen key just to pull fork up a litle but not so much bearings are pressing against each other with a lot of force. If you tighten star bolt to 6nm straight turning will be hard.

Tigthen, but certainly not tightened to 6nm.
 
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Berties

Banned
I believe the shifters, Shimano Sora, can handle a three speed crank so it would just be the crank or would i have to change the front mech as well? again Shimano Sora.

To change from a double to a triple you need shifter, new bottom bracket, chainset and front derailler.

Buy a new bike. Would be cheaper lol.

The best you could do is change cassette. Over a certain size you may long a long cage rear derailler, say around 28 tooth.
 
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figoagogo

Distinguished Member
I am doing a coast to coast bike ride of serious pain in September that is going to be taking in these two bad boys in one day bad boy 1 and bad boy 2.

I feel good for the mileage but the aggressive gradients on the climbs with my current gearing of 36/46 crank and 11-28 cassette is keeping me awake at night. I would be using my Cyclocross bike as i would not want to ditch the carbon fibre machine on a descent :rolleyes:

My current gearing gives a ratio at the lowest of 1.29 but i feel as though i am going to need a lower ratio to have a chance.
I think my options are, replace the crank with a three ring (it would hurt the pride having to go down to the bottom ring but this would be better than cracking). Extend the cassette to more than 28 teeth on a Shimano Tiagra rear mech? Or can you get a small compact - say 50/30 so nearly 1:1?

I believe the shifters, Shimano Sora, can handle a three speed crank so it would just be the crank or would i have to change the front mech as well? again Shimano Sora.

Are these my only options and what would the cheapest option be as i would just switch it back out after the ride as i have no need for such low ratio's on the roads around where i live - unless i can get a 50/30 or less than 30 compact?

I would go with a double compact chainset up front, and if needed bigger (MTB) cassette + (MTB) mech at the rear, or SRAM Apex (but its only MTB stuff re-badged)

A triple chainset will not really give an advantage, may be a slightly lower gear, and some choices inbetween, but IMO not worth the hassel?

I did the Coast to Cost (Morcambe to Bridlington) carrying all my gear, even though it was road I opted for the MTB with slicks, just to give me the additional help on the climbs (first day has 2 killer climbs). I do have a racer but could not afford to change to a compact etc. The larger chain rings are fine for where I live, but on a steep climb its hard work, and the frame/wheels flex a tad :eek:

Still the MTB did well got me up all those hills and ahead of everyone, and I could keep up with the 1 x tourer and 2 x racers on the flat, a bit slower down hill. :thumbsup: MTB type gearing should get you up any hill.
 
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weetsie

Novice Member
i have a few problems with my bike :(

the rear derailer is not right, it touches and bangs against the frame and takes the paint off even if you adjust it to the max, it apears a screw is missing and the one that isnt is completely mashed, had to use mole grips to get it out. also the rear break is not working properly, at high speeds even if you slam it on it doesnt have any noticable effect.
the chain and sprockets have also seen better day, they work fine, they are just very worn.

the seller didnt mention any of this, problem is i have already said thanks to the seller and said everything is good, not sure i can go saying it needs a load of work doing now :facepalm:
 

Dave

Distinguished Member
weetsie said:
i have a few problems with my bike :(

the rear derailer is not right, it touches and bangs against the frame and takes the paint off even if you adjust it to the max, it apears a screw is missing and the one that isnt is completely mashed, had to use mole grips to get it out. also the rear break is not working properly, at high speeds even if you slam it on it doesnt have any noticable effect.
the chain and sprockets have also seen better day, they work fine, they are just very worn.

the seller didnt mention any of this, problem is i have already said thanks to the seller and said everything is good, not sure i can go saying it needs a load of work doing now :facepalm:

If it's ebay you can still open a dispute, try that first.

Failing that, roll your sleeves up and prepare to learn a lot about the mechanics of a bike. None of the problems should cost a load to sort and are mostly routine anyway which you can easily do yourself.
 

inzaman

Moderator
yeah I wouldn't change a double to a triple, or triple to a double, too expensive. Change cassette to largest rear derailler supports, and/or change chainrings, if front derailler allows. If not, if it's really hilly all the you could change chainring to a smaller one , and set it to single chainring up front, so just using casette gearing.

ie like this

http://image.made-in-china.com/2f0j...ed-City-Bike-Lady-Bike-Bicycle-AYS-2419S-.jpg

I might be on the max for the rear at 28t but the front is a very good idea as I woulnt have to change the shifter or the front mech.

The other alternative is to use a road bike I gave to my bro last year as that has the front three chain rings and I could just swap out the rear cassette?
I did fancy doing it on the cyclocross bike though as the frame well seating position and additional break levers installed at the front will give me more confidence on the descents as they look pretty severe.
 

inzaman

Moderator
mattrixdesign2 said:
I would go with a double compact chainset up front, and if needed bigger (MTB) cassette + (MTB) mech at the rear, or SRAM Apex (but its only MTB stuff re-badged)

A triple chainset will not really give an advantage, may be a slightly lower gear, and some choices inbetween, but IMO not worth the hassel?

I did the Coast to Cost (Morcambe to Bridlington) carrying all my gear, even though it was road I opted for the MTB with slicks, just to give me the additional help on the climbs (first day has 2 killer climbs). I do have a racer but could not afford to change to a compact etc. The larger chain rings are fine for where I live, but on a steep climb its hard work, and the frame/wheels flex a tad :eek:

Still the MTB did well got me up all those hills and ahead of everyone, and I could keep up with the 1 x tourer and 2 x racers on the flat, a bit slower down hill. :thumbsup: MTB type gearing should get you up any hill.

Excellent another good option, I could get a 34 t rear and try it with my rear mech to see if it works? If not swap it for the apex assuming I can get a 9 speed one as that is what my shifter is? I could then maybe try and drop the smaller crank down to 30 which would give me more confidence. I can get up 15% or maybe slightly more grades with the current gearing and staying seated. It is just when you see 30% and for 2.5k i know I just cannot stand that entire time and would either blow or just not be able to push the power to get me up!!!

How did you find it and how many days did you do it over?
 

weetsie

Novice Member
If it's ebay you can still open a dispute, try that first.

Failing that, roll your sleeves up and prepare to learn a lot about the mechanics of a bike. None of the problems should cost a load to sort and are mostly routine anyway which you can easily do yourself.

the bike was on ebay but we dealt outside ebay because he didnt want to accept paypal so i suggested taking it off ebay and i send him a BT.

i am not really wondering what i would do if he isnt helpful, if hes not intrested then thats that. i am just wondering what to say and what to ask for, infact i dont even know what i should ask for, should i ask for some money back to pay for repairs to get it to as advertised condition?

i will have a look on youtube for videos on how to fix the bike up, if i do it myself it could cost me nothing as i think its possible its fixable without parts.
 

Robothamster

Distinguished Member
If you bought the bike 2nd hand then the normal acceptance is 'sold as seen' - once the exchange is made you take responsibility for any problems.

Obviously not the case if you bought from a shop or dealer of some sort.

As Dave said, doesn't sound like anything major though, and definitely worth an email to the seller mentioning the problems and asking if he has any ideas what is wrong, he may offer to give a bit of money back out of good will if he accepts it's not as described, although I think if it was a 2nd hand sale he could pretty much say tough.
 

weetsie

Novice Member
if he says tuff then thats fine, i wont really think any less of him, possibly because i still think i got a good deal regardless.
 

Berties

Banned
Sounds like end stops not setup right, that stops the derailler putting the chain between large cassette sprocket and spokes, and smallest cassette sprocket and frame. As for brakes that depends, but usually want the pads closest to the rim as possible, loosen pads clamp down lever then tighten down pad, centre it with the little adjuster allen, then adjust so a little bit of a gap, with barrell adjuster fully in, cable pulled tight then clamp down.

If you use cassette or chainring from another bike, the chain would be worn to your bits, so you'll wear other bits in more by using differently worn components.


I might be on the max for the rear at 28t but the front is a very good idea as I woulnt have to change the shifter or the front mech.

You wouldn't need to change anything, except for different chainring. About £15, and cheapest solution I can think of. Might need to remove front derailler altogether as chain will reach lower and probably rub on the piece that connects inner and outer cage up. But if a single front, cassette rear is enough for hilly ride, I'd stick with that.
 
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