The Cycling Thread: Part 3

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IronGiant

Moderator
What I was thinking of doing was only contacting him if they identify damage specifically caused by the crash. If there's nothing needing done besides the usual servicing, I will leave it there. Anyone think I am being foolish? I'm not a big fan of the whole claim culture but some people at work are saying I am being stupidly naive - lots of stories about people getting brand new bikes after similar accidents, etc. I'm not really comfortable with that.
I'm with you on that one kav :thumbsup: The likelihood is he won't be putting it through his insurance so if you put in a spurious claim you would be punishing him directly, does he need punishing that much if it was a genuine accident/mistake? Rhetorical question aimed at your colleagues not you :)
 

aVdub

Distinguished Member
I would check with the driver and point out possible damaged areas (if possible) in future and include a witness.
I know this is not possible now, but he could come back and say that you have to prove he caused it.
 

redboy1

Well-known Member
That's pretty high for trail use (IMO). They'll roll fast on hardpack and roads but may get a bit sketchy on rocks n roots n stuff. Being chunky 2.3s you can probably run at 35psi to give you more grip... especially where it's needed on the front. Risk of pinchflat punctures is less with big volume tyres :smashin:
Thanks, ive got them pumped that much as im commuting to work and back on it which is 70% roads and 30% canal. when i go XC ill be reducing the pressures. :smashin: Really surprised how well they roll, thought id get some vibrations on the roads but there is nothing.
 

figoagogo

Distinguished Member
Although I love cycling, and cycle to work on a busy road... I think in some respects it is quite dangerous, I have had 1near miss and one incidient on my bike, zero in my car over the same period... none of which I was at fault.

I have been knocked off from stationary at a set of traffic lights (on RED) at 8am on a Sunday morning - by a horse-truck-lorry thing. I have had an oncoming Mercedes driver turn right in front of me, as I was going 20mph+ forcing me to do a rather impressive endo!

I make the effort to keep myself safe, multiple lights, yellow back back cover, yellow band around my ankle, relfective strips on my jacket and a helmet.

I feel safe when out in the country side/hills etc... but in busy areas and at peak I am always aware that something could happen, I am not sure what cycling through a city would be like, glad I don't need to. Still love it though.
 

kav

Distinguished Member
Thanks for the advice above, that's pretty much the way I was thinking too.

Although I love cycling, and cycle to work on a busy road... I think in some respects it is quite dangerous, I have had 1near miss and one incidient on my bike, zero in my car over the same period... none of which I was at fault.

I have been knocked off from stationary at a set of traffic lights (on RED) at 8am on a Sunday morning - by a horse-truck-lorry thing. I have had an oncoming Mercedes driver turn right in front of me, as I was going 20mph+ forcing me to do a rather impressive endo!

I make the effort to keep myself safe, multiple lights, yellow back back cover, yellow band around my ankle, relfective strips on my jacket and a helmet.

I feel safe when out in the country side/hills etc... but in busy areas and at peak I am always aware that something could happen, I am not sure what cycling through a city would be like, glad I don't need to. Still love it though.
I cycle through Glasgow at rush hour, between all the buses, taxis, harassed drivers and spaced out pedestrians it's a bit unnerving I must admit. You have to cycle completely defensively, putting the boot down is very dodgy as obeying the highway code only gets you so far when there are so many people who have no regard for cyclists whatsoever. Of course some cyclists make the issue worse by disregarding the highway code when it suits them.
 

GBDG1

Distinguished Member
Glad to hear you're OK Frank. After a while you develop a bit of a sixth sense about what drivers are going to do. You're probably doing these already, but in case not i'll mention them:

1. Always make eye contact with drivers waiting to pull out of side roads
2. Pull out into the road a little and control the traffic behind you, that way you're leaving a little more space to give you more options/places to go, should they pull out.

You might also want to look at one of these:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B000PTIJB8/?tag=hydra0b-21&hvadid=9550946949&ref=asc_df_B000PTIJB8

There are a few vids of people using them on you tube - they defo do the job :)
 

Ultima

Well-known Member
SanPedro said:
So how did it go?
Bike still in one piece? ;)
I really enjoyed it! The session started at 7pm and finished just after 9.30pm. Basic start covering what each component does and then onto cleaning and lubing. Finished with removing and replacing tyres and inner tubes and mending punctures.

There were 10 of us and 4 instructors. Each gave a little input and tips how they did a particular job. Three of them worked for the training centre and one worked as a bike mechanic for Evans Cycles.

Looking forward to next week now:)
 
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kav

Distinguished Member
Glad to hear you're OK Frank. After a while you develop a bit of a sixth sense about what drivers are going to do. You're probably doing these already, but in case not i'll mention them:

1. Always make eye contact with drivers waiting to pull out of side roads
2. Pull out into the road a little and control the traffic behind you, that way you're leaving a little more space to give you more options/places to go, should they pull out.

You might also want to look at one of these:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B000PTIJB8/?tag=hydra0b-21&hvadid=9550946949&ref=asc_df_B000PTIJB8

There are a few vids of people using them on you tube - they defo do the job :)
Thanks mate, good advice. I used to cycle a lot back home so I tend to do the things you mention (though I should probably do more of number 2). I have to say drivers in the UK seem to have much lower consideration for cyclists than elsewhere - possibly because there are fewer cyclists here in comparison to other countries? I've been driving over here for 10+ years and cyclists are a relative rarity in comparison to home.

Regarding that air horn, I was looking at them a few weeks back thinking it would be great fun - I may just get one now, for more serious reasons.
 
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inzaman

Moderator
I really enjoyed it! The session started at 7pm and finished just after 9.30pm. Basic start covering what each component does and then onto cleaning and lubing. Finished with removing and replacing tyres and inner tubes and mending punctures.
And by the end of the 10 week course we would have built this time machine looking bike
here :D:eek:
 

inzaman

Moderator
Kav....really glad you are ok and safe.
+1.

I had an accident a few years ago where i hit the back of a car. I was behind a car going down a descent and a lorry coming the other way came around the corner in the middle of the road - the car stopped and i just couldn't stop/react in time. There was no damage to myself or the bike (apart from a scratched rear mech) but it did shake me up a lot and since then i like to think i am more careful.
I personally hate being in loads of traffic and the advise above is all good imx.
I try to get out into the country lanes where possible although that brings other hazards - tractors, and i have even had near head ons with other cyclists coming the opposite three abreast :rolleyes:
 

booyaka

Moderator
Be careful - he "may" turn round and say you hit him and ask you to pay for the damage to his car. I would be tempted to contact him just to check his details are above board and just mention that you have the bike in for a service to check any damage and that you may pursue the cost of any replacement/damaged parts if needed. You don't want to but if necessary you will.

Glad your ok - also make sure you check your helmet properly. You should consider replacing a helmet if it's involved in any kind of accident/bash etc.
 

Ultima

Well-known Member
Bloody expensive this biking lark. Just bought a new helmet, track pump and some cleaning stuff and that's another 100 quid spent. Glad I got the 3 for 2 offer that's on at Halfords :)
 

SanPedro

Well-known Member
I really enjoyed it! The session started at 7pm and finished just after 9.30pm. Basic start covering what each component does and then onto cleaning and lubing. Finished with removing and replacing tyres and inner tubes and mending punctures.

There were 10 on the ourselves and 4 instructors. Each gave a little input and tips how they did a particular job. Three of them worked for the training centre and one worked as a bike mechanic for Evans Cycles.

Looking forward to next week now:)
:thumbsup:
I find the basic principles of bike maintenance simple enough, but the application takes some practice sometimes :laugh:
I refitted wheel bearings back into hubs recently and then making sure they're tightened just-so ie 'free-running/no play', using cone spanners... drove me nuts. The tiniest bit out and they're either grinding away or loose as hell. But thankfully it's not the sort of thing done every day.

Sometimes, though, it's knowing what the hell is wrong sometimes. My gears were skipping all over the place recently. Spent ages trying to index them with no success. Then somebody said it was more likely grime in the cables. One new set of cables later and bingo... smooth as anything.
 

kav

Distinguished Member
Thanks all for the good advice. I'm reasonably confident that the helmet is okay as it has one of those peaks that supposedly improves aerodynamics that sits on top of the shell, and it was this that hit rather than the helmet itself.

I have phoned the taxi company and left a message for the driver advising him that I'm getting the bike checked out. (The driver and I discussed this briefly yesterday evening and I've been in touch with the witness too, so I'm reasonably confident if anything needs repaired, I'll be able to progress it.)
 

sergiup

Distinguished Member
kav said:
Thanks all for the good advice. I'm reasonably confident that the helmet is okay as it has one of those peaks that supposedly improves aerodynamics that sits on top of the shell, and it was this that hit rather than the helmet itself.

I have phoned the taxi company and left a message for the driver advising him that I'm getting the bike checked out. (The driver and I discussed this briefly yesterday evening and I've been in touch with the witness too, so I'm reasonably confident if anything needs repaired, I'll be able to progress it.)
Glad you came out relatively unscathed!
Some of us have little choice about traffic etc as we cycle in Central London - although to be honest it all comes down to cycling defensively and being as aware as you can be of your surroundings. In my 4 years or so of commuting roughly half the time on a bike I've never come off, and only had a handful of close calls - knock on wood!
 

SanPedro

Well-known Member
Thanks, ive got them pumped that much as im commuting to work and back on it which is 70% roads and 30% canal. when i go XC ill be reducing the pressures. :smashin: Really surprised how well they roll, thought id get some vibrations on the roads but there is nothing.
Know what you mean... just replaced a set of Maxxis Minion supertacky compound tyres. These rolled like they were made from blu-tack. Unbelievably draggy + THE NOISE.

Swapped them for some Continental Diesel tyres in 2.5 (mahoosive I know!) and they roll like I'm on a road bike or something. And so far they seem to grip ok in the wet.
 

inzaman

Moderator
Know what you mean... just replaced a set of Maxxis Minion supertacky compound tyres. These rolled like they were made from blu-tack. Unbelievably draggy + THE NOISE.

.
They are what i have on my MCM that i dragged around the peaks on Saturday, super tacky 42A up front and 60A compound on the rear.
It was pretty arduous going up the climbs but coming down made up for it as they stick very well.
I went out on my other MTB Tuesday night and it felt like a road bike in comparison :D
 

mr:w

Well-known Member
Does anyone use any sort of bike stand for converting a bike as an exercise bike in the winter months??
I've got one of these, bought it earlier in the year when the wife was training for a ride.

Takes 30 seconds to fit, works on any bike and is pretty much silent. If you've got a bike computer that measures cadence even better, as you can use the thousands of plans on here.

Excellent piece of kit imo. :thumbsup:
 

eireann10

Well-known Member
I've got one of these, bought it earlier in the year when the wife was training for a ride.

Takes 30 seconds to fit, works on any bike and is pretty much silent. If you've got a bike computer that measures cadence even better, as you can use the thousands of plans on here.

Excellent piece of kit imo. :thumbsup:
looking to get myself something similar

do you use the same rear wheel / tyre or do you use a training tyre?
 

mr:w

Well-known Member
I use the same tyre and have clocked up maybe 200 miles without shredding it.

I use Vittoria Rubinos so easier to replace at £10 each than buying a dedicated wheel / cassette / turbo trainer tyre. :)
 

eireann10

Well-known Member
thanks

I had just heard / read of people buying a training tyre or and a spare rear wheel

Didnt really want to go down that route / expense.
 

inzaman

Moderator
looking to get myself something similar

do you use the same rear wheel / tyre or do you use a training tyre?
I used to use a separate training tyre and found it better than a normal tyre tbh - less slip and more consistent spinning. I had a separate rear wheel though so i could just swap the wheel out - in fact towards the end of using it i had a separate bike ;)

I no longer use a trainer over winter preferring to get out where possible as i found that with the trainer, even if doing pyramid intervals or general interval training (which is the best use imx), i would still blow up when going out on the road and particularly going up hills until i had more road miles in my legs.

Now over winter in the week i either go mountain biking, do road intervals, or crank power work (this is great btw). Weekends i try and get out on the Saturday morning if not persisting it down.

Robothamster said:
Anyone bought one of these?

New CREE XML XM-L T6 1800LM LED Bicycle bike Head Light Lamp | eBay
We use them for mountain biking and they are great, light up a pitch black trail very well, in fact when the six or seven of us have then on it can be like daytime :D I linked to something similar or even that one in the previous cycling thread.
 

Robothamster

Distinguished Member
We use them for mountain biking and they are great, light up a pitch black trail very well, in fact when the six or seven of us have then on it can be like daytime :D I linked to something similar or even that one in the previous cycling thread.
What's the battery life like? A couple of hours per charge?
 
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