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The AVForums Ultimate TV Buying Guide

MikeTVMikeTV

Well-known Member
Great guide, useful reading there.

Would just add don't buy a Samsung which is "future proof" as theyve released two upgrade kits so far which rarely work and aren't bothering letting people upgrade to the new smart platform as they would obviously prefer you purchased a new TV.

Take a view film trailers on a USB stick and have a play with the settings on various TVs you are interested in, always difficult under showroom conditions but at least you can see if there is any judder.
 

NickInWiltshire

Well-known Member
I think you are clinging onto the plasma past a bit in that guide! Let it go!!:)

For 2015 the only meaningful choices are

LED LCD - the most common format. Choose IPS for wide viewing angles or VA for deep blacks. Any LCD TV must have its brightness and backlight levels set accurately for good results. They all look bad if they are over-driven.

LCD with FALD - only available on high-end TVs. Was out of fashion but might make a return in 2015.

OLED - excellent brightness with deep blacks and good viewing angles. Very expensive at present and reliability is not known. Only available from LG so far.

Features:
Full HD 1080x1920
- most sets except for the very smallest budget sets. All that is needed for broadcast TV and blu-ray.

"4K" 2160x3840 - twice the vertical and horizontal resolution. A few clips and shows available via streaming. Apart from that you are just watching 1080x1920 upscaled. "4K" no longer (if it ever did) means "future proofed".

"UHD Alliance" - will offer 4K resolution plus HDR plus wide colour gamut. Best choice if you want to buy a 4K set in 2015 but there is still no guarantee of "future proofing" yet with any of these sets.

Despite all the noise about 'quantum dot' it doesn't matter if they use quantum dots or not. If they offer the colour gamut supported by the UHD Alliance it doesn't matter how they do it.

As for HDR I am beginning to see that it is no more than a description of the number of bits allocated to brightness and how they are interpreted. In theory you could support HDR input on a set with any contrast ratio. Then BT1886 then tells you how to map the HDR input onto your set's capabilities. So HDR/UHD alone does not provide any guarantee of a good contrast ratio. HDR just lets the best sets look a lot better with the right material.
 

avbill1

Active Member
That's right. An OLED without HDR is going to be massively better than an LCD with HDR, unless you spend your life obsessively looking at sunsets counting the steps in gradation. It's just another bit of desparate marketing by companies unable to get OLED manufacturing under control, rather like 4k for most rooms with a normal sized TV.
 

gamemaker

Active Member
Great Year indeed as the guide says....
Also the Year of the Sheep...auspicious year and good for TV buying than ever before and not a coincident.
If you can afford it,Oled 4k is the wet dreams of TV.As if that wasn't enough...A killer 4K Oled EG9903 is coming that can change screen curvature to flat , with new antiscreen coating and 10 core processors and bespoke Harmon Kardon sound bar.
Plasmas would be outgunned.....
The CES Oled showcases from LG was like an altar, especially the stand with the 4k display with a diamond necklaces on a black velvet background.That display said it all.No words needed.It was simple yet loaded with symbolism of perfection and demure for the format.

I am tempted to say hold back till you can afford 4k Oled....the 'only ever TV you will need'.But you have to be practical and realistic as 4k Oled will be too expensive for most.1080p Oled is just a fling......!
Lots of great prospect in Oled tech but on the 'other side of the world"....on this side we aren't going to get into the parahenalia.
In China Hisense,Konka,Changhong are doing 4k Oled and LG.....that is 4 manufacturers at least into the fray!
(Behind the scenes we hear of inkjet printing technology of large Oled substrate panels to make them cheaper from Dupon,Seilko Epson,Japan display etc )Very very positive news.But will need more customers also buying to get the price down.A real problem this is going to be here.

QD LED TV 4k are for certain audience who has been bitten and smitten with the w905 etc from 2012.Like a nicotine fix that we prefer to stick with and with the 'right material' like games,wide gamut digital medias 'you think you have an OLED'.If you are just into bluray and movies then no point in paying the premium for those sets.(exceptions are the Sony 4k remastered ones with wide gamut TV it really shows)
Samsung are doing QDs TV but I have learnt it isn't going to be mainstream so cost will be high!

There is still LED 1080p...now cheap and cheerful.

As a parting note,I would not be too dismissive on HDR.It works and improves LED performance which it is welcomed.Can never say No to progress, OLED will be unaffordable for a mass market appeal...and till it is affordable HDR is welcome boost.

In an analogy....
'If you can't afford real diamonds there is always Swarovski crystals'
 
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airbedman

Active Member
Interesting read, I still can't decide how to replace my 8 year old 720p Panasonic plasma though. LG or Panny that's my dilemma.
 

malk

Well-known Member
me too, my trusty Toshiba 37WLT68 popped yesterady, im going to try the classifieds on here, to try and get a half decent one, for a bit less cash than the shops.
Which one though?
 

gamemaker

Active Member
Get what you can afford...an oled if you can.You wouldn't need another TV ever....save money in that respect.

Europe is a damp squid for OLED.It really sucks! I say with a heavy heart.In South Korea they sold 1000 in a month in 2014? No other way to put it this is not the place to be for Oled worship.There is just talk....
 

dspit1664

Active Member
Don’t shoot me only asking I see this article was written in 2015 it’s now almost 2020. I’m guessing a lot has changed in tv tech etc. I’m no tv tech expert at all. Will this article be updated ? 😁
 

Dodgexander

Moderator
Don’t shoot me only asking I see this article was written in 2015 it’s now almost 2020. I’m guessing a lot has changed in tv tech etc. I’m no tv tech expert at all. Will this article be updated ? 😁
Every year AVF do a end of year best buy guide, this is just an article from 2015. Here's last years: Editor's Choice Awards – Best TVs 2018

I also make my own user guide, which I will have out soon.
 

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