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Testing Subs

Discussion in 'Subwoofers' started by jimbowley, Nov 9, 2004.

  1. jimbowley

    jimbowley
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    Hi, I'm going to make a tube sub (or two) and would like to evaluate them. Can anyone give me a quick pointer to what test gear I'd need and how much it would cost. Also what's the box that's used to tune the sub to the room?

    Do we have forum members with this gear that are willing test my sub if I bring it to them? I'd especially like to compare my sub to a decent off the shelf one that they own.

    I remember a thread where someone was planning an all-comers shoot-out. Did that happen or is it being planned still?

    thanks, jim
     
  2. eviljohn2

    eviljohn2
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    There's the budget sub test sticky at the top of this forum.

    The problem with testing subs is that for a sensible comparison to be made they really need to be in the same room in an identical position as room acoustics play such a major part.

    The simplest way to analyse a subs response though is to download a signal generator such as SigJenny and connect your computer to your AV gear or acquire some test tones which you can burn to a CD. You'll then need an SPL meter, these aren't too reliable at low frequencies (another good reason why it's best to test multiple subs at the same time in the same location using the same equipment). You can then plot the frequency response (ie. the SPL at each frequency which you play out).

    Unless you spend an absolute fortune on professional sound analysis gear then this is about the best that's possible. It'll only provide a rough guide and the results aren't really comparable to any that have been taken elsewhere but they're better than nothing.

    Of course that's just taking into account outright sound pressure, the difficult part is to measure distortion levels...
     
  3. rob_w

    rob_w
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    I use the behringer ecm8000 mic, behringer shark mic pre, and trueRTA software. approx £200 ish.

    Works well for me and you can calculate distortion from a chart provided in the help files.

    I -think- the next step up would be ETF software, which I may buy next year if funds come through.

    Cheers,

    Rob
     

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