terminate all ethernet wire to female jack panel or let them loose with male end connecting to a switch?

mickevh

Distinguished Member
For 21 cable terminations, I wouldn't think for more than a second before deciding a PP was the way to go. A basic 24 port PP is only a few tens of pounds.

If you don't fancy the hassle of installing proper rack framing to mount it on to, for an "out of sight" install, you could probably just screw a PP to a couple of stout wooden battens. It really only needs enough stand off round the back to accommodate the cables. I don't think such a mounting option contravenes the "cat" standards. ;-)

I guess it's unlikely you'll ever de-mount it, but just in case, I prefer to "lead in" all the cable runs from one side of the PP and leave a bit of slack on the cable "snake" beyond so I've got some wiggle room to demount the PP and swing it to get round the back in future if needbe.

Some (velcro) cable ties are very useful for keeping the cable snake under control.

Doubtless the cabling professionals can comment on whether this is considered good or bad practice.

For this number of cables, you would be well advised to label them. Nothing fancy - just ascribe each cable a number from 1-21 and label each end of each cable lobe accordingly. It's surprising how quickly one forgets which goes where. If you wanted to go totally pro, you'd then write a "patching schedule" describing which goes where e.g. "1: Kitchen, 2:Kitchen, 3:Lounge, 4:Bedroom, etc." - again it doesn't need to be anything fancy. Tuck the schedule into a plastic bag and leave it in the cupboard with everything else. Future owners will thank you for doing so.
 
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coolmanfever

Standard Member
another concern I have is....how to tell if these cables are for sure solid cord?

Based on my research only solid cord can terminate into RJ45 jack.
 

Kristian

Well-known Member
another concern I have is....how to tell if these cables are for sure solid cord?

Based on my research only solid cord can terminate into RJ45 jack.

Strip back the sheath and insulation of one of the cable/cores and have a look. Also, stranded cable is very flexible, solid isn't.

Regarding the patch panel, as there are 21 cables, I'd definitely be using a PP as the other guys have said.
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
Often it's printed on the cable sheathing - dust a bit off and see if you can see anything, sometimes stranded cable is labelled "patch" and often there's a manufacturers serial number so you can go look up the spec.
 

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