Tenda Nova MW3

sharonsa

Novice Member
Hi all,
I Have 3 nods of the Tenda Nova MW3.
One is connected to the main modem. A strange thing happens when I connect another node far from the main node - the internet speed decreases significantly when I am near the secondary node. If I unplug the secondary node, then the internet speed increases again (even though I'm far from the main unit).
Any ideas?
Thank you in advance
 

neilball

Well-known Member
If you are using them in wireless extender mode rather than wired a wired ethernet connection as the backhaul then you will get a significant drop in speed due to wifi/wireless extenders work - a wireless extenders effectively halves the bandwidth of the link. More expensive system add a dedicated third radio for the wireless link between modes to avoid this impact.

So the only improvement you can make when using as wireless extenders is to ensure that there is a very good 5GHz signal link at each mesh node to keep link speeds up. If you have the units placed so the signal/link rate is low then it will only seem very much slower when the rate is halved once the mesh is established.
 

sharonsa

Novice Member
Thank you for your comprehensive answer. I though that the whole point of this system is to extend the range wirelessly.
How do I ensure that there is a very good 5GHz signal link at each mesh node?
Thanks again
 

neilball

Well-known Member
It does what is says, but performance is very different depending on whether you connect the mesh nodes via wired ethernet or link them wirelessly. There’s no realistic difference between different brands unless you upgrade to tri-band systems.

I’ve not used the agenda system before, but expect that there setup/management app should allow you to check the signal between nodes to aid with best placement.
 

sharonsa

Novice Member
It does what is says, but performance is very different depending on whether you connect the mesh nodes via wired ethernet or link them wirelessly. There’s no realistic difference between different brands unless you upgrade to tri-band systems.

I’ve not used the agenda system before, but expect that there setup/management app should allow you to check the signal between nodes to aid with best placement.
Thank you very much for your help
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
Thank you for your comprehensive answer. I though that the whole point of this system is to extend the range wirelessly.

Of course, it has, but at the penalty of performance. They just don't tell you that on the tin!

In Wi-Fi networking "only one thing at a time can transmit" - which includes the node-to-node tranmissions in so-called "mesh" systems. So if a packet (message) is being relayed N1---N2---C the N1---N2 and N2---C cannot occur at the same time, which doubles the apparent end-to-end journey time which manifests as a halving in throughput (speed.) The more mesh nodes you add, the worse this effect gets.

If you then compound the effect because (for example) the signalling conditions between N1---N2 are not very good, it can lead to a further reduction in speed (or increase in transmissions time) and performance drops again.

For this reason, when large system builders are deploying Wi-Fi solutions, we always avoid using "mesh" if we possibly can and use wired ethernet backhauls between the AP's and the rest of the (wired) network.

The transmissions over the wires can occur concurrency with the Wi-Fi transmissions and in a "cellular" network of multiple Wi-FI hotspots we tune the radio channels used so that neighbouring cells use different frequencies so that they can transmit/receive concurrently with their neighbours. Mesh systems, particularly the cheap ones, often cannot do this.
 
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