Tell me why I should dvi

Discussion in 'Computer Components' started by Decadent Fool, Sep 6, 2007.

  1. Decadent Fool

    Decadent Fool
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    Guys and gals, I'd like to know why I should use dvi to my tv from my graphics card (ati 2600pro).

    Analogue vga signal seems fine to me, and I also have a dvi to component adaptor to use if the mood takes me. But I'm sure there must be a good reason to use dvi; I'd like someone to tell me why :) Currently looking at pixel mapping, is that all?
     
  2. Steven

    Steven
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    If your GPU has DVI and your monitor has DVI, theoretically a pure digital --> digital connection is best

    Theoretically speaking of course. If you don't notice a difference in practice, then that gives you versatility in hooking up various electronic equipment to your monitor
     
  3. Wonka

    Wonka
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    dvi is better quality, particularly at higher resolutions :)
     
  4. Decadent Fool

    Decadent Fool
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    Thanks both.

    What resolutions are we taking about here? 50" projectors? I couldn't see any difference on my 32" tx32 @ 720. I would obviously rather be wholly digital from a theoretical point of view, and understand why, but I'd like to know if there's any other reason. :)

    'Pixel mapping' doesn't seem worth it, but I want someone to prove me wrong :)
     
  5. Steven

    Steven
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    1:1 pixel mapping means only the exact number of pixels are used to display a image

    e.g. you have a 24" 1920x1200 display. The source is 800x600. The monitor would literally only use 800x600 to display the source resulting in a black border all around the image

    There is also "fill" which means the image is stretched to fill the whole display. Obviously not ideal unless you can put up with an odd image

    "Aspect" means keeping the aspect ratio and filling as much of the screen as possible, leaving black bars
     

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