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Tech Query - 16:9 or 15:9

Discussion in 'LCD & LED LCD TVs Forum' started by deeplyblue, May 8, 2005.

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  1. deeplyblue

    deeplyblue
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    This is quick (I hope) query - if someone has a link to a good explanation that would do just fine. I've seen mention that some screens have 15:9 instead of 16:9 and that "some people have problems with this" - can anyone tell me (1) why some screens have the 15:9 if everyone prefers 16:9 and (2) what problems occur as a result and (3) which screens are affected?

    db
     
  2. ianh64

    ianh64
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    Broadcast HD is a widescreen format generally either 1280x720 or 1920x1080. These are 16:9 formats. If you watch them on a 15:9 display (typically for LCD 1280x768 with square pixels), the image is either going have its aspect ratio stretched vertically, letter boxed or cropped at the sides.

    16:9 LCD's are generally 1366x768 with square pixels. To view 16:9 material, the image will either be scaled to fit or view as a bordered image, but either way, the correct aspect ration will be maintained.

    Films and other DVD material is another matter and it is possible that other aspect ratios will be used do letter boxing or cropping may be inevitable to some degree. But a DVD player would normally allow the correct aspect ratio to be maintained with the 4:3 or 16:9 setting in the player. But if set to 16:9 the aspect ration would be incorrect on a 15:9 screen.

    LCD screens are normally square pixel, so the physical dimensions of the screen will have the same proportions as the number of pixels so it is quite easy to check. Watch out for some 15:9 screens actually being quoted as 16:9 widescreen. The other thing to watch is that 15:9 panels may be a generation older than 16:9 screens, so there could be picture differences between the two too.

    -Ian
     

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