Tablet vaccine

krish

Distinguished Member
That is VXA-CoV2-1 from US company Vaxart. There's a similar oral vaccine, OraPro-COVID-19, from British company iosBio (formerly known as Stabilitech), but no news on its trials.

I'm not sure why the overly cautious would go for oral vaccines rather than a jab, as surely they'd have the same issues (and anti-vaxxer pricks will still have their conspiracy theories). However the advantages over jabs are enormous - no trained healthcare workers required to physically administer the vaccine. Easier distribution of a stable product - in the post!!

Good for trypanophobes too!
 
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acatweasel

Well-known Member
Surely this is a good option for schools or those who dislike needles


any thoughts?
Even if it works, which it probably won’t, it doesn’t create immunity. Not helpful and not an alternative that can stop the virus.
 

Mevlock

Well-known Member
Even if it works, which it probably won’t, it doesn’t create immunity. Not helpful and not an alternative that can stop the virus.

Why wouldn't it work?

The science behind it is pretty solid as far as I know.

And it's ideal as a way of helping prevent infection. Think of it more as an additional layer of protection.

For instance I use Taffix when at work, we can't really social distance and mask are pretty useless given we work in a small space for a prolonged period.

So anything that brings down the risk of infection is great.

While vaccines are rolled out preventative measures such as this, since viruses are mostly picked up through the mucous membranes could massively help bring down infectious rates.

This isn't junk science lots of evidence and studies are pointing to them working pretty well.

EDIT: to add there are a number of robust studies on going in Europe that are due to end soon that the press would probably take more seriously.

Remember not everyone can work from home, millions have to get out there each day and risk infection. An extra layer of protection could make a big difference.
 
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krish

Distinguished Member
Good innovation and business opportunity, though it's only a time-limited regular use spray, OTC, not a longer term single/double dose vaccine.

Think of it like a 48-hr deodorant spray (or decovidant spray).

Certainly not a vaccine replacement in schools as suggested.
 

Mevlock

Well-known Member
Good innovation and business opportunity, though it's only a time-limited regular use spray, OTC, not a longer term single/double dose vaccine.

Think of it like a 48-hr deodorant spray (or decovidant spray).

Certainly not a vaccine replacement in schools as suggested.

I don't think the suggestion is as a replacement in schools.

But as a way to help schools get back. I mean it's going to be while before children are being vaccinated.

Pfizer has just finished enrolling children for it's under 16 trial. But we're looking at many months before that's finished and schools will be open long before then.

I'm not sure it's practical to have every school child walk around spraying something up their nose every few hours.

But yes as an additional preventative measure I think it has great potential.
 

acatweasel

Well-known Member
Why wouldn't it work?

The science behind it is pretty solid as far as I know.

And it's ideal as a way of helping prevent infection. Think of it more as an additional layer of protection.

For instance I use Taffix when at work, we can't really social distance and mask are pretty useless given we work in a small space for a prolonged period.

So anything that brings down the risk of infection is great.

While vaccines are rolled out preventative measures such as this, since viruses are mostly picked up through the mucous membranes could massively help bring down infectious rates.

This isn't junk science lots of evidence and studies are pointing to them working pretty well.

EDIT: to add there are a number of robust studies on going in Europe that are due to end soon that the press would probably take more seriously.

Remember not everyone can work from home, millions have to get out there each day and risk infection. An extra layer of protection could make a big difference.
Here’s the best explanation I’ve read.

More detail:

Now I could be wrong but even if the spray works, then I have to coat the inside of my nose with two polysaccharides, one of which is sticky, the other deadly to viruses. It’s being researched by chemical engineers with a background in food, and they are using gels and coating tissue cultures to show it works. No human trials, no peer reviews yet.

I don’t think you can coat the whole infective surface with a nasal spray. Besides, my wife tells me I’m a mouth breather who snores. Good luck with it, but I’m fudged.
 

SteveAWOL

Distinguished Member
Surely this is a good option for schools or those who dislike needles


any thoughts?
You would probably be better off with this...


 
D

Deleted member 849701

Guest
How safe would a tablet be would people still have reactions or is it safer than a jab as it can be taken at home?
 

Trollslayer

Distinguished Member
I would expect it would be subject to the same safety standards.
The efficacy might be another question.
 

JimmyMac

Distinguished Member
How safe would a tablet be would people still have reactions or is it safer than a jab as it can be taken at home?

What is it that makes you question the safety of injections?

Injectables are produced under sterile manufacturing environments, the precautions made to ensure sterility are extremely stringent and robust.
 

IronGiant

Moderator
I think he is concerned about either:
a) the mild symptoms some report and the extremely rare incidences of allergic reaction
or b) mixing with the general public at a mass vaccination centre
or possibly both.
 

krish

Distinguished Member
Shocked no Queen's Birthday/New Year honours awarded to our leading vaccine scientists.

Should have been made Professor Dame Sarah Gilbert last year!! An immediate honour like that awarded Captain Tom.
 

SteveAWOL

Distinguished Member
Shocked no Queen's Birthday/New Year honours awarded to our leading vaccine scientists.

Should have been made Professor Dame Sarah Gilbert last year!! An immediate honour like that awarded Captain Tom.

Surely won’t be the last honour bestowed upon professor Gilbert...

 

Autopilot

Distinguished Member
Some how I’ve missed this news about a potential vaccine tablet. How promising does it look? If viable it would be a complete game changer. Are there any other vaccines delivered via a tablet, or would this be a first?
 

acatweasel

Well-known Member
Well how about this. The Sabin polio vaccine (one of the first) was given on sugar cubes!!

It was a weakened live strain and one of the side benefits was thought to be immune people poo’d out the weakened strain and if you were unlucky enough eat it :)eek::eek:), then it was possible to catch immunity.

Polio transferred intestinally, so the inoculation was following the same route. Not quite so easy for respiratory tract viruses.

How‘s that for “Crap fact of the week”?
 

acatweasel

Well-known Member
Had a slightly longer look for vaccines you can eat. List below from the USA. Most of them are attenuated viruses of pathogens that enter via the guts anyway. They are therefore adapted to get through a very acidic stomach.

For respiratory viruses, maybe a nebuliser? Breath ‘em in. BBC article below.


 

tapzilla2k

Distinguished Member
Even if it works, which it probably won’t, it doesn’t create immunity. Not helpful and not an alternative that can stop the virus.

It's a short term option to stop COVID-19 from binding to ACE2 receptors in the nasal passages. It should be a useful tool to mitigate infection risks while you wait for a vaccination.
 

SteveAWOL

Distinguished Member
Well how about this. The Sabin polio vaccine (one of the first) was given on sugar cubes!!

It was a weakened live strain and one of the side benefits was thought to be immune people poo’d out the weakened strain and if you were unlucky enough eat it :)eek::eek:), then it was possible to catch immunity.

Polio transferred intestinally, so the inoculation was following the same route. Not quite so easy for respiratory tract viruses.

How‘s that for “Crap fact of the week”?

Well hopefully China opts for sugar cubes rather than suppositories to deliver their 2nd generation coronavirus vaccines then 💩


 

acatweasel

Well-known Member
Well hopefully China opts for sugar cubes rather than suppositories to deliver their 2nd generation coronavirus vaccines then 💩


Sat with wifeynurse here, and when she was required to administer a suppository, she would usually turn up with a kidney dish, smile and say “For all the good these are, you may as well stick ‘em up your a**e“.
Apparently it usually got a laugh. :Do_O:D
 

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