Synology NAS died - FIXED

Will I Aint

Active Member
I found that my 2017 DS1515+ was getting improper shutdowns over the last few days. I had installed more compatible RAM back in 2017 and it's been rock solid since then.

I installed the desktop app Synology Assistant and ran three back to back memory checks each lasting around 4.5 hours so no problem there.

Next I unchecked the "startup after power failure" checkbox and left it overnight. This morning, the box was powered off and the power button was unresponsive, no lights or any signs of life. Seeing as I've got 5 8tb drives installed i'm not too happy as that is pretty much my entire media library.

Hunting around on the web it looks like there are a couple of issues with the DS1515+ including the atom chip issue and resistor failure related to the power button.

Following the vid instructions the I bridged a resistor on the mobo with my multimeter and the fans spun up and the lights were working so it looks like I'm going to be able to fix this.

Just interested if anyone else has had the same/similar issue plus I'll share what happens, parts are ordered but i need a soldering iron with a micro head so waiting on that to arrive.
 
Just FYI, I think you can move your all HDD into another compatible Synology unit if you have to (if you can't make that work). If I'm reading the following article right, the DS1515+ (plus) is supported for this (but NOT the DS1515)

Scroll the page down to the "HDD migration" part where there's a table:


Edit: ack, after reading the steps required, even if it's supported, they still want you to do stuff on the "alive" source NAS first, which you don't have. It doesn't look like this will work, sorry

Edit again-ok, there is hope if you have to do this: You'd need to get the same model NAS (working DS1515+), stick a temporary SATA disk in, boot it up, and make sure the new unit has the same or newer DSM than the old unit. If not sure, just install the latest. After that, shut it off, then insert your disks over in the same order they were in the old unit.
 
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Will I Aint

Active Member
Thanks, I've no problem migrating the disks if I need to but appreciate the help. I migrated my DS213j 8tb disks to my 5 bay in the same way before extending the volume. It's just frustrating that these devices are flaky and although they extended the 3 year warranty by a year, I'm still outside the window.

The DS213J is still going strong after 9 years of constant use.
 

Will I Aint

Active Member
Here's the NAS with the cover off, ready to label the drives when they come out. The problem seems to be with a transistor just to the left of the cables attached to the motherboard at the front of the case. At the moment the unit is dead, no power and the power button does nothing.
NAS1.jpg


Here's a close up of the Q2 transistor which from the online videos is a BC847 Transistor. When I bridge the 2 points marked in red with the powered on multimeter the lights come on and the fans spin up. So it would appear that this transistor is degraded and cutting power to the unit. I could solder a bridge there but it would leave the power button redundant and the unit would always be powered on.
NAS2.jpg


Parts have been ordered and I'll post an update when i start taking this all apart. I've need to completely remove the mobo from the unit to apply the fix. There is another issue with the Intel Atom processor that can be fixed by attaching a 100 Ohm resistor elsewhere on the board and I'll probably do that at the same time so that issue doesn't crop up as well.
 
Dang. We've got several enterprise Synology units here at my work, and I've had a few NAS units at home for over 15 years made by someone most people have never heard of (Thecus) to store my rips. Never had any problems with any of them except a fan went out on one of the home units (easily replaced).

I've read complaints about shoddy PSU units in Synology NAS but didn't get more info until now, googling. Seems like the whole atom series has issues, not restricted to the atom bug.
 

Will I Aint

Active Member
eh, just think of a transistor as an electronic switch. One terminal (base) gets a small amount of current from either positive or negative (depend on which type of transistor, PNP or NPN, but there are others) to switch it "on" at the base, which allows a LARGE amount of the opposite current (negative or positive) through the collector to the emitter.

Certain transistors do this in proportion, send an audio signal to the base, put power at the collector, and your speakers at the emitter. You just made an amplifier :)
 

brunation

Well-known Member

Will I Aint

Active Member
OK, all my bits have arrived so ready to make a start. In order to remove the motherboard you need to remove the back of the case. Although most of the screws are standard sizes the two in the pic below are PZ1 and come out only with the right size head. I've got a electronic screwdriver head set for working on a phone but good to know in case you need to take the back off or change fans.

Edit: after putting back together, all the black case screws are PZ1 not just the 2 above the fans.
NAS3.jpg
 
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Will I Aint

Active Member
With the back off the motherboard is free to come out as the back is also the faceplate for RJ45 and USB connectors. The fan connectors onto the esata board are easy to remove, the connector on the right of the esata which attaches to the motherboard with the arrow pointing to it is a real pain to undo.

NAS4.jpg


Motherboard now removed, just retained with 6 screws on the mounting posts. I had to undo those first to manoeuvre the board into a better position to remove the awkard esata board connector.

NAS5.jpg
 

Will I Aint

Active Member
Here's a close up of the offending transistor, I've never done micro soldering let alone SMDs (Surface Mounted Devices) where instead of wires protruding through holes the device has legs that sit on pads. This particular piece is 2mm long.

NAS6.jpg


I have some desoldering braid which i was using with a fine tip. It wasn't working or taking off a little solder and I got nowhere. A quick online search lead me to this video How to Use Chemtronics Soder-Wick.

I changed the soldering iron tip to a standard flat edge, tinned the tip and added solder to the pads to give more to draw off with the wick, worked a treat and the transistor came off. I cleaned the area with isopropyl alcohol and a cotton bud.

NAS7.jpg
 

Will I Aint

Active Member
I was using a headlamp and helping hands :)
NAS8.jpg
 

Will I Aint

Active Member
Damn, those tiny components are fiddly to position. Took a few attempts but managed to solder one leg to get the position correct. After that I soldered the other 2 and then tidied up the first one.

NAS9.jpg


Next, i soldered the 100 Ohm resister for the atom fix in case in happens and changed the battery.

NAS10.jpg


All I need to do now is put it back together and hope it works.
 

Will I Aint

Active Member
Looks promising, I need to put all the disks back in and see if it remains stable.
NAS11.jpg
 

Will I Aint

Active Member
Slotted the disks in and running smooth. Will just need to keep an eye on the logs for stability.
 

Will I Aint

Active Member
thanks guys, just for information

The BC847 NPN transistors were £1.39 for a strip of 10
The metal film resistor 0.5w 100 Ohm was £0.99
The CR1220 battery was £1.99

I did lay out for a soldering iron, tips and solder but if you have those already then it's a cheap fix but I've learned something new and would definitely do again.
 

Will I Aint

Active Member
Just a quick update, been 5 weeks since the fix and running absolutely smoothly with no issues.
 

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