Question Switching to a windows PC questions

freeman3030

Standard Member
Hi,
I'm currently an iMac user, but looking to get a PC again as my mac is very slow in playing my favorite game (Sims 4). My partner has a Windows laptop and I use it to play, Roller Coaster Tycoon World and Transport Fever. But, like my Mac when the maps start getting full, it starts to get a bit jittery and slow to play.

My iMac is 6 years old and I used a 4 bay Drobo to store all of my photos and documents and only use the mac HDD for Apps/Games etc. In my mind, this keeps it running as good as it can as its not bogged down with my iTunes library, large photo library etc. I've stopped editing photos on my iMac, because its just starting to get too slow. But that is probably hampered but the fact my photos are stored on my drobo.

When I switch back to a PC, I'd really like to go back to having everything store on the PC's HDD, but I'm not that confident with how windows backup works. I like that when a drive fails oin my drobo, it flashes and I just swap it out for another one. So I don't really know what to do for the best there.
I have thought about getting a PC with a SSD, and like how I'm using my mac, just to store software on the SSD and use an external (or even a second internal HDD) to store my documents and photos.

Computers have move on so much in the last 6 years since I last bought one, I don't really know what to do!
 

EndlessWaves

Distinguished Member
When I switch back to a PC, I'd really like to go back to having everything store on the PC's HDD, but I'm not that confident with how windows backup works. I like that when a drive fails oin my drobo, it flashes and I just swap it out for another one.

That's not a backup system you're talking about on the Drobo. It's mainly designed to save you downtime when a drive fails and won't protect against accidentally deleted files, corruption, malware, theft, the house burning down or any one of a thousand and one other disasters.

That setup is generally known as RAID and you can set it up on a Windows computer if you want ('storage spaces'), although it rarely makes economic sense in a home perspective. It's more often used in businesses where the money lost from data being unavailable while you restore from backup due to drive failure outweighs the cost of the second drive.

The built-in windows backup program, called File History, is similar to Apple's time machine in functionality.

I have thought about getting a PC with a SSD, and like how I'm using my mac, just to store software on the SSD and use an external (or even a second internal HDD) to store my documents and photos.

Unless you're on a really tight budget I wouldn't even consider getting a computer without at least a small SSD (240GB+) for the operating system and program.

Whether you go for a huge SSD, an additional internal hard drive or a network drive (NAS) really depends on your budget and requirements.

The only reason in going for normal external storage I can think of is if it's easier to arrange in your workspace with a smaller PC.
 

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