SVHS to DVD // Separates or Combi?

Discussion in 'Blu-ray & DVD Players & Recorders' started by spannersuk, Jul 28, 2005.

  1. spannersuk

    spannersuk
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    I know this question has been asked in 2003 & 2004 but I was wondering if the answer has changed at in 2005.
    I have a library of SVHS tapes that I would like to get onto DVD at the highest quality I can. Having read Rasczaks “Which DVD” article (great info for the first time buyer BTW – many thanks Rasczaks!) which says <<With a standalone you can get interference or colour bleed which may require an external picture stabiliser/enhancer. With an all-in-one this is not an issue. Thirdly some of the better combis - namely the JVC DR-MV1 (DVDR/VCR combi) or Panasonic DMR-ES30V - have extensive picture processing aimed at maximising VHS quality on a DVDR>> So my question is, as I have Good SVHS tape decks (a JVC & a Panny) would I get better quality with a separate DVD & HDD player, such as a PANASONIC DMR-EH50 or TOSHIBA RDXS34 or would I get better end results with a VHS DVD HDD Combi (is there a SVHS DVD HDD combi!) ?
    Which route would people recommend?
    This may put a spanner in the works, but one feature I do like the sound of with DVD & HDD systems is the ability to always record what you are watching so if you miss something you can go back and look at it again so if any of these have that feature that would be great.

    Many thanks, Spanners
     
  2. Rasczak

    Rasczak
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    If you've got a decent VCR then go for the seperates option, i.e. get yourself a standalone DVDR or HDD/DVDR combi. For one thing there is no point buying something you already have and are happy with. Secondly the VCRs included in the DVDRs are not SVHS (although they do playback SVHS tapes). But more importantly, if your VCR's heads are slightly out of alignment (which can frequently happen) then any of your recordings will look best on your VCR.

    This feature is only currently found on Philips and JVC DVD recorders. Avoid the former for a whole host of reasons (especially if you want to archive off VHS) and the latter you need to select carefully as, until this year, their models have not supported RGB input. The new JVC HDD/DVDR combi that supports RGB input is (off the top of my head) the DR-MH600. Not sure if the 300 model does or not yet. Either way I don't think either are shipping yet - should be early September.
     
  3. Steve N

    Steve N
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    I was looking at this for the same reasons as you.
    I came to the conclusion that the separates solution was the way to go.
    Firstly because reviews of the combi machines seemed to always come down on the side of the separates.
    Secondly because I prefered the flexibility of the 2 box system.
    I have the JVC 9500 SVHS Video which has the dynamic drum feature which gives jitter and noise free slo mo/fast mo in forward and reverse. Its' just so easy to pause the DVD recorder before adding another clip or switching the tapes etc.
    I also think there is something in the argument about getting better performance using seperate dedicated technologies. For example - it is widely accepted that seperate power amps and processors give better performance than integrated amps.
    Also on the flexibility side, what if you find you need a bigger HD, You would then have to buy another DVD HD recorder anyway rather than just trading up.
    Another downside to the combi is, in my experience, tapes tend to play back better on the machines they were recorded on.

    Regarding other points you raise. 1,The Panny DVD recorders maximises the picture quality of tapes anyway. 2, I'm pretty sure there was an SVHS/DVD combi but can't remember if it had HD.
    I have been very happy with my decision. I've kept my JVC (had to, dynamic drum VCR's not made now) but am now on my 4th DVD recorder.
    In my view it's a no brainer. The only advantage of a combi IMHO is it reduces your boxes and saves space.
     
  4. spannersuk

    spannersuk
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    Thanks for the advice. Separates it is then. Now I’ve been trying to find out more about the JVC DR-MH600 & 300 – without that much luck. Seems it is a UK only model (why would they do that?) Anyroadup it looks as if I could be compromising my solution for a feature that is not as common as I first thought. Therefore another option might be if I choose a PANASONIC DMR-EH50 or TOSHIBA RDXS34 can I start recording a programme and then start watching it before its finished recording (sort of catching up with the live broadcast through the ads?) as this might be an attractive alternative. Do either of these system have this feature – if so does it have a name. Thanks
     
  5. Rasczak

    Rasczak
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    Yes. It's called 'Timeslip'. Basically whilst recording on the units HDD (or onto DVD-RAM) you can 'Timeslip' and watch any part of the programme your recording or anything else on the HDD or on DVD.
     
  6. spannersuk

    spannersuk
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    OK Time slip it is then ……. I’m naturally draw to PANASONIC DMR-EH50 rather than the TOSHIBA RDXS34 as my PC has a noisy fan and that drives me nuts but the Panasonic only has an 80GB hard disk (I'm going to back to back them in a shop tomorrow). However do you think it should it be a relatively easy job to upgrade the Panny disk to 160GB where its out of warranty or would you wait for a 120GB - 160GB official version. Do all 160GB units have to have a fan?
     
  7. Rasczak

    Rasczak
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    The Panasonic DVD recorders, like most brands, will prevent you from changing the HDD for one with a bigger capacity (you can put a bigger HDD in but only the first 80GB will be recognised!). The only recorders that have been successfully upgraded are an 'ancient' 2003 Pioneer model and (it seems) a current LG model.

    Panasonic will be releasing the Freeview equipped EH60D with a 200GB HDD in the next five weeks or so.
     

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