Sunset

Liquid101

Distinguished Member
Sunsets are very difficult to capture well - especially when you want large areas of foreground.

The light meter is often fooled by the large dynamic range in the scene and tries to capture as much detail as possible. Exposing for the bright areas of the sky will send most of the scene to black (what yours did) - exposing for the foreground will blow the sky out to white.

You have a few options to control this. The first is to wait until the sun has actually dissappeared over the horizon. You'll still get all the colours, but the scene will be much more controlable. This is my prefered method - but you need to get the timing just right.

You could use a graduated ND filter to control the brighter sky areas while exposing for the foreground. However, you'll have a failry limited range of compositions.

You could make several exposures to extend the dynamic range - One for highlights, one for mids and one for shadows, then combine them in photoshop. You'll need to use a tripod to make the layering easier, but you can get very dramtic results this way.
 

Paranormalist

Distinguished Member
Sunsets are very difficult to capture well - especially when you want large areas of foreground.

The light meter is often fooled by the large dynamic range in the scene and tries to capture as much detail as possible. Exposing for the bright areas of the sky will send most of the scene to black (what yours did) - exposing for the foreground will blow the sky out to white.

You have a few options to control this. The first is to wait until the sun has actually dissappeared over the horizon. You'll still get all the colours, but the scene will be much more controlable. This is my prefered method - but you need to get the timing just right.

You could use a graduated ND filter to control the brighter sky areas while exposing for the foreground. However, you'll have a failry limited range of compositions.

You could make several exposures to extend the dynamic range - One for highlights, one for mids and one for shadows, then combine them in photoshop. You'll need to use a tripod to make the layering easier, but you can get very dramtic results this way.

Cheers, Liquid. I may give option one a go next time. :oops:
 

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