1. Join Now

    AVForums.com uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Subwoofers & room size

Discussion in 'Subwoofers' started by vjcinemas, Jul 6, 2004.

  1. vjcinemas

    vjcinemas
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    Hi, I am told bookshelf speakers can be better in smallish rooms compared to floorstanders as the bass can get boomy. What about subwoofers? is there a point at which spending more money on a more powerful sub is detrimental due to room size. My room is 16ft x 10ft. I am considering a setup consisting of Arcam AV300 quad 12L & L-centre.

    Thanks.
     
  2. shodan

    shodan
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2001
    Messages:
    10,190
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    shoeburyness
    Ratings:
    +4,528
    Hey, I think that is quite a good question! Come on then folks, waddya fink?
     
  3. Ian J

    Ian J
    Banned

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2001
    Messages:
    25,528
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Ratings:
    +4,906

    The "power" of a subwoofer is connected to it's design and a large subwoofer needs less "power" than a compact design to drive it to the same volume levels.

    There are a few people here using "powerful" subwoofers in garage conversions if that is any help and whilst a more powerful sub will not be detrimental in a small room it could well be a waste of money.
     
  4. vjcinemas

    vjcinemas
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    Thanks Ian, but would a 16ft x 10ft room be considered small?

    Would a Rel Q400 or B&W asw750 be a waste in this room?
     
  5. Ian J

    Ian J
    Banned

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2001
    Messages:
    25,528
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Ratings:
    +4,906
    16ft X 10ft is on the small size. Personally I would consider a REL Q400 to be a waste (of money) in any room but whether or not the B&W is overkill depends on how you want to use the sub.

    The B&W will give you high quality, low distortion bass and is easily capable of pressurising the room to reference levels but if you live in a terraced house with thin walls and have young children that wake up easily you may want to consider something cheaper as you won't be able to use it to it's potential.

    In those circumstances perhaps the B&W ASW675 may be more appropriate
     
  6. Nimby

    Nimby
    Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2004
    Messages:
    9,201
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    136
    Location:
    The Danish Bacon Factory
    Ratings:
    +669
    I was hoping to avoid responding to this one: :)

    I can relate to the idea of using bookshelves instead of floorstanders in a small room. Particularly using infininite baffle (closed box) bookshelf speakers with their limited bass and (hopefully) smoothly falling response curve. :smashin:

    The problem with using a subwoofer in the same situation is no different from the loudspeakers. The frequency of room resonances is directly related to the distance between the boundary walls & between the floor and ceiling.

    A small room will likely excite resonces well within normal music and film audio frequency ranges. A bass guitar will go down to 40Hz and that is well within the boom range of small rooms. :thumbsdow

    Some rooms boom so badly you can only listen to headphones in them! :blush:

    Other rooms suck the bass out of anything you put in there. The ratio of distance between the opposing walls & the floor and ceiling are critical. A cube is worst of course as all the resonances overlap to produce an awful boom. :(

    It really comes down to actual room dimensions and how "tightly" controlled the subwoofer's output is. A smooth response and low distortion will help. A high quality closed box would be the obvious option in a difficult, smaller room. If only from a furnishing point of view. Ported boxes do have a reputation for being boomier than closed boxes. Whether this is deserved probably depends more on the room and the actual subwoofer.
    Cheaper boxes might try to put out a peak near the lower end of their response to make it sound as if they've got some balls. When in fact it's "one note bass". Car audio subwoofers tend to sound like this. You'be heard one boom, you've heard them all! :D

    The worst of all possible worlds would be a small boomy room with a small, poorly made sub box with a lumpy response with a large peak (or peaks) which coincide exacty with the room resonances. :mad:

    Nimby
     

Share This Page

Loading...