Subwoofer problems

Discussion in 'AV Receivers & Amplifiers' started by Sheepdisease, Feb 10, 2009.

  1. Sheepdisease

    Sheepdisease
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    Set-up:



    • Squeezebox Duet £214.00 For streaming music from my PC to the amplifier
    • Yamaha AX863SE £550 including 5m of QED micro cable with airlock plugs, a 5m sub cable and an HDMI cable, Black Mission Floorstanders and a NAD Tuner
    • Tannoy SFX 5.1 Speaker System £146.76 Perfect companions to the Yamaha AX863SE
    • 2 x Tannoy SFX 5.1 Speaker Stands Black Pair £87.98 Specifically designed for the speakers purchased
    • Panasonic DMP-BD35EB-K Profile 2 Blu-ray Disc Player with BD Live £177.14 Plays Blueray discs and upscales CD and DVD to 1080p
    • 2 x 1.8M HDMI to HDMI Cable £7.92 Gold Connectors - For Use With HD TV's / Xbox 360 / PS3 etc


    Right, I've got it all hooked up and working (TV, Blueray player, amp and speakers).

    Still to get:

    Squeezebox working
    Subwoofer working

    The squeezebox shouldn't be a problem once the internet is sorted.

    However, I had real problems trying to get the subwoofer working. I connected it to the sub out on the amp using a subwoofer av cable. The cable had arrows on it so I tried connecting it both ways to the amp and subwoofer, with no result. I tried changing the dials with no difference. Tried to change the voltage using the red square switch from 230v to 115v, this I am guessing blew the fuse inside the amp. The ON/OFF LED went bright for a second then went out. Since, I have tried using a difference power cable with no luck.

    On the back it says "100-120v~/50-60Hz [FUSE: T1.6AL/250V]" and underneathe "220-240V~/50-60Hz [FUSE: T800mAL/250V]".

    What should I do apart from seek medical advice for being so dumb?

    Please tell me first what I should do to fix the sub and then what I need to do to get it working alongside all the other speakers, that I must not have been doing right in the first place.

    Thank you so much.
     
  2. limegreenzx

    limegreenzx
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    First of all put the switch back to 230V. Then buy a couple of T800Ma/250V fuses from Maplins or similar. T800Ma are slow blow fuses.

    Replace the fuse. Pray, plug in and switch on and pray again that you get the power LED to stay on and the fuse doesn't blow again.
     
  3. Sheepdisease

    Sheepdisease
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    Thank you for your help!

    In order to replace the fuse I am going to have to unscrew the subwoofer casing, right?
     
  4. limegreenzx

    limegreenzx
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    I don't know your sub. But you will often find that the fuse holder is part of the mains input socket.

    Depending on how honest you feel, I would be inclined to set the switch back to 230V and return the sub as faulty.
     
  5. Sheepdisease

    Sheepdisease
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    The sub:

    SFX5.1 Subwoofer PERFORMANCE
    Power output 100 Watts
    Frequency response (-6dB) 45Hz - 140Hz Driver 200mm (8.00”) paper cone Inputs 140Hz - 78kHz
    Drivers Twin line or speaker level
    Power requirements 160VA max
    Fuse ratings AC100-120V / 60Hz - Fuse: T1.6A L /250V
    AC 220-240V / 50Hz - Fuse: T800mA L /250V
    Additional features ON / OFF/ AUTO power function Weight 9.0kg (20.0lbs)
    Dimensions H x W x D 345 x 250 x 370 mm (13.58 x 9.84 x 14.57”)
    Finish Silver or black

    That idea did cross my mind, but it will cost a fair bit to ship a bass back to the company due to weight.
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2009
  6. SwampieUK

    SwampieUK
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    Putting 240v into a 115v device (which it becomes when you switch it to 115v) is baaaaaad. Without knowing the actual design of the PSU, you may have just blown the fuse - however, there's a reason that manufacturers say in their documentation things like:

    "The voltage to be used must be the same as that specified on
    the rear panel. Using this unit with a higher voltage than
    specified is dangerous and may cause fire, damage to this unit,
    and/or personal injury. YAMAHA will not be held responsible for
    any damage resulting from use of this unit with a voltage other
    than specified." (taken from Yamaha NS-P110 user manual)

    Put it this way (very simplistic!) - the device requires a certain internal voltage to run - lets say 12v DC? In 240v mode, the PSU outputs 12v (20:1 conversion to DC, 1/20 of the voltage). In 120v mode it still needs to output 12v - so this would be a 10:1 conversion to DC. This is what the switch effectively does.

    Now, putting 240v into a 120v mode, would still convert 10:1 (1/10 of the voltage), but rather than output 12v, it's outputting 24v (1/10 of 240v). This is may be massively outside many components acceptable voltage range, possibly causing components to blow. (And release the much fabled, magic smoke.)

    Now, the PSU will have a fuse on it to avoid excessive current - but that doesn't mean the PSU didn't output 24v for a brief period of time. The fuse is probably there to protect the PSU from burnout - not from excessive input voltages.

    Check the fuse - it may not have blown. But if it has, and replacing it doesn't solve the problem, you may have an expensive repair/replacement on your hands.
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2009
  7. Sheepdisease

    Sheepdisease
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    Thank you for all your support.

    I went to Maplin and got a pack of ten fuses, installed one and it worked. Then tinkered a bit more with the cabling and now everything is working perfectly.

    Unfortunatelly, the instruction booklet that comes with the Tannoy speakers is terrible and a waste of the paper that it comes on. It provides no real installlation information or information regarding the difference voltage settings.
     
  8. SwampieUK

    SwampieUK
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    Excellent - I'm glad the fuse protected everything - good design on Tannoy's part.

    With regard to the voltage settings - whilst manufacturers tend to put warnings in their documentation about setting it correctly - the principle is pretty straightforward - set to it to whatever voltage your supply is. eg UK = 220-240v, US = 110-120v. With regard to Yamaha products I believe, they don't even put the switch into their UK or US models - probably to avoid mistakes.
     

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