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Subwoofer problemo

Discussion in 'Subwoofers' started by Frankeh, Sep 11, 2005.

  1. Frankeh

    Frankeh
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    Hi lads, I have this problem I always had, I think.. but it's getting on my nerves..

    I have the Logitech Z-680 set, I put the volume for my subwoofer pretty low.. because of this problem. (volume: 2/3 out of 10)
    This problem especially occurs when I play games.. the bass doesn't sound "purified" and it gives a specific noise I can't describe.. it's like "dzzzzz" on some moments, not whole the time

    when I look a movie on DVD or listen to music, it happens rarely... so the question is: is this a well known problem with video games? or is there something with my subwoofer?
     
  2. fire boy

    fire boy
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    It may be that the sub has trouble outputting certain frequencies.

    i.e A certain point in a film there is a explosion and you here it.

    I had trouble with a speaker like that and tried my test disc and found that it buzzed at a certain frequency and had it replaced under wty.

    My advice is to run a test using a DVE test dvd to see if o.k

    You may even be able to download something off the net.

    Hope this helps
     
  3. Nimby

    Nimby
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  4. Frankeh

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    so what do I have to do? listen to all those frequencies and listen if it can put it into a sound or what? sorry but I'm a huge noob if it comes to audio
     
  5. Mr Incredible

    Mr Incredible
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    Nimby, the files on this web page are MP3 files. As I am unable to use a PC near the AV kit, I want to burn an Audio CD from the MP3 files. On burning there is an option to ""Normalize all audio files" Y/N

    Should I normalise the the files or leave them un-normalised?

    :thumbsup:
     
  6. Nimby

    Nimby
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    My understanding of "normalise" is that it means to make all files the same standard volume. Which would seem to be very desirable for sound level testing across a range of frequencies using an SPL meter.

    I saved all the files onto my computer and then used Windoze Media Player to play them in descending order of frequency as if they were tracks on an album. (You'll have to make an album first)

    This was just to save having to cue every track and then run backwards and forwards between the SPL meter and the computer. I just scribbled the meter readings against frequency down on paper and then drew a response graph on standard graph paper. I preferred this method of working because I could read the frequency right off the computer screen from the matching file name.

    If anybody knows any different I'd be grateful for a better definition of "normalise" or a better method of working with these sound files.

    I readily admit that I haven't read the Snapbug instructions through as I don't use a BFD.

    I believe there is even an automatic graphing system if you plug your SPL meter into your computer. But I haven't played with that at all.

    You can easily buy very long phono leads to join your computer to your AV system. (I use a 10 meter cable for testing)

    You can test a subwoofer alone using a phono lead direct from the computer to your low level phono input on your sub. But you can't test your sub together with your speakers for a combined output response this way. Watch the volume and keep test tones short to avoid overheating the driver.

    Remember to place your test meter at your normal seating position or the results are worthless for an in-room response graph. If you just want to play you can place your SPL meter near the sub for a near-field response. But the room will modify what you get quite dramatically as you move further away. So a near-field response curve is largely of academic interest.

    Frankeh only wanted to see where his sub buzzed on the frequency scale so there's no need to get too sophisticated with your tests. Just don't play your sub too loudly and possibly damage it. Sometimes it is things in the room which rattle or buzz rather than the sub. So keep an open mind.

    Nimby
     
  7. Mr Incredible

    Mr Incredible
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    As my computer is in my studio which is 3 rooms, 20m and 4 doors away from my lounge, a connection to a PC is out of the question!! I have a laptop computer but it doesn't have any phono outputs, and I wouldn't trust the headphone socket either.

    I'm sure all the mp3's were recorded at the same level, so I don't think normalising would make any difference. The only thing I would suggest tis that without normalising the recorded level may be correct to get the correct reference levels. But as there is no indication of what levels the files were recorded at (Avia is at 85 dB) there is no way to know what level you should be calibrating to compared to the mains and surrounds. Perhaps the files should be used just to get a broad frequency plot to see where the peaks are etc, but then use a reference source to calibrate levels. Dunno really, straws & grasping come to mind.
     
  8. Frankeh

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    so I need to put them in a playlist and listen to all of the sounds and check which one makes the specfic weird sound I've been talking of? about an item in the room that makes my subwoofer buzz.. I've thinked of that too, but I don't know what... can you give me examples of things that could make the buzzing?
     
  9. Frankeh

    Frankeh
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    anyone?
     
  10. Nimby

    Nimby
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    You'll know when you find them. They'll be buzzing or rattling. :devil:

    Nimby
     

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