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Subletting a flat

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by Tom Whitaker, Jun 11, 2005.

  1. Tom Whitaker

    Tom Whitaker
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    Hi all,

    Been speaking to a friend who rented a one-bed flat, used the (large) living room as a 'studio flat' type setup and subletted the other double bedroom to someone through Loot, with them sharing the kitchen and bathroom but otherwise leading a reasonably seperate existence.

    Just wondering if anyone had done or heard of this kind of thing before? Financially and logistically, it would REALLY suit me right now!

    Obviously it's down to the individual landlord, but is there something I'm forgetting here, or is it not unreasonable to suggest that if I was guaranteeing I could cover the rent/deposit/bills for the whole place for a year (which I could afford, I'd just rather not!), that I could be pretty much free to do as I please with the 'spare' room, as long as I was responsible for any damage etc? (To this end, I'd take a deposit from the person renting the room).

    Any general thoughts?
     
  2. Miyazaki

    Miyazaki
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    have you considered factors such as tv license, council tax, fire escape route?

    The landlord might end up charging double for the flat if they thought you were subletting.
     
  3. Henry

    Henry
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    I'm not familiar with residential leases but on commercial property ones, you would normally be permitted to sub-let but not a a rent that exceeds the one that you are currently paying the landlord. If you did so, the extra rent would be payable to the landlord.

    The most important thing to do is check your lease carefully to see what provisions it contains.
     
  4. Astaroth

    Astaroth
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    Certainly in all the properties I have rented there has been conditions in the contract that I must not sub-let or have people staying in the property who pays me for it.

    1 would be to check your own lease

    2 consider how likely you are to be caught

    3 consider how your landlord would react - I have had some landlords that wouldnt care as long as their rent was being paid and others which would have immediately voided the contract
     
  5. SanPedro

    SanPedro
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    If it's not in your lease agreement then assume you'd be free to do as you pleased. That's what lease agreements are for.

    I doubt if most landlords would have a clause allowing subletting. Most shared houses are usually let for a higher total rent than if occupied by one person alone.

    CL
     

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