Subjective opinio room eq

rccarguy2

Member
What are people's experiences in determining whether you prefer room eq disabled or enabled? We can see before and after, with say the best room eq out there either flat or house curve, built in rta, rew etc

But it may be possible you prefer the speakers in pure mode? If you don't know if the room eq is enabled or not, whether relied on auto, auto made it worse (or adjusting badly inaccurate meter)

Also depends in whether the unit downsamples to 48khz..also whether you've capped the frequency to 300hz. Or maybe just prefer sub eq'd. Or it's a crappy bundled eq.

Or acoustic panels do enough, or even make it worse, then room eq attempts to correct that.
 

ShanePJ

Well-known Member
AVForums Sponsor
I really feel this is down to personal taste and there is not one option which claims to be best. The reason for this is people enjoy different things when it comes to audio. Some enjoy the nuances that the room or speakers delivers whereas others enjoy how those nuances being removed meaning that there is only one person who can decide whether or not it right for them and that's the person who enjoys what's happening once the room eq has been carried out.

Can I ask where you feel you are missing something as looking at your toys, you have some great products, but obviously, something is missing and it seems you are not gelling with them
 

rccarguy2

Member
I'm happy with my kit,.the issue I have is room eq adds multiple variables into the mix

In a two channel system you have no tone controls, you either like it or don't. You can add acoustic panels to tame brightness but the lack of eq variables gives less scope on altering the sound

But with room eq it may do a good job down low, or room eq is too aggressive, you may like the speaker house sound it may screw up mid/HF, or you could fiddle with it not knowing what you're doing and make it worse, or having a cheap mass produced non calibrated mic (say with any AVR) means the correction values are out
 

ashenfie

Well-known Member
It think will personal taste does come into it, it rather depends on your room and how much effort you spend fixing the room. The best solution is to fix the room and in most case this some bass control is needed.
 

ShanePJ

Well-known Member
AVForums Sponsor
So many things which are true, but if you are after something which is acoustically correct, I think the question is what’s acoustically correct. No room or eq system will right a wrong if the listener feels they are missing something or find that what they were hoping would be removed isn’t achievable

I feel, the answer still stands with listener and if they feel it’s feel it is wrong, they need to do something about it

Each audio equipment has its own characteristics and in most rooms that will shine through, but not always and they need to change something whether it be the room layout, listening position or even the components
 

rccarguy2

Member
So many things which are true, but if you are after something which is acoustically correct, I think the question is what’s acoustically correct. No room or eq system will right a wrong if the listener feels they are missing something or find that what they were hoping would be removed isn’t achievable

I feel, the answer still stands with listener and if they feel it’s feel it is wrong, they need to do something about it

Each audio equipment has its own characteristics and in most rooms that will shine through, but not always and they need to change something whether it be the room layout, listening position or even the components

The issue could be that having room eq could be trying to wrong a right. Say if the room is perfect as it is in pure two channel system with analogue pre amp, you place a avr and for various reasons room eq messes it up.
 

ShanePJ

Well-known Member
AVForums Sponsor
The issue could be that having room eq could be trying to wrong a right. Say if the room is perfect as it is in pure two channel system with analogue pre amp, you place a avr and for various reasons room eq messes it up.
All I can say is why would you not just run the system without the room eq engaged if its right? As the listener, each and everyone of us is in charge, not the toys. If it gets it wrong, who cares if you can disengage it
 
Last edited:

Gasp3621

Distinguished Member
Lot of this has been studied and i don´t think it´s up for debate.

One should at least correct below room transit frequency (~250-300hz) speakers and subwoofers. Below the transition frequency, the measured response is mostly determined by the room. Above, the speakers mostly determine the response. Room acoustic products are less effective here so it would make sense to use some form of room eq.

Audussey with app and new Yamaha Aventages (A4A - A8A) has these options now aswell as Dirac and ARC, so no need to run full range correction which may end up messing the sound. However you can`t really mess up the sound if you clean up the bass frequencies as bass in general has large importance what we hear and cleaning that means it affects positively to mids and highs aswell. If you have chosen your speakers due to certain tonality and then go correct that with X target curve, it may be lost. Better to start from the bottom first.


" To the left of transition frequency it says the room has the largest impact. Massive frequency response variations exist due to so called “room modes.” You can change your speaker all you want and you will still get massive peaks and valleys as shown. "

index.php
 

The latest video from AVForums

Podcast: Panasonic JZ2000 Final Thoughts - TV Calibration: Should you? And More...
Subscribe to our YouTube channel
Support AVForums with Patreon

Top Bottom