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Strange Reaction Post Long Runs

Gingerbeard

Active Member
Hi Guys

Just wondering if any of you have experienced the following or may know what might be causing it to happen as it’s a little concerning...

...Every time I undertake or participate in a long run I get this reaction: lips go blue’ish, I go white as a ghost, clammy, have to deficate, then be sick (several times) and then need to sleep for about 4 hours, after which I feel okay again and can eat and drink. This never occurs on shorter runs, only runs that are 12 miles and over in distance. I always try and prepare properly prior to a long run I.e. eat plenty of carbs, protein and drink lots of water. I also take water on during the run and have tried fuelling while running. The other week, after not doing a long run for quite some time I ran 14 miles and again had the same reaction but also got severe toe spasms or cramps, all very weird

I went to the doctor a while ago and he at the time thought it might be down to my core fitness, but after doing months of what he advised, shorter runs like 10k or less at various speeds and climbs, it’s still the same

I will be going back to the doctors but I can’t find anything online that relates to this. The symptoms are the same each time and in the same order. Any ideas?

ATB

Gingerbeard
 

The Dreamer

Distinguished Member
Sounds like simple overexertion. Your heart is simply unable to keep up with whatever you’re doing (in this case, long distance running), throwing up and defacating is the body’s response to being stressed - it happens a lot after a faint.

Lots of things could cause it, and I’m not a medic, so not going to guess.

I would certainly see a doctor about it though, as it is not normal.

Though it should be noted that some people push themselves this far deliberately under training - I have a mate/colleague who is ex-SAS, and he says he used to row until the symptoms you’ve described occurred, with him falling off the rowing machine. But that was deliberately pushing himself to that point as part of his own psychological training - so that if he ever needed to push himself to that limit in combat, he could basically override his brain telling his body to stop and keep going until his body literally gives up. In my world that’d be crazy - in his, it was just part of the job!

However, if you’re not reaching this point deliberately, then as I say, it’s not normal.

Again though, I’m not a medic, so no medical advice is given here.
 

shodan

Distinguished Member
You've described something I know as Blood pooling. After a long, very hard pushing exercise session the blood is largely in the limbs and when you stop the exercising the blood does not circulate fully round the system properly and so in essence "pools" in the limbs abs does not circulate ribs the brain and internal organs etc hence the drop in blood pressure, cyanosis etc.

I may have got this wrong and it may be that it returns to the stomach too quickly or something like that. I've not read up on our for a few years.
However, the fix to prevent it is a more effective cool down.

I have suffered from this twice in my life and it is horrifying and scary. The first time I thought I was on my way out and nearly called an ambulance! The second time recognised what it was, made sure I want going to puke then walked out off.
 

IronGiant

Moderator
@Gingerbeard you could have a very serious underlying metabolic or heart condition. Get back to your doctor ASAP.
 

Sonic67

Distinguished Member
...Every time I undertake or participate in a long run I get this reaction: lips go blue’ish, I go white as a ghost, clammy, have to deficate, then be sick (several times) and then need to sleep for about 4 hours, after which I feel okay again and can eat and drink.
Blue lips is known as cyanosis.

Blue skin or lips (cyanosis)

Blue skin or lips need to be checked urgently in hospital.
 

Gingerbeard

Active Member
Hi Guys, thanks for the feedback it is much appreciated. Don’t worry I’m not seeking a medical diagnosis here just thoughts from like minded individuals who have a passion for fitness :)

The male side of my family have a history of angina. My grandad died of this problem in his early sixties as it was misdiagnosed as chronic indigestion and my old man also had an angina attack in his 40’s due to extreme stress and a bad health life I.e drinking and smoking to much. I have had ECGs in the past but everything came back normal, but I am an ex smoker myself, gave up almost 20 years ago now! Perhaps there is some underlying damage from then

I will be calling my doctors today to get in and checked out

Will update when I know more

Thanks again :thumbsup:

ATB

Gingerbeard
 

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