Static IP Address for a Wireless Desktop??

Discussion in 'Networking & NAS' started by mark*w, Jan 28, 2009.

  1. mark*w

    mark*w
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    Hi,

    OK, I have a problem I used to have my desktop connected to my router via a LAN cable and had the router set to assign it a static IP address every time it was switched on.

    This meant my laptop could find the desktop everytime it was switched on, and I could use the same iTunes library.

    The problem is I've now moved my desktop away from my cable router, and installed a wireless network card in it.

    However, I can't figure out how to assign a static IP address to the desktop now, without mucking up my network connection.

    So, what are my options -

    Do some routers allow you to assign static IP addresses to wireless clients?
    Should I get a cable splitter and move my modem and router into the living room, then just hook up my desktop via an Ethernet cable?
    Or is there a way I can assign a static IP address to a wireless PC?

    Thanks

    Mark
     
  2. Gadgetcity

    Gadgetcity
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    If you can set an address to be permenantly assigned in your router then it shouldn't matter whether it is a wireless connection or not. (you just need to re-set it as you have changed a physical interface). Usually it is under DHCP and this applies to ALL router LAN/WLAN connections.

    If you really can't assign the address in your router if it is wireless (can't imagine why not) then you can set a static IP on the desktop itself.

    You don't mention what OS you are using. You rarely need a static IP address but if you are using Windows you can assign one on the PC itself as follows.

    Network Connections -> Double click on your wireless adapter -> Properties -> Internet Protocol

    Now you can click "Use the following IP address". You need to know what you router address is - probably 192.168.0.1
    (When you double click on your wireless adapter in network connections the settings are shown on the status tab)

    Pick an IP address like 192.168.0.20 for your PC (the first three digits need to match the first three of the router address)
    Set the subnet mask to 255.255.255.0
    set default gateway to your router address eg 192.168.0.1

    Set "Use the following DNS server address" -> preferred DNS to your router address eg 192.168.0.1

    If you get it wrong then don't worry - setting them back to auto IP and auto DNS will put everything back as it was.

    NOTE: I'm not sure that you actually need to do this though as you can normally address a computer locally by it's "computer name" instead of an IP address. I don't use iTunes though so I'm not sure what your underlying issue is.
    Next time posting your OS and hardware eg router make and model, might help provide a clearer solution.

    Hope that helps and good luck!
     
  3. beerhunter

    beerhunter
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    Yes they do, all of them to my knowledge, but as has been said you do not need to do it to achieve your aim. In fact, as you have found, using Fixed Addressing can cause more problems than is solves. I always counsel against it except for specific applications. The IP Address that your router is serving to your WiFi Adapter should work perfectly well. Look somewhere else for the problem.
     
  4. Alistair

    Alistair
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    If you have an 'address' reservation configured within your router, find the entry with the IP address and device name of your desktop, then simply edit the Mac address and enter the mac address entry of your wifi card. You can find this out on Windows by going to a command prompt, typing 'ipconfig /all' look through the text until you see your wifi card and simply copy/paste the mac address entry, this will most likely be the solitiom

    If you did have an

    Hope this helps.
     
  5. whitters366

    whitters366
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    I concur with Alistair... but it depends how you have your fixed IP addresses allocated..

    Is it by MAC Address, in the router?

    What kind of router is it?

    Please let us know!

    :thumbsup:
     
  6. mark*w

    mark*w
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    Thanks for all the replies (I really appreciate the help)...

    First of all the reason why I'm using a static IP address, is it's the only way I could get my laptop (a Macbook running OS X) to map a shared drive on my Vista desktop (which is where I was my iTunes music library was).

    I'd love to be able to get my Macbook to map to a drive to the desktop, without having to assign a static IP address to it, but never could find a way.

    The router is a Netgear WGR614 v7 and my wireless network card is a Tenda wireless-N USB key.

    Thanks

    Mark
     
  7. mickevh

    mickevh
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