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Started running .... what should I be careful of

jouster

Moderator
For around two years I’ve been pretty fit now.

Although I’ve ridden summer months on the road for around 5 years now, I really ramped things up about 27 months ago adding in weekly

last August I took up the offer of a free month at a HIIT gym and I quite enjoyed it and decided to continue doing it at home in a makeshiftgym in the garage with plenty of TRX, cardio and core work.

so 6 months down the line, I feel probably the fittest I ever have. Without really setting a weight goal, I’ve got down to 10st 12 (started off just over 13st), body fat is around 15% and I’ve even got some abs starting to poke through.

with the recently poor weather, in particular wind, one of my usual weekend rides was a write off so I thought I might go for a relatively
quick and short run.

I live in quite a rural area and I’d walked the same route before, so I set off with no really time in mind.

I should say I’ve never really been a fan of running and that’s probably why I chose riding (I’m not a swimmer either unless it’s mucking about in a pool on holiday) but my thoughts were that a quick run would give a good cardio session in a relatively short time.

So the first run went quite well, covered 5K in 24 mins flat. I felt good and was happy I’d done some exercise that day when I wouldn’t have otherwise ridden

the next morning weather was just as bad and it would be raining that afternoon so again riding was a no no so I decided to nip out for a run again, same route.

It was far windier this time and it felt like I was going backwards a few times, finished the same distance again about a minute slower but again felt good

so now I’m wondering if I should be running a bit more. What would be too much? I’m not fussed about running further as I’m not planning on running a half marathon or anything crazy like that but would running 3,4,5 or more days a week be beneficial or worse for me. Should I be running less than that.?

been told that I could injur myself easily if I’m not careful as myfitness is more cycle based but I’m thinking all of my TRX/floor/core work is on my side for that

I haven’t run today (third day) but that's mainly cos the wind is even worse today but may do so if things calm down tomorrow.

any thoughts from runners or people who cycle and run would really be appreciated as this is all new to me
 

Inked

Distinguished Member
My advice if is don’t worry about the time so much, throw in some longer slower runs, and if you get injured, give yourself time to heal (a mistake that cost me months rather than weeks off running)
 

jouster

Moderator
Thanks. I should say I’m not worried about going faster or further. I never intended to do it in a certain time, it just felt ok at the time.

are you saying I shouldn’talways run it at the speed/time I did?
 

Inked

Distinguished Member
are you saying I shouldn’talways run it at the speed/time I did?
Mix it up, slower 10k, short sprints etc.
I was mainly running 5k due to time constraints (fitting around wife’s work, school run in the morning etc), knowing that I could get it done quickly, but by running pretty much the same set route all the time I ended up chasing faster times.

I still struggle to slow my pace for longer runs, and it’s always nice to see improvement but I now try and do different length runs more regularly and force myself to have “rest runs” at a slow pace.

I’ve also recently started doing a hill run to try and improve my strength and stamina as part of my 5k, so an easy 3km away from my house down hill, a stop at the bottom to let my heart rate lower, and then 2km back up the hill and walk the last 1km home.

I’ve found that having the AirPods and Apple Watch (which I know you also have) makes running far more enjoyable, find music that fits the kind of run you want to do so that it helps with your pace.
 

jouster

Moderator
Yes I’m running with a nicely high beat playlist that means I can almost forget I’m running

still not entirely sure I want to run any frather than I already am, even if is slower. My aim isn’t to improve my time/speed or distance, more to just run as I already am

had no idea it was so specific
 

Inked

Distinguished Member
It doesn’t have to be, you should definitely do whatever works best for you. I find keeping things varied helps me.

Now I just need to start controlling my calorie intake again so that I can get back to 11 stone as I’ve put on half a stone in the last few months and gone back up to 21% body fat :( (not that I’ve ever been as low as you unfortunately)
 

jouster

Moderator
I think I’m truth if I was running with someone I’d run slower as im not sure I can run like I do and talk. That said, no one near me would want to run to so I’m left with solo runs really

I think ill run one day on one day off for now and see how I get on.
 

Inked

Distinguished Member
I think I’m truth if I was running with someone I’d run slower as im not sure I can run like I do and talk. That said, no one near me would want to run to so I’m left with solo runs really

I think ill run one day on one day off for now and see how I get on.
Good plan. I’m the same, I prefer solo running. We have a local park run that starts a 2 minute walk from my house but I’ve never bothered going along. I like to get up, get out and run and get home with only myself to worry about!
 

jouster

Moderator
I’m pretty much the same with running. Hate running slower than I have to/can
 

mr:w

Well-known Member
Sounds like you just need to throw a swim in there once a week and hey presto! sign yourself up for a tri :D

I guess it depends what you want to achieve (kudos for what you've achieved already), but rather than solely looking at how quickly you can run a 5k as a means of measuring fitness, check your HR (if your watch captures that info) and get your zones worked out. You can then see over time you may run a 5k in the same time, but at a lower heart rate. This is a better indicator of fitness. As time progresses, your runs will then get quicker while your heart rate is lower. The hardest thing with heart rate training is sometimes running slower than you'd usually go, but the science works.

Run-wise, if you can squeeze 3 in a week, do 1) a long run at low heart rate, 2) a shorter run but with intervals, and 3) a short tempo run. If you fancy a change, swap intervals for hill repeats occasionally. Always allow 5 mins before to stretch / warm up, and 10 mins after to stretch / cool down.

Get signed up for a 10k in a few months just to give you something to look forward to. I always run alone, but it's good to do something like that just to see what you can do (and put your training to good use ;))

For reference, I run 2-3 times a week, swim and cycle (turbo through winter) at least once a week 'off season'. If I'm training for something in particular I'll train 6 days a week with double sessions (run & swim or bike & swim).
 

clemmeroid

Member
Make sure your running shoes are one size bigger
than your normal shoes, so your feet have room to move during your running
motion, I suffered from shin splints from not initially adhering to this.
Also I belonged to a running club that was well established and our training regime was
Monday hill repeats
Wednesday track, 10 x 400m with a 400m rest in between or 800 400 800 x3 warm down afterwards
recovery runs or a complete rest between days
Race on a week end
There are a lot of run in the park races to test your fitness/improvement
home | parkrun UK
 

jouster

Moderator
Sounds like you just need to throw a swim in there once a week and hey presto! sign yourself up for a tri :D

I guess it depends what you want to achieve (kudos for what you've achieved already), but rather than solely looking at how quickly you can run a 5k as a means of measuring fitness, check your HR (if your watch captures that info) and get your zones worked out. You can then see over time you may run a 5k in the same time, but at a lower heart rate. This is a better indicator of fitness. As time progresses, your runs will then get quicker while your heart rate is lower. The hardest thing with heart rate training is sometimes running slower than you'd usually go, but the science works.

Run-wise, if you can squeeze 3 in a week, do 1) a long run at low heart rate, 2) a shorter run but with intervals, and 3) a short tempo run. If you fancy a change, swap intervals for hill repeats occasionally. Always allow 5 mins before to stretch / warm up, and 10 mins after to stretch / cool down.

Get signed up for a 10k in a few months just to give you something to look forward to. I always run alone, but it's good to do something like that just to see what you can do (and put your training to good use ;))

For reference, I run 2-3 times a week, swim and cycle (turbo through winter) at least once a week 'off season'. If I'm training for something in particular I'll train 6 days a week with double sessions (run & swim or bike & swim).
funnily enough...a friend who has done a couple of Tri's said straight away I just need to up my swim game now....I really don't think that's my thing though as I like to swim but for me swimming is mucking about with mates in the sun...and not much else...

Will certainly take a look at my HR zones....here are the stats captured by my AW4 shown via StravaIMG_8815.jpgIMG_8814.jpg

Whist I can never say never...certaoinly not my intention to do anything competitive so no real training ever going to be needed for something....and the idea of running for an hour makes me not want to run at all....and right now quicker isn't a real need for me......but I will keep an eye on getting the heart rates down for the same run and see how that goes....it's certainly worked well with my riding over the last few years

I should definitely state that I don't want to come across as showing how quick I've run...I just ran it....didn't try to go fast, just ran it where things felt comfortable......I guess someone telling me that cyclists can easily get injured by just running made me think twice.
 

jouster

Moderator
Make sure your running shoes are one size bigger
than your normal shoes, so your feet have room to move during your running
motion, I suffered from shin splints from not initially adhering to this.
Also I belonged to a running club that was well established and our training regime was
Monday hill repeats
Wednesday track, 10 x 400m with a 400m rest in between or 800 400 800 x3 warm down afterwards
recovery runs or a complete rest between days
Race on a week end
There are a lot of run in the park races to test your fitness/improvement
home | parkrun UK
Thanks for the shoe tiup...that is the sort of thing I would never have thought about....again...not sure ill ever want to run with others or in a group as that would probably make me more competitive and right now I prefer riding off-road for that...oh and the idea of a 'race' doesn't interest me at all...but I never thought I'd run a 5K (even looked at the couch to 5k app about a year ago) so who knows

Actually, thinking about it...I did one of those inflatable 5k runs two years back and was woefully awful...so maybe that is something ill give another try in the summer.....maybe
 

KyleS1

Distinguished Member
Can’t say I’ve ever heard or read of running in shoes one size bigger, if anything you want them snug and not slipping around for support.
 

Doghouse Riley

Active Member
Most important is concentration, not on your cadence or whatever, but looking where you are going and being aware of other pdestrians and cyclists if you're running on pavements.
The number of well known athletes who've been injured over the years when "going out for a run," is quite high.

I'm long past running, but did a fair bit in my youth, but I had access to a tartan track, so no chance of injury and it's less hard on the feet. Why not join an athletics club? You're quite welcome just to use it to keep fit.
 

mr:w

Well-known Member
Good shout above about running shoe sizing. Also if you run evenings / nights or anywhere poorly lit, buy a head torch like a Petzl Tikka to avoid running off kerbs, down holes or over anything that'll twist your ankles or knees. Worth getting a couple of good reflective items too - socks, arm band etc.

Having re-read your bit about 'cyclists can easily get injured by just running', not sure I agree but running mid or forefoot will lessen impact on your knees compared to heel strike running, which may be what that person meant. It'll help strengthen calves too, just make sure you stretch well before and after running. Ironically, the injury that stopped me running for 2 months last year was after I'd taken a slam on my bike...... :laugh:

Will certainly take a look at my HR zones....here are the stats captured by my AW4 shown via StravaView attachment 1256529View attachment 1256528

Whist I can never say never...certaoinly not my intention to do anything competitive so no real training ever going to be needed for something....and the idea of running for an hour makes me not want to run at all....and right now quicker isn't a real need for me......but I will keep an eye on getting the heart rates down for the same run and see how that goes....it's certainly worked well with my riding over the last few years
Decent pace :thumbsup:

The hardest thing about getting your heart rate down is to run within a low heart rate zone. Initially it'll feel like you're going way too slow but persevere and over time you'll realise you're running faster for less effort. In terms of looking after yourself, that's safer / easier on you than nearly blowing a gasket when you run, your body recovers quicker, and you're less likely to over-train and injure yourself that way.

Yes they're taken from over a long period of time, but I found these two to compare the difference - hr zone 5 (max effort) in 2013, hr zone 2 (light effort) in 2019 for a slightly increased pace.

 

clemmeroid

Member
Can’t say I’ve ever heard or read of running in shoes one size bigger, if anything you want them snug and not slipping around for support.
One size bigger isn't that much of a problem when you suffer from shin splints I can tell you :)
 
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jouster

Moderator
Third run today and very nice in the last of the days sunshine. Definitely felt slower but turned out to be over a minute (just) faster than my first run for a very slightly further distance.

Still felt comfortable and sprinted the last hundred or so meters like normal.

according to Strava the 5k was 22 minutes and 7 seconds

https://strava.app.link/h3lQu7Mv13
1581527526786.png


are there any specific stretches I should do afterwards? Calf’s feel a little tight but I guess that’s to be expected
 

jouster

Moderator
I’m still doing HIIT and Core sessions as well and planning to get some weekly bike rides in again now the winds have died down.
 

jouster

Moderator
managed to squeeze in a 25-mile MTB ride in between the stormy weather....was good to be back in the saddle after not riding for almost two weeks...planning to run again tomorrow morning in between the rain showers
 

reiteration

Member
I like to do a bit of running (treadmill) after I train my legs, but have only got back into that after using the gyms bikes instead... I just need to build up a steady routine, but it's normally my calves that feel the effect first... but I did a steady 4km on Tuesday night... :)
 

jouster

Moderator
slowed my pace a little for the last two runs....taking things back to a 24ish minute 5K...has brought the heart rate down a bit and legs and calves in particular don't feel quite as tight after the run...so maybe I was going a bit too fast too soon before....either way...three runs a week with a day in between seems doable for me now with a 25-35 mile bike ride over the weekend
 

finbaar

Active Member
Jouster, I would say just continue to enjoy what you are doing. Just listen to your body, in particular your legs. There are many horrible injuries that can crop up. However you seem to have a decent mix of activities to go at so I don't expect you to push through the pain with your running. Someone has already said about the trainers being bigger. Make sure you can fit a thubs width from the end of your toes to the end of the shoe.
 

jouster

Moderator
Jouster, I would say just continue to enjoy what you are doing. Just listen to your body, in particular your legs. There are many horrible injuries that can crop up. However you seem to have a decent mix of activities to go at so I don't expect you to push through the pain with your running. Someone has already said about the trainers being bigger. Make sure you can fit a thubs width from the end of your toes to the end of the shoe.
thanks

Managed 20K (4 runs this week) and it all seems to be fine.

pace seems to be pretty much set between 23 and 25 for the distance

first few runs left calves feeling really tight but after run 5 or 6 that has gone away.

will keep it at 3-4 runs a week with the other stuff and see how I go but good to have this as another option now, especially when I’m short on time. Also when I’m off to Spain in the summer this is something else I’ll be able to do
 

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