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Star Wars trilogy backup onto HTPC?

Discussion in 'Desktop & Laptop Computers Forum' started by Rob.Screene, Apr 18, 2002.

  1. Rob.Screene

    Rob.Screene
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    I want to backup my Star Wars trilogy NTSC laserdiscs onto my HTPC.

    I just bought a midiman coax to optical converter, delivered from millenium music for £40. This should allow my to take my Pioneer 925 laserdisc toslink optical output in to my Audiophile 2496 digital input to record bit-perfect PCM dolby pro-logic.

    I will be using a IDS Falcon to do the video capture.

    I'd appreciate any comments on:
    1. Composite into the Falcon?
    2. S-Video into the falcon (the Pioneer has a reasonable 3-line digital comb filter)?

    3. My HTPC is running WinME, so will the 2GB limit hit me, the laserdiscs are abour 30 minutes a side.

    4. What should I use to capture the video? I was thinking about MJPEG, as I have purchased the Morgan MJPEG codec.

    Was thinking of using avisynth to crop the letterbox image from 4:3 to 2.35:1 (480i60 down around 272i60) when inverse telecine to drop the 59.94 interlased fields per second back down to 23.976fps (272p24)

    Q: What horizontal capture resolution pixel width would you use for NTSC laserdiscs the card seems to do up-to 768(or similar), but that seems overkill for NTSC bandwidth material

    Ideally I'd like the files in DVD compatible MPEG2 format. I was thinking of using TSNmpg(spelling?) which I've played with in the past.

    Is there a way I can compress the audio a bit, with say Dolby Digital AC-3? Without losing the quality?

    I don't currently have a DVD burner, but would buy one if I could get a film onto a DVD in high quality and only several hours work (excluding re-compression).

    Experience and comments appreciated.
    Rob.
     
  2. JohnAd

    JohnAd
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    Rob, use the comb filter on the player rather than on the falcon the player one will be much better.

    I would use soemthing liek VirtualDub for the video capture as you will have plenty of control over the process from in there.

    I would capture at something like 640, that will get all the detail off the disks.

    John
     
  3. Rob.Screene

    Rob.Screene
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    Thanks John.

    There was me thinking you'd just say use the timeshift option in DScaler, it does all you want.

    cheers,
    Rob.
     
  4. nutcase_1uk

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    I thought it was a 4gb file size limit in ME/98/95?
     
  5. buns

    buns
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    i just asked this on avs!!

    How to you get your audio and video tracks synced?

    can you save it into a format where powerdvd will allow you to output as prologic 2?

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  6. JSW

    JSW
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    Rob I just bought a dvd r writer and found out the following:

    on my laptop it took 14 hours to decrpyt (rip) a dvd aaarrrrggghh
    laptop is a p3 1ghz with tosh dvd rom drive.

    next day installed dvd r writer in my main pc AMD Athlon XP1900 with 2 x 40gb hard drives in raid 0

    Then put dvd in writer and pressed decrypt and WOW it ripped it in 12 minutes :eek:
    another 15 minutes spent stripping unwanted soundtracks and subtitles then burned the dvd r mmmmmmmm
     
  7. Splice

    Splice
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    hi, why not download smartripper. (put a search out on yahoo) and you will be able to rip a whole dvd to your hard drive for backup only of course, and it will only take around 20 mins and then you will have a perfect backup including the 5.1 sound, If you have a very large hard disk you could then put a few of your favourite films on to it,and call them from within the file mode of power dvd. i just tried one of my discs and I couldn't see any difference in pq from the original,and the same with the dolby digital 5.1 sound. I am unfortunately unable to store them on my machine as my hard drive is to small. and to full up with home cinema stuff.

    all the best.... Splice;)
     
  8. Rob.Screene

    Rob.Screene
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    Thanks guys. I'm not interested in copying commercial dvd's though.

    John, would you use an intermediate file format?

    I think ideally, I want to recompress to MPEG2 640x480p/24 with MPEG2 audio. Just in case I want to burn the movies onto DVD one day. (I know I'd need to be 702x480p/24 with LPCM or AC-3 to be fully in the NTSC DVD spec, but I'm sure I'm close enough!)

    I was thinking of using VirtualDub and perhaps the opensource BTcapture driver from http://btwincap.sourceforge.net/

    What AVI codec? and what bitrate/quality settings?

    I noticed the Morgan-multimedia MJPEG codec I have has a quality setting up to 100, defaulting to 75.

    Anyone know what quality or video datarate does well for 640x480p/24 star wars laserdiscs!?

    thanks for any advice.
    Rob.
     
  9. JohnAd

    JohnAd
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    Rob

    This site is old but helped me play with some of this stuff

    http://people.freenet.de/codecpage/

    I've used the PIC MJPEG codec on quality of 19 and found it to be pretty good.

    I would capture using VirtualDub with mjpeg compression at high quality and recording the sound too (no compression at whatever the laserdisk outputs) with all the funky interleve options in virtualdub switched on, you should also be able to set this to work around any file size limits.

    Personally I think I would record at 59.94 and then worry about the inverse telecine afterwards.

    Try taking each side of each disk in one go at 720x480 width @ 59.94 Hz.

    and then try and use telecide, or smart deinterlacer (off the top of my head but it's something like that) to convert to a new file at 23.976fps.

    For the audio it's basically stereo so just use MP2 @ 256kbs.

    With all of this you should then be able to create a DVD style MPEG file for burning to a disk with suitable software.

    John
     
  10. Rob.Screene

    Rob.Screene
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    Thanks John. What a great site.

    It looks like your Q15 in PIC is similar to 75 quality in morgan-multimedia's MJPEG codec as the % within the sliders look the same.

    Any reason why you didn't set if higher for the initial capture if re-compressing later?

    It's interesting to note in the format chart that he captured using PIC MJPEG at Q14 768x576i/25 (PAL interlaced material), then used VirtualDub resize to 704x576. Perhaps this horizontal downsampling smooths noise out a bit?

    It looks like I should use the highest bitrate/quality I can at 768x480i/60 while keeping under the recommended 60% cpu limit (on my Celeron 1.1GHz).

    I don't mind doing 1 CAV laserdisc disc side (30mins) at a time, as it's probably a labour or love too. I'm also planning on converting all my Tom&Jerry Fred Quimby boxed set - every decent Tom&Jerry ever!

    thanks,
    Rob.
     
  11. buns

    buns
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    I replied to this earlier but my post seems to have gone!

    I was considering copying laserdisc onto hard drive, but dont know how. Would anyone mind outlining it for me please?

    I appreciate that the vieo is going to be capture separately from the sound. So how do you record the 2 together, correctly timed?

    What would you save it as......or do you record sound and video separately?

    I am aware that power dvd does playback of some variety of hard drive files......can you save the LD copy as this type of file in order that powerdvd may output a pl2 signal?

    How do you deal with the RF input? Do you just capture that signal and then software decode it?

    many thanks!

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  12. Rob.Screene

    Rob.Screene
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    ad,
    By RF, do you mean the raw modulated AC-3 (Dolby Digital) bitstream, output off a few of the later laserdisc players?

    If so, I think you would need an external AC-3 RF demodulator, which I imagine are hard to find these days. I think this would then give you a usual coax S/PDIF AC-3 bitstream.

    My Denon amp has an RF AC-3 input, as it has it's own built-in demodulator for laserdisc AC-3 audio. It also has a digital output, but I really doubt if that gets S/PDIF dolby digital pass-thru out?

    Also, I'm not sure if the Audiophile 2496 can input and record a Dolby Digital bitstream.

    I have the original THX Star Wars laserdiscs, and they don't have Dolby Digital sound, only Pro-Logic. I think only about 3 of my 30 laserdiscs have AC-3 Dolby Digital sound.

    I don't mind explaining this at all, as I'm still trying to get my head around it...

    This is what I was planning in detail (after a bit of research):
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    1) Install a capture driver for my DScaler compatible BTxxx based IDS Falcon video capture card.
    2) Install a MJPEG video compression codec (like an older type of DirectX filter I think) from morgan-multimedia (John mentions a very similar competing on called PIC).
    3) Install VirtualDub.
    4) Install TMPGenc.

    5) Use VirtualDub's File|capture to record the NTSC Laserdisc's S-Video to a 768x480 @59.94 interlaced fields per second (768x480i/59.94 is aparently standard way to refer to this) to an .AVI file via the capture driver. AVI files can be in any compression format for which a codec is installed. In this case I intend to use MJPEG compression at around max quality setting. There will probably be an option/setup screen to configure.

    There will probably also be an audio input option, where I intend to set this to "Audiophile 2496 SPDIF in" to record the raw 44.1KHz 16-bit PCM uncompressed audio.

    I think VirtualDub may interleave these for me into the same .AVI file. Aparently keeping the audio uncompressed and video horizontal resolution low enough so that processor CPU occupancy stays below 60% should mean 0 frames dropped and audio and video don't drift apart and cause lip-sync problems.

    Once I have repeated this for all 4/5 30min sides of the CAV laserdiscs, I will probably end up with around 6-10GB of .AVI files. I think it may stored at around 10Mbit/s video+1.5Mbit/s audio.

    These could stay as they are and just be trimmed and put in some .ASF playlist? This would give minimal video compression artefacts and the audio would be a bit-for-bit copy.

    6) Alternatively, there's an "off-line recompression step". I will try to use TMPEGenc which can read each AVI file and either use the MJPEG codec or apparently an internal MJPEG decompressor to read the AVI files.

    a) TMPGenc can also crop the video, this is useful because of the 480 lines on the 1.33 aspect NTSC Laserdisc, the 2.35:1 film will only use the middle 57%; 272 used lines. The rest are just the letterbox black borders. I should these are either cropped off or ensure they are solid back, so no noise is encoded next.

    b) TMPEGenc can apparently also do inverse telecine 3:2 pulldown. This is because the NTSC disc contans the films 23.976 full frames, but when "telecine recorded", some are mixed and repeated to make it match the speed of the 59.94 half-frames interlaced NTSC tv system.

    Inverse telecine is a way to detect which are the original frames and which are mixed/copies and just pass out the 23.976 full progressive scan frames and is far superior to any de-interlacing which doesn't do this (this is mostly why real-time DScaler and progressive scan playerslook so amazing BTW).

    We get three benefits:
    1) Progressive frames compress better, so they look better or you fit more run-time in a given disk space.
    2) They look better because the don't need de-interlacing, and
    3) We discard the 20% redundant copies of frames just in there for compatibility with an old interlaced tv system.

    So, now we've probably discarded 50% of the data which was just black bars and duplicate information.

    c) TMPEG should be able to resise each frame down to 702x480 or 640x272 if I'm not bothered about DVD player compatibility.

    d) TMPEGenc will encode each of these frames (yes, 23.976 real non-interlaced film frames, per second, as on the film print!) into MPEG2 2-pass variable bit-rate (VBR), just like the hollywood transfers do. I intend to make this MPEG2 format as close to the DVD standards limits for MPEG2 in a DVD. This is in case I want this on removable media someday or it might be needed to make PowerDVD 4.0 think it's a DVD it'd be happy to playback for me without crashing.

    e) I can optionally compress the audio into 2-channel (Dolby PRO-LOGIC) MPEG Layer2 audio apparently. I think 2-channel PCM audio required 1500Kbit/s data rate (like CD), where MPEG2 audio can apparently be up-to 640Kbit/s and often set around 384Kbit/s or lower.

    f) 2-pass VBR allow the compressor to see which bits of the film require the most data and prepare for peaks and troughs of bitrate the film needs. It means the quality is higher within the DVD standard's constraints of a total video+sound of 9.8Mbit/s.

    This is why the results should be better than a real-time MPEG2 compressor. Some people limit this to 8Mbit/s video+384Kbit/s audio when setting-up, but I'm not sure why. I think that would mean a 130min film would require almost a 7GB DVD media. 5.7Mbit/s=34.2MB per min; this would fit 131 mins on the currently avaiable 4.5GB recordable DVD media

    g) The NTSC DVD standard says that there must be a PCM or AC-3 audio bitstream, while the PAL DVD standard says either PCM or MPEG layer2(AC-3 is optional but not part of the minimum requirement for PAL DVD's). However I'm sure most players will work with NTSC and MPEG layer2. I should also convert the 44.1KHz audio to 48KHz to comply with the proper DVD standard, but again, I'd bet most players will be happy with 44.1KHz PCM. I think the Layer2 audio compressor in TMPEGenc may do this for me. I'm not sure what drop in quality that will cause.

    The TMPEGenc had a batch convertor that will do the re-compression overnight. The very best quality settings can apparently take over 10 hour to decode, process and re-compress a film. I'll probably need 7GB captured video + 5GB temporary for splitting/joining and to hold the resulting MPEG2. Oh and I think I may need a multiplexor utilil to get the video and audio files into a .VOB - probably another 5GB = 17GB to do a film.+ 10GB to store the results of the other two in the trilogy = 27GB spare space needed.

    That's the theory. I'll know more about the practicalities if I get time to try is out this weekend.

    Further advice and comment appreciated.
    cheers,
    Rob.
     
  13. buns

    buns
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    wow......its that easy is it!:D

    Thanks for the reply.......i understand about half of it, but im still at learning stages so I will have to keep coming back and re reading! So i shall not comment now since im pretty confident i would be wrong in anything i say!

    I did mean the raw signal.....but silly question since I have a demodulator!

    So what i am picking out is that it is entirely possible to copy a LD onto the hard disc, for want of a better word 'upgrade' the picture and sound to dvd level (does this mean dvd level performance?), then either save to hard drive or external media. The result being that a LD consisting of several sides can be played back with dramatically increased picture quality and a dpl2 sound track?

    The point I suppose I havent really been considering is the cost......what does a dvd writer and blank dvds cost?

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  14. Rob.Screene

    Rob.Screene
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    No, not better quality really.

    Well, not if if you're already viewing your LD's using DScaler and a HTPC (or an expensive hardware de-interlacer).

    DScaler using it's in-built film pulldown detection, whould already be doing the inverse telecine back to 23.976 full progressive scan fps for you.

    It looks even better with the Adaptive or Gradual Dscaler noise filters running. These are from Linday Dubb and are apparently pre-relrease from DScaler 4. Soundwise, taking the uncompressed PCM digital sound straight into an AV amp.

    This makes LD's look amazing already, very close to DVD's even on a 7ft screen. Even NTSC ones (pretty much LD's all are NOT amamorphic 16:9) which only use 272 active picture lines for the letterboxed 2.35:1 film.

    Remember in this case "DVD" is merely a storage format. However, I think the end result should look very much like a normal shop bought "DVD".

    This is the quality level that I want to capture, or as close as I can get.

    This live Dscaler utility will probably compare better than a well compressed MPEG2 VOB capture:
    Advantages of DScaler:
    + NO video compression to effect picture quality
    + NO audio compression to effect sound quality
    + NO serious lip-sync issues possible

    Disadvantages (v.s VOB capture)
    - Pauses during films as CAV side is changed each half hour.
    - Two breaks in film, having to change 1 hour CAV discs over.
    - Laserdisc player analog electronics will deteriorate over time.
    - Laserdisc will be accidentally scrated over time (sorry Star Wars side 2, I didn't mean to drop you!).
    - Laserdisc may rot the metal picture information, ruining the discs after a certain time.
    - NOISE outside picture area can be masked when encoding to VOB.
    - VOB playback requirements are a fraction of the power needed for real-time DScaler with noise filtering.
    - No possibility of using PowerDVD 4 to get cheap Dolby Pro-Logic 2 decoding (where it way with with a home-made VOB file).
    - So, a much more convenient archive and I feel I have excersided my right to backup the Laserdiscs I bought off George onto the convenient medium I would prefer them on!

    I'll get the same benefits on the Tom&Jerry boxed set, which is about 6 discs (6 hours of material) which should compress really well.

    DVD-R/RW writers are about £350 now. This also includes authoring software which may do some of the steps I listed before. I don't know if any of these to inverse telecine to get the 24fps, which as I now know is really important to compressed quality compared to de-interlaced 60fps which wastes so much bitrate because it's encoding duplicated, interpolated information!

    regards,
    Rob.
     
  15. buns

    buns
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    Rob,

    I'm in total agreement with respect to your advantages/disadvantages. Apart from the hassle involved with doing it, this procedure seems all but priceless!

    As a bit of an asside, do capture cards play ball with a composyite input or do you neeed s'vid?

    many thanks

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  16. Rob.Screene

    Rob.Screene
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    The Pinnacle TV Rage I had had one composite, one s-video and a uhf tuner input.

    The IDS Falcon has two composite, one s-video and no tuner.

    Off Laserdisc, the S-Video looks quite a bit cleaner, as John said, the comb filtering in the capture cards isn't great. If you feed S-Video then the comb filtering in the player will have been used instead.

    Regards,
    Rob.
     
  17. buns

    buns
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    The lack of outputs of my ld player necessitates the use of composite!

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  18. Rob.Screene

    Rob.Screene
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    The good news is that Laserdiscs store the video in composite format, so it's nowhere near as bad as using a composite DVD output.

    Rob.
     
  19. Rob.Screene

    Rob.Screene
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    Some success, but it took hours to work this out.

    I installed the IDS Falcon and Video For Windows drivers, then the
    free opensource btwdm driver (because the IDS Falcon drivers only output RGB format, not YUV). In the btWDM installation, I had to select user define and set one S-Video (id1) and one Composite (id0) for the Falcon.

    Set the windows default recording device to Audiophile S/PDIF in.

    VirtualDub, file capture, choose the Windows WDM capture source, then Video, Source to choose the ConnexantBt input and set S-Video input. Calibrated the brightness, contract and saturation using the THX optimode at the end of the Terminator2 laserdisc.

    I downloaded the free HuffYUV lossless compression codec (http://math.berkeley.edu/~benrg/huffyuv.html). Apparently this gives better results than even high quality MJPEG for the capture file. See also http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/H/Huffman_compression.html

    A capture of 720x480 at 29.97fps YUV2 compression with HuffYUV (any of the 3 compression settings) maxed out my Celeron 1.1GHz, running @115fsb=1.265GHz.

    I checked the system, device manager DMA settings for the extra 30GB drive I had installed and found DMA was not checked. I set this and re-booted.

    The above capture was hovering around 90-100% still with loads of dropped frames.

    I replaced the Celeron with an older 1GHz Pentium3. I'd bet there's something like an SSE optimisation in the Huffyuv codec, because using this CPU the CPU utilisation went down to 43-61% during capture - that's full frame 720x480 29.97fps losless with Full 44.1 16-bit audio!

    The resulting bitrate was 8MB/s! Using the VirtualDub Crop options I set the masking with 100 off the top and bottom to only capture the 280 used lines in the 2.35:1 movie. This reduced the bitrate to about 6MB/s, with Huffyuv giving an amazing 3-3.5:1 lossless compression (i.e. no artefacts added which will reduce the later DVD encoding quality.

    So now I've captured Star Wars disc one (sides 1 and 2 because the player automatically turned), one hour, 20GB capture with 51 dropped frames in total (a few of those were between studio logo and at side turn). I think this is pretty much what is referred to as a D1 digital copy.

    I tried compressing this to 6Mbits/s MPEG2 with the Wizard in the TSMPGEnc demo (only CBR allowed), inverse telecine to 24fps, noise filter enabled and it looks very, very good.

    I may also resize the frame to 704 or even 640, as 720 is overkill for NTSC Laserdisc.

    Now I think I need to register TSMPGenc Pro to get full 2-pass VBR compression to get this into a 2GB MPG file, but it looks really promising.

    regards,
    Rob.
     
  20. JohnAd

    JohnAd
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    Rob

    Great work, HuffYUY probably was a good choice as you say no artefacts added at that stage is probably a good thing.

    One thing to keep in mind is that if you want to transfer to DVD-R in the future for playback in a normal DVD player you will want to keep to a recognized MPEG format. I would suggest keeping it as 720x480. I wouldn't bother with the crop but I would (if this is possible) remove any noise in the black bars by masking them to black in some way. I thinks there is a plug-in to do this, if there isn't then let me know and I'll write one.

    This way you will end up with a normal non-anamorphic widescreen DVD. If you start cropping and resizing too much you will introduce multiple scalings which will introduce artefacts.

    Adding true black bars to the top and bottom will add hardly any bits to the MPEG stream over the cropped version and keep all the picture information intact and keep you compatible with the DVD format.

    John

    P.S. I'd love to borrow a copy once you're done ;)
     
  21. Rob.Screene

    Rob.Screene
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    I agree. I want to keep the original scanlines in-place. I only cropped to 280 to save 2MB/sec. I thought a multiple of 8 would be safest.

    In TMPGEnc Pro, I appear to be able to do some final masking of the 3 top black lines and the 4 black left, keeping the image at 720x280 (no resize) within the 720x480.

    704x480 I think is also in the NTSC DVD spec and that may improve the picture by scaing the horizontal down a bit and saving 2% of the resolution to be stored in the final 6000Mbits/sec. Q1: What do you think?

    I also noticed a few combing fields where I did a short encoder test, where TMPGEnc found fields with a little digital noise on them. Perhaps these are around my 51 dropped fields. The nice thing is I appear to be able to override the default whole frames and use adjacent frames.

    Q2: TMPGEnc appears to do a better job than VirtualDub's inverse telecine. Anyone with experience of comparing them? I'll do another short test.
    [Updated: Actually VirtualDub's inverse telecine seems better, but it fails to output properly de-interlaced frames via it's Frameserver. Preview (Slow-mo) in TMPGEnc releals 23.9fps but with combing problems.

    The best solution seems to be Virtual-Dub SaveAVI in with inverse telecine (Full processing mode needs to be set, otherwise it outputs the source 29.9fps, also ensure the Compression... is set to Huffyuv and RGB set to <--YUV to ensure the 24fps remains only YUV and is still huffman compressed), this can then be frameserved to TMPGEnc, then tell TMPGEnc it's using 24fps progressive. This dropped the 29.97fps 1 hour AVI from 20GB down to 15GB, with great inverse telecine and still no lossy compression from the original capture.

    cheers,
    Rob.
     
  22. JohnAd

    JohnAd
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    Rob

    I stand corrected on the 704x480

    http://www.burnworld.com/dvd/primer/PRIMER.HTM

    It is probably worth a test at both resolutions to see if you can see a difference, I'd probably keep it at the 720 if only beacuse all my resolutions will be 1440. I'd be surprised if the picture was noticably different as the detail/entropy of the picture should remain pretty much the same.

    On the other stuff it sounds like you've found a good approach let tmpgenc do the letterboxing.

    John
     
  23. Rob.Screene

    Rob.Screene
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    Hi Buns,
    I've just seen your original question on avs (http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/show...564&highlight=laserdisc+or+resample+and+48KHz). Nobody seems to have addressed what you asked...

    Here's the easiest steps to do the HTPC non-lossy Laserdisc copy:
    1. Set control panel default recording audio to S/PDIF in, if you are using a digital connection from the LD to HTPC soundcard. Also connect the video from the Laserdisc straight into the capture card (not via an amp/switcher) as it improves noise.
    2. Install VFW driver and VirtualDub.
    4. Set your Capture format to 720x480 (for an NTSC disc), YUV mode (NOT RGB it has too much overhead to use IMHO), set Source to S-Video or Composite appropriately.
    3. Find a laserdisc with THXOptimode (like T2 SE) on it to set Capture brightness, contrast, saturation and sharpness settings. Use Preview with Histogram when adjusting th ensure black information doesn't get crushed off the left of the graph and whites off the right. Failing that find really bright and really dark scenes respectively.
    5. Install Huffyuv lossless video codec.
    6. Use VirtualDub capture mode. Set Video Compression... to use huffyuv, (best) and <-- YUV in it's the two settings dropdowns.
    7. Set the multifile option and stripe volume path e.g. to F:\ for your capture disc. You may not have to do this in NTFS discs under Win2000/XP but my HTPC runs WinMe and files>4GB cause capture to stop.
    8. Set capture rate to 29.97 and sound to 44.1KHz 16-bit/stereo. Use the Audio level meter to check the signal is getting through.
    8. Set Capture Stop conditions to stop if dropped frames 6% or more, and if 6MB remains on disc.
    9. Optionally Set Video Cropping (100 top, 100 bottom to leave 280 for a 2.35:1 letterboxed film), remember to enable it. This will make your capture file smaller by not recording the black bars and reduce your CPU% during capture, reducing dropped frames.
    8. Press Play on the laserdisc, Press P to Turn Preview off. Press F6 to start the capture. Watch CPU usage % and Dropped frames count for a few mins to ensure things are running nicely.

    If CPU% is over 80%, you might want to set Video Compression... huffyuv left dropdown to mumble(Fast). This will ease CPU needs but the output file will be temporarily slightly larger.

    This will create a file around 20GB per hour, 29.97fps interlaced, with uncompressed 44.1KHz LPCM audio.

    If it's film material, you want to drop it back to 24fps. At this point I physically move the capture hard disk to my Athlon1900+/WinXP desktop. I only needed the HTPC because of it's high-quality capture video and soundcards.

    9. Open the .AVI fileset in VirtualDub, if you've captured many discs already you may want to File Append to open them too. This might be a bad idea if you are using Win98 or WinMe or FAT32 disk formats because they will make a single, huge .AVI and >4GB (8-16 mins at thi bitrate!) causes problems if not on a WinNT/Win2000/XP NTFS file system formatted disk.
    We are going to copy these into 15-20GB files per hour, so ensure you have enough space free.

    10. Use the edit toolbar to set start and end points and also you can use selection and Delete to remove the side-turn gap. Set Video Framerate to 24 inverse telecine and set full video processing. Ensure Video Compression... is huffyuv (best).

    11. Use the Video Crop settings to mask any junk at the edges of the screen.

    12. If you don't intend to compress the video for DVD use, you may want to enable Virtual Dub's noise filter to clean the video a little for you. I haven't used this because I plan on doing noise reduction when I compress into DVD MPEG2.

    13. Use File Save .AVI to re-process the captured.AVI's into an output .AVI, with progressive 24fps, and pure 44.1KHz audio. This will be about 15GB per hour. It may take an hour or more to re-save. If you have a huge hard disk, you may want to use the job control option to batch these up and run after you've set a few up.

    That's is, losless D1 resolution with uncompressed 44.1KHz audio on you HTPC! Star Wars trilogy = about 90GB!

    For DVD authoring, I have found 44.1-48KHz quality problems and think I have a good solution for this, but I'll test it before writing more.
    cheers,
    Rob.
     
  24. buns

    buns
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    Thakns for tha! So it can be done! I was surprised no one on avs answered!

    This will take some time to digest i think!

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