Split RCA / Phono Input

Witterings

Active Member
I want to split an RCA / Phono input so I can have 2 separate devices (both have 3.5mm jack outputs) running through the same channel.

I was looking at a female 3.5mm jack to RCA like one of these


and then with a headphone splitter on the end of it like this

Amazon product

But there are so many bad reviews on the headphone splitters saying how they drop the volume as well as creating hiss and often that on one of the inputs the signal is so much stronger than the other.

Does anyone know of one of these that works well or have any other suggestions of how I can achieve it without too much loss of quality / volume??
 

BlueWizard

Distinguished Member
Let's get clear on the Inputs and Outputs. You have TWO Output that you want to feed into ONE Input, does that sum it up?

What is the Input and what are the Outputs?


Generally if you try to do that, you are in essence shorting the Outputs together which generally does not work well.

Depending on what the Outputs are, you are going to need some type of mixer to make sure they don't short each other.

Can you be more specific about what you are connecting to what?

Also, how much are you willing to spend to solve this problem?


Here is a very minimum Mixer for a modest amount, that could potentially solve your problem -

Amazon product

4 Stereo Inputs/1 Stereo Output.

The above is likely a Passive Mixer (no power).

In a low cost Active (powered) Mixer, this Amazon version could be considered -

Amazon product

Although it is not a Stereo Mixer. So, you would have to use Channel 1 & 2 for one device, and Channels 3 and 4 for the other. If you can spend more, there are much better more flexible Stereo Mixers to consider, though likely you can find something for under £100.

Though before I committed myself, I would like a few more details.

Steve/bluewizard
 
Last edited:

Witterings

Active Member
Let's get clear on the Inputs and Outputs. You have TWO Output that you want to feed into ONE Input, does that sum it up?

What is the Input and what are the Outputs?


Generally if you try to do that, you are in essence shorting the Outputs together which generally does not work well.

Depending on what the Outputs are, you are going to need some type of mixer to make sure they don't short each other.

Can you be more specific about what you are connecting to what?

Also, how much are you willing to spend to solve this problem?


Here is a very minimum Mixer for a modest amount, that could potentially solve your problem -

Amazon product

4 Stereo Inputs/1 Stereo Output.

Though before I committed myself, I would like a few more details.

Steve/bluewizard



I didn't want to bore people with the detail but I guess it probably is necessary.

The room is joint purpose where I work so have my PC plugged into a reasonable quality amp / speakers and any Outlook reminders etc. "ping" through the stereo. Whilst it's not the main living room HiFi it also partially acts as a music room for later in the evening as it's the only place in the house I can play loud music / watch online music videos on the PC without disturbing anyone.

As a secondary ... I want to plug an Alexa into the same input as on the amp ... the reason for this, I'll use it a lot to diarise work reminders / alarms and if I have to keep switching inputs I'll forget and miss them and would also like to be able to use Alexa through the stereo to play amazon music.

No links came through for the mixer's ... is it possible to PM them to me so I can take a look as a mini mixer may be my best option .... I have a big 10 channel one somewhere from when I was playing in bands / had a 2k pa system but I think that'd be slightly overkill :laugh: :D
 

Mark.Yudkin

Distinguished Member
You need a switch, not a splitter, but of course that allows only one input at a time. A splitter by contrast will allow zero inputs, as it will likely destroy your kit first.

To use two inputs simultaneously you need a line level mixer. These come from professional audio suppliers and support bands, PA applications, and the like. Google stereo line mixer and you'll get some 30 million hits from hundreds of manufacturers, in all sorts of price ranges. If you already have a "big 10 channel one somewhere", that's probably the cheapest solution even if it does seem like overkill.
 

Witterings

Active Member
If you already have a "big 10 channel one somewhere", that's probably the cheapest solution even if it does seem like overkill.

It would work / make sense but space is at a premium and the inputs on it are either 1/4" Jack or XLR mic jacks.

In the short term I've pinched a headphone splitter off another system and am trying that and it seems to be "OK" so I may just get another set of those but if not then I'll do as suggested and look for a line mixer.

Thanks for everyone's help / suggestions
 

BlueWizard

Distinguished Member
....

As a secondary ... I want to plug an Alexa into the same input as on the amp ... the reason for this, I'll use it a lot to diarise work reminders / alarms and if I have to keep switching inputs I'll forget and miss them and would also like to be able to use Alexa through the stereo to play amazon music.

What is the amp that it only has one Stereo Input?

No links came through for the mixer's ... is it possible to PM them to me so I can take a look as a mini mixer may be my best option .... ...

If the Amazon Links aren't showing up, it is probably because you have some form of AD Blocking enabled.

The first link I provided to the passive mixer is to -

Muslady Mini Stereo Audio Mixer with 4-Channel RCA Inputs Separate Volume Controls Full Metal Shell

The second link to an Active Mixer was to -

ammoon Mini Mixer MX400 Ultra-compact Low Noise 4 Channels Line Mono Audio Mixer with Power Adapter

But as suggested if you simply go to Amazon and search "Stereo Line Mixers" you will come up with a long list.

Amazon product

A Passive Mixer has no amplification, but it does provide Resistive isolation between channels. As I mentioned, if you tie two Output together with no isolation you will end up Shorting them together, which is generally not good.

If you don't need both inputs running at the same time, then a simple Line Switch will do.

Amazon product

Amazon product

Even a relatively complex Audio Mixer need not cost al that much -

Amazon product

Even this very basic Active Stereo Mixer has potential -

Amazon product

Steve/Bluewizard
 

BlueWizard

Distinguished Member
Let me see if I can present the Amazon linksVCE Headphone Adapter Jack in a way that will be more helpful -

Muslady Mini Stereo Mixer

Ammoon Mini Mixer MX400

Moukey Compact Studio Mixer

Amazon-UK - Search - Stereo Audio Mixer

Nobsond Little Bear Switch Box

HQ 3-Way Stereo Line Switch Box

Behringer 802 Studio Mixer



The Moukey Mixer uses TSR Stereo 1/4" (6.3mm) Connections, but the can be adapted pretty easily.

VCE Headphone Adapter Jack

This will adapt from 1/4" Stereo to 1/8"/3.5mm Stereo, and then you will need a 3.5mm to RCA Stereo Adapter

Amazon-UK - Search - 3.5mm Stereo to RCA

That should help.

Steve/bluewizard
 

Witterings

Active Member
What is the amp that it only has one Stereo Input?

Thanks you for all of those ... much appreciated and it was adblocker that was stopping the links ... have disabled for this site and they all show now.

The amp's an old ish Yamaha AVR and has got several inputs (although I also split inputs on a Deneon M39 as have Chromecast, Bluetooth receiver and Echo input running through it) but I want 2 things on the same input as I'll forget to switch from one to another and miss diarised reminders for client calls.

I did order a second 3.5mm female to phono and a headphone splitter and that drops the volume (loss of bass is most noticeable) as soon as I plug the 2nd inout in so that hasn't work out.

Seriously tempted with the Moukey you linked to as it's one of the few stereo ones around and quite a few of the passive ones a lot of the reviews say they suffer badly from a drop in volume.

Many thanks for all you help ... is much appreciated!!
 

dogfonos

Well-known Member
As has been said already, by using splitters to sum two or more outputs to feed into one input, you are shorting the source outputs together. And even if this solution appears to work for now, it's not a good idea as it may well be causing damage. How much do you value your sources?
 

Witterings

Active Member
As has been said already, by using splitters to sum two or more outputs to feed into one input, you are shorting the source outputs together. And even if this solution appears to work for now, it's not a good idea as it may well be causing damage. How much do you value your sources?


Really good point and up until this thread I didn't know it'd cause an issue but thank you for mentioning again !!
 

noiseboy72

Distinguished Member
Passive mixers work by using resistors to isolate and sum (add) each source together. You therefore get a loss of 3DB - 6DB depending upon the design of the mixer.

An active mixer makes this gain loss back up again and might have the added advantage of basic equalisation facilities to boot.

This is about the most basic mixer I could find that will make the gain back up, retain everything in stereo and not take up too much real estate on your desk!!


This is a high quality passive mixer. You can easily make the gain back up on the amplifier, as I doubt you will run out of gain before the amp either distorts and is too loud to listen to! Rolls MX42 Mini Stereo 4-Channel Passive Mixer at Gear4music
 

The latest video from AVForums

Paramount + UK launch: Halo, Star Trek and Beavis, and all the latest 4K + Movie/TV News
Subscribe to our YouTube channel

Full fat HDMI teeshirts

Support AVForums with Patreon

Top Bottom