Special built wall for TV placement, and hidden shelfs

Emeraldi

Novice Member
Hello,

I am building a wall for my extension where I intend to hang a TV I will buy later. The idea is to buy a TV of at least 75 "but possibly it can be an 85" TV.

Red rectangle: Desired placement of the TV
Blue rectangles: I want to create two "shelfes" that go about 120mm into the wall and will be hidden later by hung TV. The idea is to have electrical contacts in these shelves, store (hidden) any router / PS5 etc.

I think it will be absolutely best to hang the TV so that the middle of the TV is the middle of the wall, just above the center wooden joist.

My question: Are there wall mounts that I can mount either in "shelf 1" or "shelf 2", which can handle an 85 "TV of about 45kg and which I can adjust sideways so that the TV is decently centered over the middle rule?

I want the TV to be licked against the wall, so I would like to insert the wall bracket into one of these shelves that will be built into the wall (otherwise the wall bracket will build a few cm).

I found the wall bracket below on a lokal store that has a single arm, but spontaneously I think it looks a bit weak (although I should screw it up as a rule). A googling on this wall mount (ISY IWB-6300) shows that it can handle a weight up to 45kg. It also has VESA 400x600 which alot of 85" requires.
wall mount 6300.jpg



Another option would be to have a wall mount with double arms similar to this wall mount below, which also able to carry 45kg. But I see that the part that I mount to the wall is 515mm wide, then the TV will have its center about 260mm to the right / left of my rule.
Wall mounts of this kind, these cant be adjusted sideways (I interpret it as they can only be adjusted in depth (front and back from the wall) and turn / tilt. I may be wrong. It would be really good if I could extend the wall mount 120mm, entire depth of the shelf, and then 260mm the the side.
anderssonwallmount.jpg

It is a load-bearing wall, load of entire roof is on it, and I prefer not to touch existing joist if it can be avoided. The wall will be covered with wood plates (13mm) + plasterbords (13mm) everywhere.

TV-wall.jpg
 

mikej

Well-known Member
I wouldn't want to hide a router and PS5 in a compartment behind a TV - they need to be accessible. Routers can also get warm and the PS5 in particular can get pretty hot and shouldn't be hidden in a cupboard, otherwise it risks overheating as the fan won't cope. I suspect a PS5 fan running at full speed in small wooden compartment would also be pretty noisy, too ! It could potentially make the whole wall rumble with the vibrations if you didn't isolate it properly.

If you want to avoid the use of separate AV/TV units, then you could create a compartment in the wall elsewhere (under the TV ?) that could have vents and/or some kind of door that could be opened during a gaming session to avoid stressing the PS5.

If you want the TV to be flat to the wall, then that would also remove the need for a cantilever bracket. A simple fixed (or tilting) bracket located in the right place is all that you need and if you're building the wall, you could locate horizontal batons specifically in the right place for the bracket to eliminate the need to screw into plasterboard and this will make your installation more secure.

You might also want to think about the mounting height - watching it at a comfortable viewing height should be your main consideration. Ideally, you want your eye level when seated to be between 1/3 and 1/2 way up the screen. I wouldn't want it on the floor, but I think it would need to be lower than 1m to achieve the ideal height for such a large screen.

Lastly - have you thought about sound ? A 75" TV would be a waste without a decent sound system - a soundbar at the very least if you don't want a separate amp and speakers.

Buying the TV and bracket first would be a sensible move IMO, because then you know exactly what you're working with rather than having to second-guess what you might end up with.
 

Williams C Smith

Novice Member
Hello,

I am building a wall for my extension where I intend to hang a TV I will buy later. The idea is to buy a TV of at least 75 "but possibly it can be an 85" TV.

Red rectangle: Desired placement of the TV
Blue rectangles: I want to create two "shelfes" that go about 120mm into the wall and will be hidden later by hung TV. The idea is to have electrical contacts in these shelves, store (hidden) any router / PS5 etc.

I think it will be absolutely best to hang the TV so that the middle of the TV is the middle of the wall, just above the center wooden joist.

My question: Are there wall mounts that I can mount either in "shelf 1" or "shelf 2", which can handle an 85 "TV of about 45kg and which I can adjust sideways so that the TV is decently centered over the middle rule?

I want the TV to be licked against the wall, so I would like to insert the wall bracket into one of these shelves that will be built into the wall (otherwise the wall bracket will build a few cm).

I found the wall bracket below on a lokal store that has a single arm, but spontaneously I think it looks a bit weak (although I should screw it up as a rule). A googling on this wall mount (ISY IWB-6300) shows that it can handle a weight up to 45kg. It also has VESA 400x600 which alot of 85" requires.
View attachment 1711266


Another option would be to have a wall mount with double arms similar to this wall mount below, which also able to carry 45kg. But I see that the part that I mount to the wall is 515mm wide, then the TV will have its center about 260mm to the right / left of my rule.
Wall mounts of this kind, these cant be adjusted sideways (I interpret it as they can only be adjusted in depth (front and back from the wall) and turn / tilt. I may be wrong. It would be really good if I could extend the wall mount 120mm, entire depth of the shelf, and then 260mm the the side.
View attachment 1711268
It is a load-bearing wall, load of entire roof is on it, and I prefer not to touch existing joist if it can be avoided. The wall will be covered with wood plates (13mm) + plasterbords (13mm) everywhere.

View attachment 1711265
You'll want to mount the brackets to the studs. You can do that with a masonry bit, drilling directly through the drywall. If you have a stud finder, you can use that to find the studs in the wall. Then, attach the mount with screws through the bracket and directly into the stud. If the studs are not in the right place, you'll have to install an intermediate piece of wood to cover the hole (check before making the hole, you don't want to put the screws in, then see that the stud isn't there). That said, if you are doing a tiled wall, you won't be able to use a bracket like this, since you'll need to ***** to the wall tile on some kind of angle. There are mounts out there for tiled walls that use very strong adhesives to adhere to the wall, but they are often not adjustable (and they also often don't give you the option to mount the TV on a swivel). This one might work. Best to mount it to the studs, not to the tiles. For a TV, you'll want to look at something that can hold a weight of around 50 pounds (the stud mounted ones will probably be good for that). Hope this helps!
 

Emeraldi

Novice Member
I wouldn't want to hide a router and PS5 in a compartment behind a TV - they need to be accessible. Routers can also get warm and the PS5 in particular can get pretty hot and shouldn't be hidden in a cupboard, otherwise it risks overheating as the fan won't cope. I suspect a PS5 fan running at full speed in small wooden compartment would also be pretty noisy, too ! It could potentially make the whole wall rumble with the vibrations if you didn't isolate it properly.

If you want to avoid the use of separate AV/TV units, then you could create a compartment in the wall elsewhere (under the TV ?) that could have vents and/or some kind of door that could be opened during a gaming session to avoid stressing the PS5.

If you want the TV to be flat to the wall, then that would also remove the need for a cantilever bracket. A simple fixed (or tilting) bracket located in the right place is all that you need and if you're building the wall, you could locate horizontal batons specifically in the right place for the bracket to eliminate the need to screw into plasterboard and this will make your installation more secure.

You might also want to think about the mounting height - watching it at a comfortable viewing height should be your main consideration. Ideally, you want your eye level when seated to be between 1/3 and 1/2 way up the screen. I wouldn't want it on the floor, but I think it would need to be lower than 1m to achieve the ideal height for such a large screen.

Lastly - have you thought about sound ? A 75" TV would be a waste without a decent sound system - a soundbar at the very least if you don't want a separate amp and speakers.

Buying the TV and bracket first would be a sensible move IMO, because then you know exactly what you're working with rather than having to second-guess what you might end up with.
Hi Mikej,

Really good answer. I had not thought about heat build-ups in the devices, which could potentially stress fans etc.

I´ve might tunneled to far in my vision to have a wall with a TV with pure cleaness around it. I had forgotten about the sound as well. Speaking of this, I think a decent soundbar with potentially a subwoofer is an setup I might aim for.

I already have a 40sqm "cinema room with 150" screen and a 7.2 sound system, so the TV solution would shall serve its purpose for relaxed social moments in the living room environment with my family or when we have friends over.

When I have given a little thoughts to your idea I might agree with you that it would be a wise decision to make the "compartment" under the TV instead. Instea of having a compartment with doors, I was wondering if there might be an solution where I could use a frame, with some kind of fabric ( that let air pass, for heat convection ). This could easily be mounted with magnets. In this case I could use my devices with the controlls at the coffee table. And im thinking of installing the the outlets in the roof of the compartment. Electrical and UTP/FTP, where I will also include a hidden 50mm white plumber pipe from the compartments up to the back of the TV. So I could easily have the connections run hidden through the wall up to the TV. (UTP/FTP, power, hdmi etc)

I wonder if there is a showcase for different kind of approaches users have done in the past related to my newly formed idea. It would be really cool if the compartment "door" could blend in to my white walls.
 

Emeraldi

Novice Member
You'll want to mount the brackets to the studs. You can do that with a masonry bit, drilling directly through the drywall. If you have a stud finder, you can use that to find the studs in the wall. Then, attach the mount with screws through the bracket and directly into the stud. If the studs are not in the right place, you'll have to install an intermediate piece of wood to cover the hole (check before making the hole, you don't want to put the screws in, then see that the stud isn't there). That said, if you are doing a tiled wall, you won't be able to use a bracket like this, since you'll need to ***** to the wall tile on some kind of angle. There are mounts out there for tiled walls that use very strong adhesives to adhere to the wall, but they are often not adjustable (and they also often don't give you the option to mount the TV on a swivel). This one might work. Best to mount it to the studs, not to the tiles. For a TV, you'll want to look at something that can hold a weight of around 50 pounds (the stud mounted ones will probably be good for that). Hope this helps!
Is it required to install the wall mount for the TV into wooden studs?
My walls will be, as mentioned, built with 13 mm Oriented strand board (OSB) + 13mm plaster board. Is there a need to try and install additional studs to mach a wall mount that I then buy prior to finish building the wall.

I tried to google for what weight OSB can withstand for a installed wall mount with a heavy TV attached to it, but found various answers in forums. For example, those 85" TVs I´ve looked at is around 45kg (99 pounds).
 

mikej

Well-known Member
Is it required to install the wall mount for the TV into wooden studs?
My walls will be, as mentioned, built with 13 mm Oriented strand board (OSB) + 13mm plaster board. Is there a need to try and install additional studs to mach a wall mount that I then buy prior to finish building the wall.
When mounting something heavy to a wall, it's always preferable to screw into something solid such as wood or brick, but you can mount heavy things on plasterboard if that's not possible - it's just a case of using the correct fixings.

Cantilever brackets in particular put a lot of force on the wall fixings when a large, heavy TV is extended but if you decide not to build a compartment behind the TV (so the TV doesn't need to move) and the TV doesn't need to be angled into the room for viewing, then you would use a fixed or tilting bracket which will be cheaper than a cantilever bracket and more secure.

Whatever bracket you end up using - if you're building the wall, then you have the perfect opportunity to put some studwork (in the form of horizontal batons) in the right place but you would need to buy the bracket (and possibly TV) first in order to work out where this will be.

When you say your walls will be 13mm OSB and 13mm plasterboard, do you mean one on top of the other ? I'm not sure what the building standards are where you live, but inch-thick internal walls would be considered OTT in this country, where plasterboard is normally screwed directly onto the studwork (so no need for the OSB). If your walls really do need 13mm OSB behind the plasterboard for some reason, then this might avoid the need for separate batons where your bracket will be but if not, then a few batons in the right place behind the plasterboard would be a good idea.
 
Last edited:

Emeraldi

Novice Member
When mounting something heavy to a wall, it's always preferable to screw into something solid such as wood or brick, but you can mount heavy things on plasterboard if that's not possible - it's just a case of using the correct fixings.

Cantilever brackets in particular put a lot of force on the wall fixings when a large, heavy TV is extended but if you decide not to build a compartment behind the TV (so the TV doesn't need to move) and the TV doesn't need to be angled into the room for viewing, then you would use a fixed or tilting bracket which will be cheaper than a cantilever bracket and more secure.

Whatever bracket you end up using - if you're building the wall, then you have the perfect opportunity to put some studwork (in the form of horizontal batons) in the right place but you would need to buy the bracket (and possibly TV) first in order to work out where this will be.

When you say your walls will be 13mm OSB and 13mm plasterboard, do you mean one on top of the other ? I'm not sure what the building standards are where you live, but inch-thick internal walls would be considered OTT in this country, where plasterboard is normally screwed directly onto the studwork (so no need for the OSB). If your walls really do need 13mm OSB behind the plasterboard for some reason, then this might avoid the need for separate batons where your bracket will be but if not, then a few batons in the right place behind the plasterboard would be a good idea.
I am living in Sweden and we are building very robust walls were we put a 13mm OSB ontop of the stud, then directly ontop of the OSB another 13 mm palsterboard.
But when I have the possibility to place extra studs for the wall mount I guess I can just do it since it will not cost much.
I am still trying to figure out a good solution in regard to the compartmend and a idea of having a board/"door" attached with magnets over the compartment.
The idea is to have a thin frame, and tighten up some kind of fabric that (textile ?) that will allow air to flow through (for heat convection). I will have white walls and would like the solution to blend in to the environment.
 

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