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Speakers with ATV + monitor

Digsy

Well-known Member
My knowledge on audio electronics is not extensive hence the thread.

All I want is to get speakers (controlled by a remote) to work with my Apple TV.

At the moment I have an Apple TV connected to my LG W2361V monitor (which has no inbuilt speaker) via HDMI for picture. However for audio I have Logitech 2.1 speakers which are pretty rubbish and I have to plug them directly into the monitor's headphone jack to get sound from the two speakers (not the subwoofer, that won't connect). To change the volume, I have to use the buttons on the monitor and this takes a long while, there is no remote for it.

However, I want to purchase better speakers, more specifically I'm looking at the Microlab Solo6c which comes with a remote. How would I get this to work with the Apple TV as the speakers do not have an optical jack as far as I'm aware? Also how would I use a PS3 with the speakers?

3 things to mention:
1) this is a small setup for a university sized accommodation
2) budget is not huge
3) I'm open to any speakers not just the Microlab Solo6c
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
I'd suggest you look at getting an AV receiver as opposed to active speakers. This would allow you to connect your source devices the the AV receiver via HDMI, let it deal with the audio and then connect the AV receiver's HDMI output to your monitor so that the source video can be paassed on through to the monitor. This would also require passive as opposed to active speakers.

As it stands, You'll need to use a DAC to convert the digital audio output of your Apple TV to analogue stereo. The DAC would connect to the Apple TV's optical output and then to the Microlab active speakers via a pair of RCA terminated coax leads. Here's an example of such a DAC:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Neet®-DAC-D...d=1396660512&sr=1-1-catcorr&keywords=neet+DAC

The PS3 is able to outoput stereo analogue audio via the adaptor that came with it or you could utilise an optical switch to share the external DAC's optical input between the PS3 and the Apple TV. Here's an example of an optical switch:

HQ Optical TOSlink 3 Port Switch: Amazon.co.uk: Electronics

Both the Apple TV and the PPS3 would also use their HDMI outputs for video to the monitor, although you may also require an HDMI switch if the monitor onlly has one HDMI input? Here's an example of an HDMI switch:

5 Port HDMI Switch Switcher Splitter 3D 5 in1 1080p 5 HD INPUT 1 OUTPUT for PS3 / Xbox 360 (slim) / Sky HD / Freesat HD / Virgin + / Bluray player / DVD / HD Camcorder / HTPC / Laptop: Amazon.co.uk: Computers & Accessories
 
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Digsy

Well-known Member
I'd suggest you look at getting an AV receiver as opposed to active speakers. This would allow you to connect your source devices the the AV receiver via HDMI, let it deal with the audio and then connect the AV receiver's HDMI output to your monitor so that the source video can be paassed on through to the monitor. This would also require passive as opposed to active speakers.

As it stands, You'll need to use a DAC to convert the digital audio output of your Apple TV to analogue stereo. The DAC would connect to the Apple TV's optical output and then to the Microlab active speakers via a pair of RCA terminated coax leads. Here's an example of such a DAC:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Neet®-DAC-D...d=1396660512&sr=1-1-catcorr&keywords=neet+DAC

The PS3 is able to outoput stereo analogue audio via the adaptor that came with it or you could utilise an optical switch to share the external DAC's optical input between the PS3 and the Apple TV. Here's an example of an optical switch:

HQ Optical TOSlink 3 Port Switch: Amazon.co.uk: Electronics

Both the Apple TV and the PPS3 would also use their HDMI outputs for video to the monitor, although you may also require an HDMI switch if the monitor onlly has one HDMI input? Here's an example of an HDMI switch:

5 Port HDMI Switch Switcher Splitter 3D 5 in1 1080p 5 HD INPUT 1 OUTPUT for PS3 / Xbox 360 (slim) / Sky HD / Freesat HD / Virgin + / Bluray player / DVD / HD Camcorder / HTPC / Laptop: Amazon.co.uk: Computers & Accessories

Thank you for the reply :)

Do you recommend an AV receiver AND a DAC or just an AV receiver?

Could you recommend an AV receiver and passive speakers, nothing too expensive because this is for a small room setup? (Sorry I know nothing about receivers and passive or active speakers)

I need that optical switch but I have the HDMI switch
 

Digsy

Well-known Member
You'd only need an AV receiver. AV receiver include their own inbuilt DACs. You'd also need passive speakers if using an AV receiver.

This is probably the cheapest option worth mentioning and includes the speakers and an active subwoofer:
Yamaha YHT-199 | 5.1 Package System inc Speakers excluding DVD Player | Richer Sounds


You'd also not require an optical or HDMI switch if using the AV receiver.

Thanks, would the receiver come with a remote and that could control the volume from there?

I didn't have a 5.1 speaker system in mind, could I use a set of good bookshelf speakers with the receiver instead?
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
Yes, the AV receiver has a remote that controls its volume as well as many aspects of its functionality.

You simply connect your components to it via HDMI and you then select the source via the remote. The receiver will pass through the associated video while processing and amplifying the audio and outputting it to the speakers attached to it.

You are not compelled to use the supplied speakers and the receiver can be used with any passive speakers as long as the speakers in question have an impedance no lower than 6ohm and no higher than 8ohm. I think it a waste not to use the supplied speakers though seeing as the left and right speaker will be yimbred matched to the centre and the receiver performs at its best while propagating surround sound as opposed to stereo.
 

Digsy

Well-known Member
Yes, the AV receiver has a remote that controls its volume as well as many aspects of its functionality.

You simply connect your components to it via HDMI and you then select the source via the remote. The receiver will pass through the associated video while processing and amplifying the audio and outputting it to the speakers attached to it.

You are not compelled to use the supplied speakers and the receiver can be used with any passive speakers as long as the speakers in question have an impedance no lower than 6ohm and no higher than 8ohm.

Thank you, is this a highly rated receiver for the £100 range?
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
The cheapest AV receiver available is the DEnon AVRX500:
Denon AVRX500 Black | AV Receiver | Richer Sounds


I'd still suggest you go with the Yamaha YHT199 with its included speakers and active sub. I can't see any reason to avoid surround sound or miss the opportunity to have the additional speakers required for it for such a low price? The YHT199 will also facilitate you with auto calibration and room corection, something you'll not get with the Denon AVRX500.
 

Digsy

Well-known Member
The cheapest AV receiver available is the DEnon AVRX500:
Denon AVRX500 Black | AV Receiver | Richer Sounds


I'd still suggest you go with the Yamaha YHT199 with its included speakers and active sub. I can't see any reason to avoid surround sound or miss the opportunity to have the additional speakers required for it for such a low price? The YHT199 will also facilitate you with auto calibration and room corection, something you'll not get with the Denon AVRX500.

There are two reasons why I'm a bit concerned with the supplied speakers:
1) I've read that surround sound in a small room doesn't really work as well
2) I've read that stereo is better than surround, at least for music

I would be using this for gaming, music and watching TV.

Also would this not be the case: if you have "5.1 surround sound headphones" that cost say £100, the cost of individual drivers will be roughly £10< meaning that the quality isn't that great. Whereas if you have a set of stereo headphones for the same price the cost of each driver would be £40ish and thus better quality?

Forgive me if I'm wrong as I don't really know how it works with speakers. When I used to game, this would be the case of headphones and most gamers I knew used to choose stereo headphones such as the AD700 over surround sound headphones such as Sharkoons/Trittons.

How does it work with speakers?
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
It is true to say that a comparably price streo setup will perform better than a muti channel receiver in relation to stereo content, but you will be using a multichannel AV receiver to power the speakers and not an integrated stereo amplifier. Also note that a stereo integrated amplifier will not fascilitate you with the DACs and video switching, the very reasons why an AV receiver was suggested. If you want superior performance in relation to stereo content then you need to go the integrated stereo amplifier route, but you'll lose the internal DACs and video switching associated with an AV receiver. The speakers that come with the YHT199 are small and there's no reason why they cannot be used within a small room. You are free to use other speakers if you so wish, but I feel it a shame not to utilise the receiver to its maximum ability and use it to create a surround sound setup and urilise all of the speaker or use some of the speakers along with alternatives more to your liking.
 

Digsy

Well-known Member
It is true to say that a comparably price streo setup will perform better than a muti channel receiver in relation to stereo content, but you will be using a multichannel AV receiver to power the speakers and not an integrated stereo amplifier. Also note that a stereo integrated amplifier will not fascilitate you with the DACs and video switching, the very reasons why an AV receiver was suggested. If you want superior performance in relation to stereo content then you need to go the integrated stereo amplifier route, but you'll lose the internal DACs and video switching associated with an AV receiver. The speakers that come with the YHT199 are small and there's no reason why they cannot be used within a small room. You are free to use other speakers if you so wish, but I feel it a shame not to utilise the receiver to its maximum ability and use it to create a surround sound setup and urilise all of the speaker or use some of the speakers along with alternatives more to your liking.

Ahhhhh thanks this makes a lot of sense. An AV receiver is definitely what I want, I can't find any reviews for the YHT-199 on Google however.

Also a later date if I wanted to change the speakers could I use 2.0 bookshelf speakers with the receiver?
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
You can use just two passive speakers of your own if you so wish. You can also replace 2 of the supplied speakers with speakers of your own or indeed replace any or all of the speakers including the active subwoofer. Put the receiver in stereo mode and audio only comes out of two of the speakers.

The AV receiver is basically the RXV375, but better value for money given the fact you get the speakers included with the YHT199 bundle. The RXV375 is a well regarded entry level AV receiver.


Although not specifically relating to the YHT199 the following should provide you with some indication of the YHT199's credentials.
Yamaha RX-V375 review from the experts at whathifi.com
 
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