Speakers in relation to Room size

Discussion in 'Home Cinema Speakers' started by Spen, Apr 23, 2007.

  1. Spen

    Spen
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    I'm off to audition a new 2-channel set-up in the next few weeks and I'm in the process of researching a shortlist of speakers to try. I have a slight preference for stand-mounted examples but could be persuaded by floorstanders. Budget for the whole system (Amp, CD, Speakers) is around £1300 so I guess roughly £300-£500 give or take is destined to be spent of the speakers?

    My question is, given the size of the room in which they will be used (approx 6m x 4m or 20' x 13' firing down the length of the room), will the stand-mounted examples (generally speaking) struggle to 'fill' the space?

    All opinions welcome...
     
  2. Caralfa

    Caralfa
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    Don't just listen to speakers in a Dealers Demonstration Room! Always try them out at home in room that you intend to use them or you could make an expensive mistake. If dealer won't let you 'borrow' them even against a deposit, go elsewhere.
     
  3. iainsilvester

    iainsilvester
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    The only difference between larger and smaller speakers is bass extension. A large speaker will not "fill" a room any better than a smaller speaker operating at frequencies within both their ranges. And a typical stand mount will push down to 60Hz comfortably, which is most of the sound track.

    If this sounds strange consider that many high end speakers are 3 way designs (B&W good examples), which effectively breaks down to combined stand mount and bass bin.

    What governs volume is voice coil rating or power handling. Do consider though whether you can live with reduced deep bass. Many folk do.
     
  4. Knyght_byte

    Knyght_byte
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    personally in a room that size i'd go for standmounted, if you find a bit more power in the low end would be useful for some music, consider buying a fast tight sub at a later date....

    depending on your music taste you have a lot of options nowadays in Hifi, dont be afraid of mixing and matching the components either unless you want it to fit aesthetically...

    for £1,300 heres a couple combinations to try and get demos of.....(oh and its worth demoing in the shops room first just to get a rough idea of the systems general sound, then borrow the demo equipment on a deposit and try at home.....if the shop wont do this, even with a full deposit then as said go elsewhere....although being honest for a £1,300 system i wouldnt stress quite so much, if it was £1,300 a component then i'd definitely want a home demo)....

    classical/Metal lover: Arcam amps/CD
    Jazz lover: Arcam amps/CD
    Rock/Metal lover:Roksan Kandy amp/CD
    Techno/Dance lover: Kenwood/JVC/Denon
    R'n'B/Hip-Hop lover: Arcam/Denon

    there are other brand worth considering like NAD and Yamaha, but I havent heard their stereo based equipment properly enough to comment....

    for speakers consider

    classical/metal:Monitor Audio
    Jazz:Monitor Audio, B&W
    Rock/Metal:KEF
    Techno/Dance:Monitor Audio, Wharefedale
    R'n'B/Hip-Hop:Monitor Audio, B&W, Wharfedale

    loads of other speaker makes to consider however that I havnt heard properly again, Quad, Mordaunt Short, Gale etc......

    bear in mind if you want an in-shop demo to give the store a few days notice by phoning up to book the room......whilst most will happily let you demo if you just drop in, if they already have the room booked then obviously they cant and its a little unfair to make them say no this way...

    make sure you take your own music with you, but also ask if they have anything themselves to try out.......heres a tip, even if you are not in to classical music, use some, its the most testing music for a system, if it can at least handle the Handel without cracking up the pressure, then its got good synergy, if you like the family sound of the system with the music you normally listen to as well, then its definitely worth a home demo or even purchase!

    oh, dont be bullied in to buying either, sometimes you'll find you are given a special buy it now and you'll get it cheaper offer etc, dont go for it unless you are sure you like it......if they say they cant be certain they'll give you the same price next time then say 'thats ok, i'm not sure i'll want it next time' and walk out......a good dealer will let you listen to various stuff, not impinge on your thinkings, then when the session is over ask what you thought and what you liked.....if they say would sir like to pay by cheque or credit then walk out, its a good tactic used when selling over the phone (something i'm trained in) but its cheap and tacky in a shop situation...always ignore it....never be afraid to say you'd like to come back again in a few days and listen again, if they are a good dealer they'll be more than happy to do this...

    once you've memorised all this, let it happen on autopilot, make sure when your doing the demo you enjoy yourself! if your not, then its not the right system!

    edit: if you havnt guessed by the way, i love Monitor Audio speakers...lol....they have a fast, tight and lively sound, however some people find them a bit bright....if you prefer your sound mellow then look elsewhere....
     
  5. Spen

    Spen
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    Thanks for the replies. Glad to hear that I'm not wasting my time looking at stand-mounters too. I have Audio-T and Sevenoaks shops close to where I live, so I'll give them a call and see what they can offer.

    Cheers
     
  6. Nobber22

    Nobber22
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    Knyght_byte
    So just how bad is your tinitus after listening to one Dance album???? :eek:
     
  7. Knyght_byte

    Knyght_byte
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    i've always found JVC/Kenwood/Denon gear to be neutral-warm sounding, so paired with MA speakers for punch and snap it works very well for dance music...
     
  8. Nobber22

    Nobber22
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    Really KB? We must have been listening to different Kenwood and Denon stereo amps.....:rolleyes:

    Whatever! :D Spen hasn't told us what he likes to listen to anyway & I suspect after a visit to Sevenoaks, he'll walk out with Arcam/Rotel & MA. :D
     
  9. Spen

    Spen
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    Music-wise I listen to mostly guitar-based stuff... Blur, Teenage Fanclub, Radiohead and the like.

    Sound-wise, I never know how to describe what I like. I suppose I could say that I like a detailed, bright sound with tight bass and clear vocals.

    The reason I posted in the speaker section is because it feels like my budget is indeed pointing to Arcam/Rotel sources but the choice of speakers is much wider.

    Anyone have any opinions on the following speakers (for arguments sake, using Arcam CD73/A70 as the source). Other suggestions welcome.

    MA RS1
    MA GR10
    B&W CM1
    EPOS M5
    EPOS M12.2
    MA RS5
    KEF iQ5
     
  10. JamesWilliams

    JamesWilliams
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    Room size is critical as perfomance will be related to the acousic bass efficiency of the speakers and the cut-off point.

    A speaker can have a high power rating but low acoustic efficiency in the bass - a horn speaker with massive aperture gives the best efficiency.
    Speakers with poorer acoustic coupling will sound better in smaller rooms as they couple to these better. In larger rooms the lack of coupling is more prominent.

    The other important factor I have found is cut-off frequency. The speaker cut-off (-6db) should ideally be somewhat higher than the room fundamental resonance so this resonance is minimised and adds to low end rather than adding boom.

    The shape of the room is also important (square is worst as resonances are all close together).

    In my experience you can always boost bass using amplifier/subwoofers - it is very difficult to reduce it effectively if the speakers are too large/efficient for the room.

    I used to own some acoustic energy evo3 floorstanders that sounded great in a 17' X 20' room but were impossibly boomy in a 18' x 12' room for this reason.

    Rule of thumb - big rooms are better. A flexible system is better (one you can perhaps add a subwoofer to or extend later). Smaller systems (where bass is less efficient often give cleaner/tighter bass). Choose a system just large enough and with enough extension to give cut-off above the room resonance as a guide or use even smaller + subwoofer.
     

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