Question speakers for tv

Discussion in 'Samsung TVs Forum' started by kil2c, Sep 13, 2017.

  1. kil2c

    kil2c
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    i have a ue40h-5500 smart tv 2 years old,getting hard of hearing and wanted to fit wireless speakers but tv does not support multiroom so blue tooth speakers are out .do not want to fit soundbar as wanted speakers to be wall mounted near viewing chair.is there an easy way to fit wi-fi speakers or will i have to fit wired speakers.
     
  2. GadgetObsessed

    GadgetObsessed
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    You could try getting a bluetooth transmitter like this:
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Bluetooth-Transmitter-Receiver-TaoTronics-Wireless-Black/dp/B06WD8Z21S/
    This takes an audio signal from the Tv - either from a headphone socket or an optical output and "broadcasts" that signal via bluetooth.

    You could then use bluetooth headphones or bluetooth speakers with a transmitter like this.

    One key point worth noting is that you may notice a lip synch issue as there will be a delay between the video on the TV and the audio via bluetooth. I also would not recommend having sound coming from the TV and bluetooth speakers at the same time as they definitely wont be in synch and you will get a nasty echo effect.

    I am hard of hearing (I have hearing aids) and have explored a number of options for getting clearer audio when watching TV.

    One of the most helpful things for me has been to get a device that supports Dynamic Range Compression - DRC. One common issue with listening to the TV is that if you turn the TV up enough to hear the quieter dialogue then you get blown away by louder parts of the broadcast. DRC basically reduces the volume difference between the quiet parts and the loud parts of the audio. Generally this seems to raise the volume of the quieter parts of the audio without raising the volume of the louder parts.

    The problem is that to get DRC you will need a device that supports it. Some TVs (but very few) have it built in. I get DRC via having a separate AV receiver and speakers. (BTW it doesnt particularly help to have the speakers closer to the listener.)

    Another point to note concerns multichannel/surround sound vs stereo sound. Most HD broadcasts now have multichannel sound. Now you may not be interested in surround sound in terms of having sound all around you. However, there is a key part of multichannel/surround sound that really helps if you are hard of hearing. With surround sound you typically have 5 speakers - one in each corner of the room and a Centre speaker that sits under the TV. The key point is that the centre speaker carries the dialoge separately from the other speakers. With an AV receiver you can turn the sound for this centre speaker up independently of the others. Also simply having the dialogue coming out of its own speaker seems to generally make it clearer. You dont have to have all of the surround speakers. In our lounge I have only 3 speakers - two corner speakers at the front of the room and a centre speaker under the TV but no speakers in the back corners of the room.

    Personally I have found that the best option overall for best clarity is to use wireless headphones with the TV. The ones that I have are these:
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Sennheiser-Personal-Hearing-Wireless-Headphone-black/dp/B00RGRPPXW
    They are expensive for wireless headphones (I paid about £180 for mine when Sennheiser had a sale) but have a number of features that are ideal if your hearing isnt great:
    (1) They have DRC built in - they call it "Dialogue" enhancement but the effect seems similar to DRC.
    (2) They have a range of of about 8 "Hearing Modes" to select from. These modes correspond to the most common hearing loss patterns. Basically the different modes boost different frequencies to match various hearing losses. The most common hearing loss is to have hearing that deteriorates as the frequency gets higher. This is what I have. For me the 6th or 7th hearing modes work very well.
    (3) These are not bluetooth headphones - they use a different wireless protocol. This means that they dont have the same issue of delay that bluetooth headphones have. However, it does mean that these headphones cannot be used with anything else. Not using bluetooth also means that these headphones have a great range. I can wander around the house and even into the garden without ever losing the signal. (I have used these headphones for listening to the radio as I wander round the house.)
     
  3. kil2c

    kil2c
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    thanks for reply.quite a lot to take in,so will look into this but this seems to solve my problem,also thanks for the info about headphones.very well thought out reply and good of you to go to this ends.thanks again
     
  4. kil2c

    kil2c
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    as i see it if i buy the transmitter and 2 bluetooth speakers and set them up on either side of room this should solve my problem.or go with the headphones for a better solution.any thoughts are welcome.thanks
     

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